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THE 

GOLDEN    BOOK 


OF 


INDIA 


A  GENEALOGICAL  AND  BIOGRAPHICAL  DICTIONARY  OF  THE 
RULING  PRINCES,  CHIEFS,  NOBLES,  AND  OTHER 

PERSONAGES,  TITLED  OR  DECORATED 
OF  THE  INDIAN  EMPIRE 


BY 

SIR   ROPER    LETHBRIDGE,    K.C.I. E. 


MACMILLAN    AND   CO. 

AND   NEW   YORK 

1893 

A II  rights  reserved 


Printed  by  R.  &  R.  CLARK,  Edinburgh 


'By  Special  ^Permission 
DEDICATED 

TO 

HER  MOST  GRACIOUS  MAJESTY 


QUEEN    EMPRESS   OF   INDIA 


INTRODUCTION 


i. — SOURCES  OF  INFORMATION. 

O  official  authority  whatever  attaches  to  this  work,  or  to  any 
statement  in  it.  The  Editor  has  received  the  most  kind  and 
valuable  assistance  from  all  those  Indian  officials  who  have 
charge  of  matters  relating  to  Dignities  and  Titles ;  but  he  is 
alone  responsible  for  the  contents  of  The  Golden  Book  of 
India.  Much  of  the  information  has  been  derived  from  the  Princes,  Noble- 
men, and  Gentlemen  whose  names  are  included  herein.  To  each  one  has 
been  sent,  so  far  as  it  has  been  found  possible,  a  prospectus  of  this  work,  with 
a  request  for  information,  and  with  specimens  of  the  form  in  which  that 
information  is  desired;  and  in  every  case  in  which  that  appeal  has  been 
responded  to,  the  fullest  consideration  has  been  given  to  the  particulars 
submitted  for  insertion.  It  is  hoped  that,  now  the  work  in  its  experimental 
form  is  once  before  the  Indian  public,  all  those  who  are  interested  in  its 
accuracy  will  send  their  suggestions,  whether  for  additions,  or  for  alterations 
or  corrections,  direct  to  the  Editor,  care  of  Messrs.  Macmillan  and  Co., 
29  Bedford  Street,  Covent  Garden,  London,  W.C.  It  will  readily  be  under- 
stood that  in  a  work  of  such  magnitude,  involving  reference  to  some  thousands 
of  persons,  individual  correspondence  must  be  impossible  ;  and  consequently 
the  Editor,  while  assuring  those  who  favour  him  with  their  communications 
that  these  shall  receive  the  most  careful  attention,  hopes  that  he  will  be 
forgiven  if  he  is  unable  to  reply  separately  to  each  one. 

The  task  of  compiling  this  much-needed  work  has  been  of  far  greater 
difficulty  than  was  expected.  Some  of  the  difficulty  has  been  due  to  its 
novelty ;  for  among  those  who  have  sent  information  regarding  themselves 
and  their  families,  there  has  naturally  been  little  uniformity  in  method  or 
scale.  This  difficulty  will,  it  is  anticipated,  soon  disappear.  But  the  chief 
difficulty  has  been  owing  to  the  fact  that  India  stands  alone  among  civilised 
nations  in  possessing  no  special  Department,  College,  or  Chancery,  charged 
with  the  duty — a  very  necessary  duty  from  the  point  of  view  alike  of 


Vlil  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

expediency  and  of  national  dignity — of  recording  and  certifying  national 
honours  and  titles,  of  regulating  their  conferment,  and  of  controlling  their 
devolution  where  hereditary.  The  Foreign  Department  of  the  Government 
of  India,  being  that  Department  which  has  charge  of  the  relations  of  the 
Paramount  Power  with  the  Feudatory  States  and  their  Rulers,  naturally  and 
properly  directs  so  much  of  this  business  of  State  as  cannot  by  any  possibility 
be  shirked.  But  the  question  of  the  very  necessary  establishment  of  a 
Heralds'  College,  or  a  Chancery  of  Dignities,  has  only  once  (in  1877) 
been  seriously  faced — and  then  its  solution  was  postponed. 

The  results  of  this  neglect  are  already  deplorable,  and  must  ere  long 
receive  the  attention  of  the  Government  of  India.  Indian  titles  are  officially 
defined  to  be,  either  by  grant  from  Government,  i.e.  a  new  creation  by  Her 
Imperial  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress  through  her  representative;  or  "by 
descent,  or  by  well-established  usage."  The  Government  alone  can  be  the 
judge  of  the  validity  of  claims,  and  of  their  relative  strength,  in  the  case  of 
titles  acquired  by  "descent"  or  by  "well-established  usage."  And  it  is  clear 
that  this  Royal  Prerogative,  to  be  properly  used,  ought  to  be  exercised  openly 
and  publicly  through  the  medium  of  a  regular  College  or  Chancery.  It  is, 
of  course,  true  that  the  Foreign  Department  possesses  a  mass  of  more  or  less 
confidential  information,  and  thoroughly  efficient  machinery,  for  deciding  all 
questions  of  the  kind,  when  such  questions  are  submitted  to,  or  pressed  upon, 
the  notice  of  Government.  But  when  that  is  not  the  case,  there  seems  to  be 
no  public  authority  or  accessible  record  for  any  of  the  ordinary  Indian  titles, 
or  for  the  genealogy  of  the  families  holding  hereditary  titles.  Much  confusion 
has  already  arisen  from  this,  and  more  is  likely  to  arise.  In  the  Lower 
Provinces  of  Bengal  alone,  there  are  at  this  moment  some  hundreds  of 
families  possessing,  and  not  uncommonly  using,  titles  derived  from  extinct 
dynasties  or  from  common  repute,  yet  not  hitherto  recognised  formally  by 
the  British  Government ;  and  these,  sometimes  justly,  but  more  frequently 
perhaps  unjustly,  are  in  this  way  placed  in  a  false  and  invidious  position. 
The  State  regulation  of  all  these  matters,  in  a  plain  and  straightforward 
manner,  would  undoubtedly  be  hailed  with  pleasure  in  India  by  princes  and 
people  alike. 

In  equal  uncertainty  is  left,  in  many  cases,  the  position  of  the  descend- 
ants of  ancient  Indian  royal  and  noble  families ;  as  also  that  of  the  Nobles 
of  Feudatory  States,  the  subjects  of  ruling  and  mediatised  princes. 

Then,  too,  there  is  endless  confusion  in  the  banners,  badges,  and  devices 
that  are  borne,  either  by  the  custom  of  the  country  or  by  personal  assump- 
tion, by  various  families  and  individuals.  Tod's  learned  work  on  The  Annals 
of  Rdjdsthdn^  taught  us  long  ago  that  badges  and  family  emblems  were  as 

1  Colonel  Tod  says  :  "The  martial  Rajpoots  are  not  strangers  to  armorial  bearings.  .  .  .  The 
great  banner  of  Mewar  exhibits  a  golden  Sun  on  a  crimson  field  ;  those  of  the  chiefs  bear  a 
Dagger.  Amber  displays  \hepanehranga,  or  five-coloured  flag.  The  lion  rampant  on  an  argent 
field  is  extinct  with  the  State  of  Chanderi.  In  Europe  these  customs  were  not  introduced  till 
the  period  of  the  Crusades,  and  were  copied  from  the  Saracens ;  while  the  use  of  them  amongst 


INTRODUCTION  IX 


characteristic  of  Rajput  chivalry  as  of  the  feudalism  of  Europe — appealing  to 
similar  sentiments,  and  similarly  useful  for  historical  and  genealogical  purposes. 
To  this  day  hundreds  of  Chiefs  and  country  gentlemen  in  Rajputana,  in 
Central  India,  in  Kathiawar,  and  in  many  other  parts,  use  their  ancestral 
devices  in  their  seals  or  accompanying  their  signature.  Thus  every  petty 
Thakur  (as  well  as  Chiefs  of  higher  degree),  from  Oudh  in  the  East  to 
the  Western  Sea,  who  can  trace  his  descent  from  the  proud  Chauhan 
clan  of  Rajputs  that  gave  the  last  Hindu  Emperors  to  Delhi  and  Ajmir, 
still  claims  his  ancestral  right  to  the  Chauhan  santak,  or  device  on  seal 
and  for  signature,  called  the  "Chakra"  (see  the  drawing  at  p.  100). 
Figures  of  Hanumdn  (the  Monkey  God),  of  the  Sacred  Peacock,  and  of  the 
Sacred  Garur  or  Eagle,  take  the  place,  in  the  heraldry  of  the  East,  of  the  lions, 
the  leopards,  and  the  fleur-de-lys  of  the  more  elaborate  and  artificial  coat- 
armour  of  the  West.  The  kulcha,  or  "lucky  chapdti"  (biscuit),  with  the 
silver  quatrefoils,  on  the  green  flag  of  the  Nizam,  the  red  oriflamme  of  the 
"  Sun  of  the  Hindus "  (the  Maharana  of  Udaipur),  the  falcon  of  Marwar, 
the  Gangetic  dolphin  of  Darbhanga,  the  white  and  green  stripes  of  the  late 
Sir  Salar  Jang,  and  many  other  hereditary  devices  and  emblems,  have  long 
been  and  still  are  familiar  in  India.  But  there  seems  to  be  no  authority  by 
whom  the  use  of  such  emblems  is  directed  or  controlled ;  nor  has  the 
Government  of  India  ever  had  the  prudence  to  avail  itself  of  the  rich  store 
of  revenue  that  might  easily,  and  indeed  (from  the  historical  and  genealogical 
point  of  view)  usefully,  be  raised  from  the  fees  and  duties  to  be  derived 
from  the  extended  use  of  armorial  bearings.  It  is  hoped  that  the  publication 
of  this  work  may  have  some  influence  in  inducing  the  Government  of  India 
to  establish  that  very  necessary  institution,  a  Heralds'  College  or  Chancery  of 
Dignities,  in  connection  with  its  Political  Department — or,  perhaps  better, 
to  petition  Her  Majesty  to  attach  a  duly-constituted  Indian  Department  to 
the  College  of  Arms  in  London  under  the  Garter  King  of  Arms. 

In  the  existing  circumstances — it  may  be  hoped  only  temporarily  existing 
— described  above,  the  Editor  has  felt  constrained,  very  reluctantly  in  many 
cases,  to  decline  to  insert  the  particulars  of  any  titles  that  have  not  been 
more  or  less  formally  recognised  by  the  Government  of  India,  except  in 
about  half  a  dozen  very  special  cases,  where  there  could  not  by  any  possibility 
be  any  doubt  of  the  authenticity  of  the  claims.  For  instance,  in  the  case  of 
the  Raikat  of  Baikanthpur,  in  the  district  of  Jalpaiguri,  Bengal,  the  title  appears 
to  be  unique  in  India — and  there  can  be  no  doubt  whatever  that  it  has  been 
borne  by  something  like  twenty  generations  of  hereditary  kinsmen  of  the  Rajas 
of  Kuch  Behar ;  some  account  of  this  singularly  interesting  title  has  been 
inserted,  though  there  is  some  reason  to  doubt  whether  it  appears  in  any 

the  Rajpooc  tribes  can  be  traced  to  a  period  anterior  to  the  war  of  Troy.  In  the  Maha- 
bharat,  or  Great  War,  twelve  hundred  years  before  Christ,  we  find  the  hero  Bheesama  exult- 
ing over  his  trophy,  the  banner  of  Arjoona,  its  field  adorned  with  the  figure  of  the  Indian 
Hanumdn.  These  emblems  had  a  religious  reference  amongst  the  Hindus,  and  were  taken 
from  their  mythology,  the  origin  of  all  devices." — Annals  of  Rdjdsthdn,  vol.  i.  pp.  123, 
124.  • 

a  2 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


official  list.    And  so,  too,  with  a  few  well-known  courtesy  titles  (see  §  8  of  this 
Introduction). 

2. — METHOD  OF  ARRANGEMENT. 

After  much  thought  and  deliberation,  it  has  been  determined  that,  at 
least  for  this  first  edition  of  The  Golden  Book — which  in  many  respects  must 
necessarily  have  something  of  the  nature  of  an  experiment — the  Arrangement 
of  the  work  shall  be  simply  alphabetical.  In  future  editions  it  is  possible 
that  the  volume  may  be  divided  into  separate  parts,  distinguishing  between 
Ruling  Princes  on  the  one  hand,  and  Dignitaries  and  Titled  Personages  of 
British  India  on  the  other — or  possibly  distinguishing  between  Territorial 
Titles  and  others.  But  the  difficulties  of  classification  would  be  exceedingly 
great  in  a  large  number  of  cases,  and  any  attempt  in  that  direction  would 
certainly  greatly  delay  the  appearance  of  the  work.  And,  after  all,  even  the 
most  careful  and  accurate  classification  would,  for  practical  purposes,  be  of 
very  little  use  ;  for,  as  the  next  section  of  this  Introduction  will  show,  there 
is  at  present  no  strict  gradation  of  titles — and  of  some  titles  the  relative 
values,  strange  as  this  may  seem,  are  different  in  different  parts  of  India. 

In  India  itself,  the  relative  social  importance  of  the  various  Dignitaries 
included  in  this  work  is  well  known,  and  any  attempt  further  closely  to 
define  precedence  would  be  an  invidious  as  well  as  unnecessary  task. 

For  European  readers  it  may  perhaps  be  sufficient  to  give  very  rough  and 
general  analogies  from  the  European  system.  For  instance,  the  relative  posi- 
tion of  such  potentates  as  the  Nizam  of  the  Deccan  or  the  Maharaja  of 
Mysore  to  the  Indian  Empire  may  not  unfitly  be  compared  with  that  of  the 
King  of  Saxony  to  the  German  Empire.  The  hereditary  Maharajas,  Rajas, 
and  Nawabs  of  British  India  occupy  a  position  very  similar  to  that  of  the 
British  Peerage  at  home ;  while  the  holders  of  the  lower  titles  may  be  com- 
pared with  our  Knights  Bachelors,  and  the  Knights  and  Companions  of  the 
Military  Orders.  Among  the  ruling  chiefs,  their  comparative  position  and 
importance  may  also  be  estimated  by  observing  the  area  and  population  of 
their  respective  States,  as  compared  with  the  smaller  Kingdoms  and  Princi- 
palities of  Central  Europe. 

3. — INDIAN  TITLES  :  GENERAL. 

A  list  of  one  hundred  and  ninety-six  different  titles  known  to  the  Govern- 
ment of  India  has  been  compiled  in  the  Indian  Foreign  Office.  Even  this 
long  list  can  hardly  be  regarded  as  exhaustive,  for  it  does  not  include  many 
dynastic  appellations  which  have  come  to  be  regarded  in  the  light  of  titles, 
such  as  Gaekwdr^  the  dynastic  name  of  the  Maharajas  of  Baroda ;  Sindhia, 
that  of  the  Maharajas  of  Gwalior ;  Holkar^  that  of  the  Maharajas  of  Indore. 
Nor  does  it  include  such  titles  as  that  of  Yuvardj  or  Jubardj  (Youthful  Raja), 
often  applied  (as  lately  in  Manipur)  to  the  heir  to  the  Raj.  And  it  is  of 
course  exclusive  of  the, Military  Orders  of  Knighthood. 


INTRODUCTION 


The  majority  of  these  titles  are  Hindu  (derived  chiefly  from  the  Sanskrit 
language),  or  Muhammadan  (derived  chiefly  from  the  Persian).  The  Bur- 
mese titles,  though  lengthy,  are  few  in  number ;  while  still  fewer  are  Ara- 
kanese  (or  Magh),  Thibetan,  Afghan,  Baluch,  Somali,  etc.  Two  distinguished 
Parsi  families  have  received  the  English  title  of  Baronet ;  wKile  one  Madras 
family,  the  descendants  of  the  old  Nawabs  of  the  Carnatic,  has  the  English 
title  of  "Pjince  of  Arcot,"  called  also  "  Amir-i-Arcot."  The  title  of  Prince 
is  also  often  given  by  courtesy  as  the  English  rendering  of  the  title  of  "  Shah- 
zada,"  conferred  by  Her  Majesty  the  Empress  on  certain  descendants  of  the 
Tippu  dynasty  of  Mysore,  of  the  old  kings  of  Oudh,  and  of  former  Amirs 
of  Afghanistan. 

Some  Indian  titles  are  personal ;  others  have  been  recognised  by  Her 
Majesty  as  hereditary.  It  is  intended  in  this  work  to  distinguish  those  which 
are  hereditary  from  those  which  are  personal. 

In  the  list  of  one  hundred  and  ninety-six  titles  mentioned  above  (which 
is  given  below,  in  section  1 1  of  this  Introduction,  with  a  glossary  of  their 
meanings  where  known),  some  are  specific  titles,  analogous  to  the  English 
"  Duke,"  "  Earl,"  etc.  ;  such  are  Maharaja,  Rdjd,  Nawdb.  Some  are 
descriptive  titles,  somewhat  analogous  to  the  "  Defender  of  the  Faith  "  borne 
by  our  Gracious  Sovereign  ;  such  are  Shams  her  Jang  ("The  Sword  of  War"), 
a  title  borne  by  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Travancore,  and  Path  Jang, 
one  of  the  many  titles  borne  by  His  Highness  the  Nizam  of  the  Deccan. 
Titles  of  the  latter  form  are  generally  confined  to  a  single  personage  or 
dynasty;  but  a  few  are  common  to  more  than  one  State,  as  Lokendra  ("Pro- 
tector of  the  World  "),  borne  by  the  Chiefs  of  Dholpur  and  Dattia. 

4. — INDIAN  TITLES  :  RULING  CHIEFS. 

The  normal  or  typical  title  of  Chiefs  or  Nobles  of  Hindu  descent  is  Rdjd 
(in  the  feminine  Rant),  or  some  of  its  numerous  kindred  forms.  Some  of  the 
latter  are  Rand,  Rao,  Rdwal,  Rdwat,  Rai,  Raikwdr,  Raikbdr,  Raikat.  To 
these  is  added,  to  indicate  excess  of  rank,  the  prefix  Mahd  ("  Great "),  as  in 
Mahdrdjd,  Mahdrdnd,  Mahdrao,  Mahdrdj-Rdnd,  etc.  The  affix  Bahadur 
("Brave,"  "The  Hero")  is  very  commonly  added  (as  an  extra  honorific)  to 
all  Indian  titles,  Muhammadan  as  well  as  Hindu,  and  is  placed  at  the  end  of 
the  name,  much  like  the  English  "  Esquire."  Saheb  is  a  somewhat  similar 
affix,  and  is  very  commonly  used  as  a  courteous  form  of  address ;  when  used 
as  the  supplement  of  a  title  it  indicates  a  rank  somewhat  less  than  Bahadur, 
— thus  Rao  Bahadur  and  Khan  Bahadur  are  titles  usually  of  rather  more  con- 
sideration than  Rao  Saheb  or  Khan  Saheb.  Thdkur  is  also  a  frequently-used 
Hindu  title.  Some  important  feudatory  Chiefs  bear  no  other  title,  but  it 
usually  is  of  less  consideration  than  Rdjd. 

Diwdn  and  Sarddr  are  titles  very  similar  in  character  to  that  of  Thdkur ; 
but  they  are  common  to  Hindus  and  Muhammadans. 

The  normal  or  typical  title  of  a  Chief  or  Noble  of  Muhammadan  descent 


Xli  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

is  Nawdb  (with  Begam  as  its  feminine  form) ;  usually  with  the  honorific  suffix 
of  Bahddur,  and  in  forms  of  courteous  address  with  that  of  Saheb.  The 
title  of  Shdhzdda  ("  King's  Son  ")  is  given  to  some  descendants  of  the  Tippu 
dynasty  of  Mysore,  to  some  descendants  of  former  Amirs  of  Kabul,  and  to 
some  descendants  of  the  old  Kings  of  Oudh.  Other  Muhammadan  titles — 
sometimes  equivalent  in  consideration  to  Nawdb,  but  not  always — are  Wali, 
Sultan,  Amir,  Mir,  Mirza,  Mian,  Khdn  ;  also  Sarddr  and  Diwd%,  which  are 
common  to  Hindus  and  Muhammadans. 

Among  the  Ruling  Chiefs  there  are  some  exceptional  titles,  due  sometimes 
to  differences  of  language,  sometimes  to  other  known  causes,  and  sometimes 
of  unknown  origin.  The  first  and  greatest  of  all  the  Princes  of  the  Empire 
is  always  known  as  the  Nizam  of  the  Deccan — a  relic  of  the  time  when  His 
Highness's  ancestors  were  mediatised  kings  under  the  Emperor  of  Delhi. 
The  title,  though  implying  in  itself  fealty  to  an  Imperial  authority,  is  one  of 
the  highest  dignity,  and  can  hardly  be  translated  by  any  European  title  less 
august  than  "  king " ;  it  is  therefore  a  suitable  title  for  the  first  mediatised 
prince  under  the  Indian  Empire,  charged  with  the  absolute  rule  over  an  area 
more  than  twice  as  large  as  that  of  Bavaria  and  Saxony  combined,  and  a 
population  greater  than  that  of  the  two  kingdoms  named. 

Holkar  and  Sindhia  are  rather  of  the  nature  of  dynastic  names  than  of 
titles  ;  and  the  Gaekwdr  (the  title  of  one  of  the  greatest  of  the  Ruling  Chiefs) 
is  of  a  similar  nature,  having  been  originally  a  caste  name ;  and  all  these 
three  are  relics  of  the  Mahratta  Empire. 

Among  the  exceptional  titles  due  to  difference  of  language  may  be  noticed 
that  of  Jam,  which  is  of  Sindhi  or  Baluch  origin ;  there  are  two  Jams  of 
ruling  rank  in  Kathiawar,  and  one  in  Baluchistan.  The  Ruler  of  Spiti,  an 
outlying  Himalayan  principality  in  the  Punjab,  is  known  as  the  Nono  of 
Spiti — "  Nono  "  being  a  Thibetan  form.  One  of  the  Assamese  Rajas  is  known 
as  "the  Bohmong";  another  simply  as  "  the  Mong  Raja."  Some  of  the  Madras 
Chiefs  have  peculiar  titles  of  local  origin.  Thus,  the  Maharaja  of  Calicut 
bears  the  historic  title  of  "  the  Zamorin  " — probably  a  local  corruption  of  the 
Malayalam  Samundri,  or  "  sea-king."  The  Maharaja  of  Puducotta  is  known 
as  "  the  Tondiman  "  ;  and  some  other  Madras  Rajas  are  called  "  the  Valiya 
Raja."  Nine  Feudatories  (eight  in  the  Bombay  Presidency  and  one  at 
Muscat  in  Arabia)  bear  the  title  of  Sultan.  The  descendants  of  the  ancient 
chiefs  of  Sind  are  called  Mirs ;  the  Chief  of  Afghanistan  is  called  Amir.  The 
Chief  of  Kalat  in  Baluchistan  is  both  a  Mir  and  a  Wali,  and  has  been  created 
(like  the  Amir  of  Afghanistan)  a  Grand  Commander  of  the  Star  of  India. 
In  the  Aden  territory,  which  is  subordinate  to  the  Bombay  Government, 
some  of  the  chiefs  bear  the  title  of  Girad,  which  is  of  Somali  origin ;  others 
are  known  by  the  Arabic  titles  of  Sultan,  Amir,  and  Shaikh.  Some  of  the 
heads  of  Hindu  religious  bodies  are  hereditary  feudal  chiefs ;  and  their  title 
is  Mahant. 

All,  or  most  of  the  titles  mentioned  above,  though  recognised  by  the 
British    Government,    have  come    down    to    us    from   earlier  times.       Her 


INTRODUCTION  xill 


Majesty  has,  in  a  few  very  special  cases,  authorised  a  change  of  title  among 
the  Feudatories ;  as,  for  instance,  when  a  Thdkur  Saheb  has  been  authorised 
to  use  the  higher  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur.  But,  generally  speaking,  when 
it  is  wished  to  confer  honour  on  a  ruling  prince,  it  is  conferred,  not  by  a 
change  in  the  ancient  title  of  chiefship,  but  by  appointment  to  one  or  other 
of  the  classes  of  the  Orders  of  the  Star  of  India  or  the  Indian  Empire — 
by  the  addition  of  descriptive  titles — by  an  increase  in  the  number  of  guns 
authorised  for  the  salute,  such  increase  being  usually  a  personal  one — or  by 
the  conferment  of  Honorary  military  rank  in  the  Imperial  army. 

5. — TITLES  RECOGNISED,  AND  REGULARLY  CONFERRED  BY  HER  MAJESTY 

THROUGH  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  INDIA. 

In  British  India  there  is  now  a  well-established  order  and  gradation 
of  nobility ;  in  which  creations  and  promotions  are  made  by  Her  Gracious 
Majesty's  representative,  the  Viceroy,  just  as  similar  creations  and  pro- 
motions are  made  in  England.  In  the  higher  ranks  of  this  nobility,  an 
additional  step  or  grade  in  each  rank  is  made  by  the  custom,  unknown  as 
yet  in  England,  of  making  the  creation  or  promotion  in  some  cases  personal, 
in  others  hereditary.  But  no  rank  below  that  of  Raja  for  Hindus,  or  Nawab 
for  Muhammadans,  is  now  created  hereditary. 

Rai  (or  Rao  in  Southern  and  Western  India)  for  Hindus,  and  Khan  for 
Muhammadans,  are  the  first  or  least  considerable  titles  conferred  by  the  British 
Government.  These,  with  or  without  the  affix  of  Saheb,  which  adds  to  the 
dignity,  are  very  commonly  ex  offitio  titles,  held  by  the  subordinate  officers  of 
civil  departments.  Next  above  Rai  Saheb,  Rao  Saheb,  or  Khan  Saheb  comes 
the  title  Rai  Bahadur,  Rao  Bahadur,  or  Khan  Bahadur ;  and  this  is  the 
title — though  it  has  sometimes  also  been  made  simply  an  ex  offitio  title — 
which  is  usually  first  conferred  on  Indian  gentlemen  who  have  distinguished 
themselves  by  their  munificence,  by  their  patriotism,  or  in  any  other  way. 
Rai  Bahadur  is  commonly  used  as  the  Hindu  title  in  the  Bengal  Presidency, 
Rao  Bahadur  as  that  in  the  west  and  south  of  India,  and  Khan  Bahadur 
for  Muhammadans  and  Parsis ;  and  this  rank  seems  exactly  analogous  to  that 
of  Knight  Bachelor  in  England. 

Above  this  rank  is  the  title  of  Rdjd  (with  the  feminine  Rani]  for  Hindus, 
Nawab  (with  the  feminine  Begaui)  for  Muhammadans ;  and  this  may  be 
hereditary  or  personal — a  remark  which  applies  to  all  the  higher  ranks. 
Next  higher  is  a  Rdjd  Bahadur,  or  a  Nawab  Bahadur.  Higher  again, 
for  Hindus,  is  the  title  of  Maharaja,  and  above  that  is  Maharaja  Bahadur. 
It  is  one  of  the  many  anomalies  of  the  Indian  system  as  at  present 
existing,  that  there  do  not  seem  to  be  any  Muhammadan  analogies  to  these 
last  two  highest  Hindu  titles,  so  that  a  Nawab  Bahadur  may  be  the  equal 
either  of  a  Rdjd  Bahadur,  or  of  a  Mahdrdjd  Bahadur,  according  to 
circumstance.  These  seem  to  be  very  analogous  to  the  various  steps  in  the 
British  Peerage. 


xiv  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Parsis  share  with  Muhammadans  their  lower  titles.  But  where  they  have 
attained  to  higher  rank  than  Khan  Bahadur,  it  has  been  indicated  by 
appointment  to  one  of  the  Military  Orders,  or  by  the  conferment  of  British 
Knighthood,  or  (in  two  cases)  by  a  British  Baronetcy. 

The  ordinary  sequence  of  rank,  then,  in  the  aristocracy  of  British  India, 
is  indicated  by  the  subjoined  tables  : — 

Hindus.  Muhammadans.      • 

Mahdraja"  Bahadur.  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

Mahdrajl  Nawdb. 

Rdja  Bahddur.  Khan  Bahddur. 

Ra"jl  Kha"n  Saheb. 

Rai  (or  Rao)  Bahddur.  Khdn. 
Rai  (or  Rao)  Saheb. 
Rai  (or  Rao). 

The  eldest  son  of  a  Maharaja  or  Raja  is  called  a  Maharajkumar  (or 
Maharajkunwar),  or  Rajkumar  (or  Rajkunwar),  or  simply  Kumar  (or  Kunwar) ; 
and  these  titles  have  in  some  cases  been  formally  conferred  by  the  Govern- 
ment. Nawdbzdda,  or  Mian,  is  the  title  given  to  the  sons  of  Nawabs. 

Among  the  Barons  of  the  Punjab  there  is  a  remarkable  uniformity  of 
title ;  they  are  nearly  all  styled  Sarddr  or  Sarddr  Bahadur — and  their  sons 
are  often  styled  Mian,  though  this  is  also  an  independent  title,  as  is  Diwdn 
also,  in  the  Punjab.  In  Oudh  and  in  the  Central  Provinces,  on  the  other 
hand,  there  is  the  greatest  diversity  in  the  form  of  the  territorial  titles — 
Thdkur  being  the  commonest  title,  but  Rai  is  also  frequent  (and  of  far 
higher  dignity  than  it  seems  to  bear  in  some  other  Provinces),  and  so  are 
Rdjd,  Diwdn,  and  Rao. 

6. — BURMESE  TITLES. 

The  chiefs  of  the  Shan  and  other  tribes  on  the  frontiers  of  Burma  have 
the  titles  (equivalent  to  Rdjd  or  Thdkur,  or  other  Indian  titles)  either  of 
Sawbwa,  or  Myoza,  or  Ngwegunhmu. 

But  the  regular  Burmese  titles  ordinarily  conferred  by  the  British 
Government  are  these  : — 

(1)  Ahmitdan  gaung  Tazeik-ya  Min  (meaning  "Recipient  of  a  Medal  for 
Good  Service"),  indicated  by  the  letters  A.T.M.  after  the  name — much  as 
the  Companionship  of  the  Bath  in  England  is  indicated  by  the  letters  C.B. 

(2)  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe ya  Min  (meaning  "Recipient  of  the 
Gold  Chain  of  Honour"),  indicated  by  the  letters  K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

(3)  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min  (meaning   "  Recipient  of  the   Silver 
Sword  for  Bravery"),  indicated  by  the  letters  T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

7. — TITLES  AS  REWARDS  FOR  LEARNING. 

It  remains  to  notice  two  Imperial  titles  of  ancient  origin,  as  indicating 
exceptional  distinction  in  learning,  that  were  revived  on  the  auspicious 


INTRODUCTION  xv 


occasion  of  Her  Majesty's  Jubilee.  These  are  Mahdmahopddhydya  for 
Hindus,  and  Shams-ul-Ulama  for  Muhammadans.  It  is  noteworthy,  as 
showing  a  wise  regard  for  that  reverence  which  great  erudition  has  always 
commanded  in  the  East,  that  holders  of  these  titles,  ranking  equally  among 
themselves  according  to  date  of  creation,  take  rank  directly  after  titular 
Rajas  and  Nawabs ;  and  thus  the  dignity  is  rendered  somewhat  analogous  to 
the  high  Dignity  of  a  Privy  Councillor  in  the  United  Kingdom. 


8. — COURTESY  TITLES. 

There  are  many  titles  habitually  used  in  India — and  a  few  have  been 
admitted  into  this  work — that  are  not  substantive  titles  in  the  strictest  sense 
of  the  term,  but  may  best  be  described  as  courtesy  titles.  Of  this  nature  is 
the  title  of  "Prince"  in  most  cases — though  not  in  the  case  of  the  Prince  of 
Arcot,  who  enjoys  a  title  specially  conferred  by  the  Sovereign.  The  title  of 
"  His  Highness,"  conferred  or  recognised  by  the  Queen  Empress,  belongs  as 
of  right  only  to  a  limited  number  of  the  Feudatory  Chiefs,  and  to  a  few  of 
the  Nobles  of  British  India ;  but  it  is  very  generally  conceded,  as  a  matter  of 
courtesy,  to  most  of  the  Feudatory  Chiefs  and  the  greater  Territorial  Nobles. 
The  title  of  "  His  Excellency  "  has  been  specially  granted  to  one  or  two 
Chiefs ;  it  is  also  commonly  used,  as  a  matter  of  courtesy,  in  addressing 
the  responsible  Ministers  of  the  chief  Feudatory  States. 

The  owners  of  some  great  Zaminddris  or  estates,  especially  in  Madras, 
are  sometimes  styled  Raja  in  common  parlance,  even  when  they  have  not 
received  that  title  from  the  Sovereign.  But  there  seems  to  be  no  authority 
for  this ;  nor — so  far  as  is  known  to  the  Editor,  and  with  the  few  exceptions 
above  noted — is  any  name  inserted  in  this  work  as  that  of  a  Raja,  or  as 
holding  a  similar  title,  unless  recognised  by  the  Government  of  India. 

Immemorial  usage  throughout  India  has  conferred  well  -  recognised 
courtesy  titles  on  the  heirs-apparent  of  the  greater  titles ;  and  in  some  cases 
on  the  second,  third,  fourth,  and  younger  sons.  There  is  at  least  one  Raja 
whose  eldest  son  bears  the  courtesy  title  of  Kunwdr,  the  second  son  that  of 
Diwdn,  the  third  that  of  Thdkur,  the  fourth  that  of  Ldl^  and  the  fifth  and 
younger  sons  that  of  Bdbu.  It  may  here  be  noted  that,  in  common  use  in 
Bengal,  the  title  of  Bdbu  has  degenerated — like  the  French  Monsieur  and 
the  English  Esquire — into  a  mere  form  of  address ;  but  it  belongs  of  right 
only  to  a  very  limited  class — and  particularly  to  the  sons,  not  otherwise 
titled,  of  the  greater  titled  personages.  In  Orissa,  Chota  Nagpur,  and 
Central  India,  the  eldest  son  of  a  Raja  or  Thakur  frequently  bears  the  title 
of  Tikait  or  Tikaildo ;  and  sometimes  (but  rarely)  the  second  son  bears  the 
title  of  Pothait  or  Pothaildo,  and  the  third  that  of  Ldl  But  in  most,  prob- 
ably in  all,  cases,  the  younger  sons  are  styled  Bdbu.  In  some  of  the  Orissa 
Tributary  Mahals,  and  in  Manipur  and  in  Hill  Tipperah  and  elsewhere,  the 
heir-apparent  is  styled  Jubardj  or  Yuvardj.  In  some  other  parts  he  is 


xvi  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

called  Diwdn ;  while  in  the  Punjab  the  heir-apparent  of  a  territorial  Sarddr 
is  sometimes  also  called  Sarddr,  but  more  commonly  he  bears  the  title  of 
Mian. 

The  curious  Marumakkatayam  law  of  inheritance  which  prevails  in 
Malabar  and  the  extreme  south  of  India — under  which  the  succession  is  to 
the  offspring  of  the  female  members  of  the  family,  among  whom  the  next 
eldest  to  the  Raja  is  the  heir-apparent — makes  it  very  fitting  that  tte  rank  of 
an  heir-apparent,  in  those  parts  of  India,  should  be  marked  by  special  titles. 
The  heir-apparent  to  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Travancore  is  often  called 
by  Europeans  the  First  Prince  of  Travancore  ;  but  his  proper  courtesy  title  is 
"  the  Elaya  Raja."  The  same  title  is  borne  by  the  heir-apparent  to  His  High- 
ness the  Maharaja  of  Cochin.  The  heir-apparent  to  the  Zamorin  of  Calicut 
bears,  by  courtesy,  the  interesting  title  of  "The  Eralpad."  It  will  be  seen 
that,  under  the  Marumakkatayam  law,  no  son  of  a  Raja  can  ever  be  in  the 
line  of  succession  ;  these  receive  the  courtesy  title  of  Achchhan. 

The  colloquial  use  of  the  dynastic  titles  of  Sindhia  and  Holkar  may  be 
illustrated  by  a  somewhat  similar  Scottish  usage,  by  which  the  actual  Chief  or 
Laird  is  colloquially  known  by  the  name  of  his  estate.  Mr.  Cameron  becomes 
"  Lochiel "  the  moment  he  succeeds  to  the  estate  of  that  name ;  so  one  of 
these  young  Princes  becomes  "  Sindhia "  the  moment  he  succeeds  to  the 
Gwalior  Raj,  and  the  other  becomes  "Holkar"  the  moment  he  succeeds  to 
the  Indore  Raj — the  junior  members  of  these  ruling  Houses  using  the  title 
as  their  family  name. 

9. — ARMORIAL  BEARINGS. 

The  Editor  has  already  pointed  out,  in  an  earlier  section  of  this  Intro- 
duction, the  need  that  exists  for  the  services  of  an  Indian  King  of  Arms  and 
an  Indian  Heralds'  College.  Such  an  institution,  provided  due  regard  were 
paid  to  Indian  sentiments  and  prejudices,  would  be  immensely  popular 
among  the  Chiefs  and  notables  of  India ;  and  a  very  considerable  revenue 
might  yearly  be  raised,  with  the  greatest  goodwill  on  the  part  of  those  who 
would  pay  it,  from  a  moderate  duty,  similar  to  the  one  levied  in  the  United 
Kingdom,  on  the  authorised  use  of  hereditary  cognisances  or  armorial 
bearings.  At  present  an  Indian  noble  is  justly  proud  of  a  cognisance  that 
has  been  honourably  borne  for  centuries  by  his  ancestors,  and  would  prefer 
to  use  it  with  full  legal  authority ;  but  it  is  doubtful  whether  he  can  do  so 
at  all,  except  by  a  most  difficult  and  most  unusual  application  to  the  Earl 
Marshal  of  England  and  the  Garter  King  of  Arms  in  London,  for  an 
authorised  grant.  So,  too,  with  more  modern  adoptions  of  coat-armour; 
these  have  been  authorised  by  the  College  of  Arms  in  London  for  the  two 
Indian  Baronets,  and  perhaps  for  a  few  more — but  as  a  rule  the  modus 
operandi  is  unknown. 

Wherever  the  Editor  has  been  able  to  obtain  a  sketch  of  the  cognisance 
or  device  usually  used  by  .any  Chief — or  that  has  been  emblazoned  on  his 


INTRODUCTION  xvii 


banner,  on  such  public  occasions  as  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi,  on 
the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India — a 
copy  has  been  given  in  this  work  in  the  actual  form  used,  without  regard  to 
the  question  of  its  being  duly  authorised  by  the  College  of  Arms,  or  of  its 
being  in  accordance  with  the  laws  of  European-  heraldry.  It  is  hoped  that 
in  a  future  edition  this  laxity  will  not  be  necessary,  and  that  steps  will  in  the 
meantime  have  been  taken  to  regulate  the  devolution  of  ancient  cognisances, 
and  the  assumption  of  new  ones.  It  is  stated  that  some  of  the  Feudatory 
States  have  placed  coats  of  arms  on  the  postage  stamps  in  use  within  their 
limits ;  and  it  is  quite  clear  that  the  use  of  such  emblems  is  rapidly  becoming 
common. 

In  the  case  of  all  those  Chiefs  whose  banners  were  displayed  at  the 
Imperial  Assemblage  of  ist  January  1877,  *'*•  all  tne  Chiefs  of  highest 
rank — the  emblems  then  used  were  used  "  by  authority " ;  and  copies  of 
some  of  them  have  been  obtained  for  this  work.  The  editor  will  be  glad  to 
be  favoured  with  copies  of  others,  sent  through  Messrs.  Macmillan  and  Co. ; 
and  will  give  his  best  consideration  to  them,  though  he  must  not  be  taken  to 
pledge  himself  to  the  insertion  of  any. 


10. — CEREMONIES  OBSERVED  ON  THE  INSTALLATION  OF  AN  INDIAN  NOBLE. 

The  Warrant  conferring  (or  authorising  the  hereditary  succession  to)  a 
title  is  called  a  sanad — sometimes  spelt  "  sunnud."  It  is  signed,  on  behalf 
of  Her  Majesty  the  Empress,  by  His  Excellency  the  Viceroy ;  and  bears  the 
Official  Seal  of  the  Empire. 

It  is  usual — though  there  appears  to  be  no  invariable  rule — for  the  local 
representative  of  Her  Majesty,  on  the  occasion  of  the  installation  or 
succession  of  a  Chief  or  Noble,  to  present  him  with  a  khilat^  and  receive 
from  him  a  nazar  in  return.  "Khilat"  literally  means  "a  Dress  of 
Honour."  It  usually  consists  of  pieces  of  cloth  not  made  up ;  but  some- 
times it  consists  of  arms,  jewels,  or  other  valuables,  without  any  article  of 
attire,  although  in  most  cases  a  turban  and  shawl  form  part  of  the  gift. 
Indeed,  a  complete  khilat  may  include  arms,  or  a  horse,  or  an  elephant,  or 
all  of  these  together.  The  nazar  (sometimes  spelt  nuzzur)  must  be  of 
corresponding  value  to  the  khilat. 

In  the  case  of  a  Maharaja  Bahadur,  or  other  noble  of  that  rank,  the 
khilat  and  sanad  are  presented,  in  full  Darbdr^  by  the  Governor,  Lieutenant- 
Governor,  or  other  Chief  Civil  Officer  of  the  Province ;  or  if  they  are  unable 
to  be  present,  by  the  Commissioner  of  the  Division  at  the  sudder-station  (or 
capital). 

To  the  Darbar  are  invited  all  the  civil  and  military  officers  available,  also 
all  the  Indian  notables  and  gentry  of  the  neighbourhood. 

The  chair  of  the  Presiding  Officer  is  placed  in  the  middle,  and  that  of 
the  noblefnan  to  be  installed  on  his  right.  The  brother,  son,  and  any  of  the 


xvili  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

relatives  of  the  nobleman  who  may  be  present,  occupy  places,  according  to 
their  station,  in  the  right-hand  line. 

The  chairs  for  all  the  public  functionaries  are  placed,  according  to  their 
rank,  on  the  left  hand  of  the  Presiding  Officer's  chair. 

The  local  notables  and  gentry  occupy  chairs,  also  according  to  their  rank, 
on  the  right  hand  of  the  Presiding  Officer. 

A  company  of  soldiers  is  drawn  up  in  front  of  the  stairs,  as  a^Suard  of 
Honour. 

On  the  arrival  of  the  noble  near  the  stairs,  the  Sarishtadar  or  Munshi  of 
the  Presiding  Officer  leads  him  to  the  audience.  All  functionaries,  out  of 
respect  to  him,  rise  from  their  chairs  on  the  Chiefs  reaching  the  Presiding 
Officer ;  who  then  asks  him  to  take  his  seat.  All  functionaries  and  Darbaris 
must  have  assembled  and  taken  their  seats  before  the  Chiefs  arrival. 

After  a  short  conversation,  the  Presiding  Officer  orders  his  Munshi  to 
take  the  Chief  to  an  adjoining  room,  prepared  previously  for  the  purpose, 
where  he  is  robed  with  the  different  parchas  of  the  khilat  except  the  pearl 
necklace.  After  this,  he  is  again  brought  into  the  Darbar  room,  and  stands 
in  front  of  the  Presiding  Officer.  The  latter,  rising  from  his  seat  with  all 
the  functionaries  present,  then  ties  the  pearl  necklace  round  the  neck  of  the 
Chief. 

The  Presiding  Officer  then  orders  the  Munshi  to  read  out  the  sanad. 
During  the  reading  of  the  sanad  the  Presiding  Officer  and  the  functionaries 
resume  their  seats,  while  the  Chief  and  the  local  notables  and  gentry 
rise. 

The  Chief  presents  the  usual  nazardna  of  gold  mohurs,  and  then  all 
resume  their  seats. 

After  a  short  pause,  the  Presiding  Officer  orders  atr  and  pan  to  be 
brought ;  and  standing  up,  serves  out  the  same,  first  to  the  newly-installed 
Chief,  and  then  to  all  the  Indian  notables  and  gentry  present — the  Munshi 
bringing  up  each  one  in  turn  to  receive  the  atr  and  pan. 

They  all  then  take  their  leave,  and  the  ceremony  is  at  an  end. 

The  ceremony  of  the  Installation  of  a  Raja  Bahadur,  or  titled  personage 
of  lower  rank  than  a  Maharaja  Bahadur,  is  very  similar  to  the  one  described 
above.  But  the  Guard  of  Honour  is  not  so  large,  and  it  is  not  necessary 
that  the  Chief  Civil  Officer  of  the  Province  should  be  present.  Also,  the 
sarpech,  pearl  necklace,  or  whatever  may  compose  the  khilat,  is  handed  by 
the  Commissioner  to  the  Collector  or  Assistant  Collector  of  the  district  in 
which  the  Chiefs  estates  are  situated,  and  he  requests  him  to  invest  the 
Chief  with  it. 

A  ceremonial  similar  to  those  described  above  is  observed  when  a 
Knight  Grand  Commander,  or  a  Knight  Commander,  or  a  Companion  of 
the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  or  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order 
of  the  Indian  Empire,  is  invested  with  the  insignia  of  the  Order  by  the 
representative  of  the  Empress. 


INTRODUCTION 


xix 


ii. — LIST  OF  INDIAN  TITLES,  WITH  A  GLOSSARY  OF  THEIR 
MEANINGS  WHERE  KNOWN. 


TITLES. 


Achchhan 


Ahmudan  gaung  Tazeik-ya  Min  (A.T.M. 

after  name) 
Ahsan  Jang       . 
Ajdhat  Sar  Deshmukh 


Alijdh  (Sindhia)          .  .         . 

Amin-ud-daula"  (Tonk) 

Amir         ...... 

Amir-ud-daula"  Sayyid-ul-Mulk  Mumta*z 

Jang 
Amir-ul-Umara ..... 

Arbdb       

Asaf  Jdh  (Nizdm)       .... 

Azam        ...... 

Azam-ul-Umara  (Baoni) 

Azim-ul-Iktiddr  (Sindhia)    . 

Bahddur  

Bahddur  Desai ..... 
Bahadur  Jang  (Bhartpur)    . 
Bara"r  Bans  (Faridkot) 


Bardr  Bans  Sirmur  (Na"bha) 

Begam  (Bhopdl.     See  Nawdb  Begam) 

Beglar  Begi  (Kaldt)  . 

Bhup  (Kuch  Behar)  . 
Bohmong  (Chief  of  the  Regritsa 

Maghs) 
Brajendra  (Bhartpur) 

Chaube     

Chaudhri  ...... 

Chhatrapati  Mahdraj  (Kolhapur) 


DaVar 
Deshmukh 


MEANING. 

Achchhan  (Malayalam^  a  father,  used 
also  as  a  title  of  respect,  and  in 
Malabar  applied  especially  to  the 
males  of  the  Royal  family  who  have 
no  office  or  official  rank  in  the  State 
(Glos.  of  Indian  Terms). 

Recipient  of  a  medal  for  good  service 
(Burmese). 

Excellent  in  war. 

(Ajdhat,  Persian  Wajdhat\  a  title  of 
honour  to  a  Vicegerent  or  represent- 
ative, as  one  exhibiting  the  presence 
of  a  fully  authorised  deputy  (Mar. 
Diet.) 

Of  exalted  dignity. 

Trustee  of  the  State. 

Prince,  chief. 

A  prince  of  the  State,  distinguished  in 
war. 

Chief  of  the  nobles. 

Lord. 

An  Asaf  (Solomon's  Wazir,  according 
to  the  Muhammadans)  in  dignity. 

Very  great. 

The  greatest  of  the  nobles. 

Most  powerful. 

Brave  ;  a  hero  ;  at  the 'end  of  a  name  a 
title  =  the  English  "Honourable." 

Desdi  (Mar/^Truler  of  a  province. 

Brave  in  war. 

Offspring  of  a  Bardr  (a  Jat  tribe.  The 
Raja"  of  Faridkot  is  head  of  the 
tribe — Griffin). 

Sirmur^  a  crowned  head. 

Lady  ;  queen  ;  title  of  Mughal  ladies. 

Lord  of  lords.  The  Governor  of 
Shiraz  holds  this  title  in  Persia. 

Sovereign,  king. 

(Arakanese)  Head  leader. 

Lord  of  Braj,  an  epithet  of  Krishna. 

A  caste  distinction. 

Head  man  of  a  village  ;   an  honorific 

form  of  address. 
Lord  of  the  umbrella.     A  king  entitled 

to  have  an   umbrella   carried   over 

him  as  a  mark  of  dignity. 
A  just  prince,  a  sovereign. 
An  hereditary  native  officer  under  the 

former  Governments  (Marathi). 


XX 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


TITLES. 

Diler  Jang  (Dholpur) 
Dinkar  Rao       ..... 

Diwdn       ...... 

Diwan  Bahadur          .... 

Farzand-i-Arjumand    Akidat    Paiwand 

Daulat-i-Inglishia  (Ndbha) 
Farzand -  i  -  D ilband    Rashikhul  - 1 ti  - kad 

Daulat-i-Inglishia  (Jind  and  Kapur- 

thala) 
Farzand  -  i  -D  ilpazir-i-Daulat  -  i  - 1  nglishia 

(Rdmpur) 
Farzand  -  i  -  Khds  -  i  -  Daulat-  i  - 1  nglishia 

(Baroda,  Patidla) 
Farzand  -  i  -  Saddat  -  i  -  Nishdn  -  i-Hazrat-i- 

Kaisar-i-Hind  (Faridkot) 

Fath  Jang  (Nizam)    .... 

Fidwi-i-Hazrat-i-Malika-i-Muaz-zama-i- 

Rafi-ud-Darjd-i-Inglista'n  (Sindhia) 

Gambhir  Rao     ..... 
Ghorpade. 

Girad 

Hafiz-ul-Mulk  (Bahawalpur) 

Heladi    Naik    Bahadur    Desai    Nadu- 

gauda. 
Himmat  Bahddur       .... 

Hisdm-us-Saltanat  (Sindhia) 

Hizabr  Jang       ..... 

Ihtisham-ud-daula"  (Jaora)  . 
Ihtisham-ul-Mulk        .... 

Ima"d-ud-daul£  (Baoni) 

Indar  (Kashmir)         .... 

Jai  Deo  (Dholpur)     .... 

Jaldl-ud-daula  (Dujana) 

Jdm  .          .    '      . 

Jamaddr   ...... 

Khan 

Khdn  Bahddur 

Khdn  Saheb. 

Khanzdda  ... 

Kiritapati  (Travancore) 

Kulashekhdra  (Travancore) 

Kumdr  or  Kunwdr      .... 

Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min 

(K.S.M.  after  name) 
Lokendra  (Dholpur,  Dattia) 
Mahant     ...... 

Mahdrdj  Kumdr          .... 

Mahardj  Rdna  (Dholpur,  Jhalawar)      . 
Mahdrajd  ..... 


MEANING. 
Intrepid  in  war. 
Dinkar  (Sanskrit),  Day-maker,  the  sun. 

See  Rao. 

A  minister,  a  chief  officer  of  State. 
See  Diwdn  and  Bahadur. 
Beloved  and  faithful  son  of  the  English 

Government.  p 

Beloved  and  trusty  son  of  the  English 

Government. 

Esteemed  son  of  the  English  Govern- 
ment. 

Favourite  son  of  the  English  Govern- 
ment. 

A  son  emblematical  of  the  good 
auspices  of  Her  Majesty  the  Empress 
of  India. 

Victorious  in  battle. 

A  servant  of  Her  August  Majesty  the 
Queen  of  England,  who  is  exalted 
in  position. 

Sagacious  chief. 

A  Somali  title,  apparently  =  a  chief. 
Guardian,  preserver  of  the  country. 


Brave  champion. 

Sword  of  the  State. 

Lion  of  battle. 

Pomp  of  the  State. 

Pomp  of  the  country. 

Pillar  of  the  State. 

Indra. 

God  of  victory. 

Glory  of  the  State. 

(Sindhi)  Chief. 

Chief  or  leader. 

Lord,    prince,    title   of    Muhammadan 

nobles. 
Brave  lord. 

Son  of  a  Khdn.  Title  of  some  Musal- 
man  chiefs  settled  in  Pandu  Mehvas. 

Possessor  of  a  diadem. 

Head  (Shekhara)  of  the  race  (Kulam). 

Prince,  son  of  a  Rajd. 

Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour 
(Burmese). 

Protector  of  the  world. 

Head  of  a  religious  order. 

Son  of  a  Mah£rajl 

Supreme  Rand  or  king. 

Great  Raj£  or  king. 


INTRODUCTION 


xxi 


TITLES. 

Mahdrdjd  Bahddur. 
Mahdrdjd  Dhirdj  or  Mahdrdj-Adhirdj 
Mahdrdjd-i-Rdjagdn    . 
Mahdrand          .... 
Mahdrdnd  Dhirdj  (Udaipur) 
Mahdrdni  .... 

Mahdrao  .         . 
Mahdrao  Bahddur  (Kota). 
Mahdrao  Rdjd  (Alwar  and  Bundi) 
Mahdrdwal         .... 
Mahdrdwal  Bahddur. 
Mahdrdwat  (Partdbgarh)    . 
Mahendra          .... 
Majid-ud-dauld 
Malanmat  Maddr. 
Maldz-ul-Ulama-ul-Fdzila     . 

Malik 

Mdlwandar  (Ndbha)  . 
Mani  Sultdn  (Travancore)  . 

Mansur-i-Zamdn  (Sindhia,  Patidla) 
Midn 

Mihin  Sarddr  (Baoni) 

Mir 

Mirza 


Mirza  Bahddur. 
Mong  Rdjd 
Muazzaz-ud-dauld 
Mudabbir-ul-Mulk 
Muhtashim-i-Daurdn  (Sindhia) 
Mujdhid-ul-Mulk 
Mukhlis-ud-dauld  (Bahdwalpur) 
Mukhtdr-ul-Mulk  (Sindhia) 
Mulk         .... 

M  umtdz-ud-dauld 
Mumtdz-ul-Mulk 
Mushir-i-Khas   . 
Mushir-ud-dauld 
Mustakil  Jang  (Dujana) 
Mustakim  Jang 
Mutalik     .... 
Muzaffar-ul-Mamdlik  (Nizdm) 
Naik         .... 
Nasrat  Jang  (Bahdwalpur) . 
Nawdb      .... 
Nawdb  Bdbi  (Balasinor)     . 


MEANING. 

Lord  Paramount  king  of  kings. 

King  of  kings. 

Great  Rdnd  or  king. 

Lord  Paramount,  king  of  kings. 

Great  Rdni  or  queen. 

Great  Rao  or  chief. 

Supreme  Rdjd  or  king. 
Great  Rdwal  or  prince. 

Great  Rdwat  or  prince. 
Great  Indra. 
Glorious  in  the  State. 

Asylum  of  the  learned  and  erudite. 

Master,  proprietor. 

Lord  of  wealth. 

The  Sultdn  par  excellence.     Mani — a 

jewel,  a  pearl. 
Victorious  of  the  age. 
Lord,   Master,  title  of  sons,  of  Rdjput 

princes. 

Mihin^  greater,  greatest,  elder-born. 
Chief,  leader. 
A  contraction  of  Amir  Zdda,   "  nobly 

born."     When  affixed  to  a  name,  it 

signifies  "  Prince  "  ;   when  prefixed, 

simply  "  Mr." 

Mong  (Arakanese),  a  leader. 

Honoured  of  the  State. 

Administrator  or  Minister  of  the  country. 

(The  most)  powerful  of  his  age. 

Warrior  (for  the  faith)  of  the  country. 

Devoted  servant  of  the  State. 

Ruler  of  the  country. 

Probably  a  misprint  or  corruption  of 

Malik,  a  king. 
Distinguished  in  the  State. 
Distinguished  in  the  country. 
Privy  counsellor,  choicest  counsellor. 
Counsellor  of  the  State. 
Firm  in  battle. 
Loyal  in  battle. 
Mutlak,  principal,  supreme. 
Victorious  over  kingdoms. 
Nayak,  leader,  chief. 
Victorious  in  battle. 
Vicegerent. 
Bdbi,   door-keeper.      The   founder   of 

the  family  once  held  this  post  in  the 

Mughal  Court,  and  hence  the  title  is 

given  to  his  descendants. 


XXII 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


TITLES. 

Nawdb  Bahddur. 
Nawdb  Begam  (Bhopdl). 
Nizdm-ud-dauld  (Nizdm)     . 
Nizdm-ul-Mulk  (Nizam)      . 
Nono  (Spiti)      . 
Padmandbha  Dasa  (Travancore) 
Pddwi 


Pancha-Hdzdr  Mansabddr  . 
Pant  Pratinidhi 

Pant  Sachiv 
Patang  Rao 
Prince  (Arcot). 
Rafi-ush-Shdn  (Sindhia)      . 

Rai 

Rai  Bahddur. 

Rai  Rdydn  (Banswara) 

Rai  Sdheb. 

Rais-ud-dauld  (Dholpur) 

Raj  Rdjendra  (Jaipur) 

Raj  Rajeshwar  (Holkar),  etc. 

Raj  Saheb 

Rdjd          .... 

Rdjd  Bahddur. 

Rdjd  Dhirdj 

Rdjd-i-Rdjagdn  . 

Rajeshwar. 

Rand 


Rani 

Rao 

Rao  Bahddur. 
Rao  Saheb. 
Rashid-ul-Mulk  (Baoni)      . 

Rawal 

Rdwat 

Rukn-ud-dauld  (Bahdwalpur) 
Rustam-i-Daurdn  (Nizam)  . 

Rustam  Jang     .          .          . 
Saheb-i-Jdh  (Baoni)    . 

Saif-ud-dauld 

Sar  Desdi 

Sdrdmad  -  i  -  Rdjahd  -  i  -  Bundelkhand 

(Orchha) 
Sdrdmad  -  i  -  Rajahd  -  i  -  Hindustan 

(Jaipur) 
Sarddr       ...... 

Sarddr  Bahddur. 


MEANING. 


Regulator  of  the  State. 
Administrator  of  the  country. 
(Tibetan)  Young  nobleman. 
Servant  of  Vishnu  (the  lotus-navelled). 
Or  Pdri)i)  clan  title  borne  after  their 

names    by   certain    Merlvas    Chiefs 

(Bombay  Gazetteer}. 
Noble  holding  a  mansab   or  military 

rank  of  5000  horse. 
Pratinidhi)  a  vicegerent ;  title  borne  by 

a  distinguished  Maratha  family. 
SachiV)  Minister,  counsellor. 
From  Patang)  the  sun,  and  Rao^  prince. 

Of  exalted  dignity. 

(Prakrit  Rai  =  Raja")  Prince,  chief. 

Rai  of  Rais,  prince  of  princes. 

Ruler  of  the  State. 

Lord  of  kings,  king  of  kings. 

Rajeshivar,  king  of  kings. 

Raj  =  Raja". 

King,  prince. 

Paramount  Raja",  king  of  kings. 
Raja"  of  Raja's. 

From  Rajan  (  =  Rajd)  +  Ka  (expressing 

diminutiveness). 
Title   of  a    prince  or  Rajd,  especially 

among  Rajputs. 
Queen,  princess. 
King,  prince,  chief. 


Director  of  the  country. 
Prince,  chief. 

Do. 

Pillar  of  the  State. 
The   Rustam    (the  most   renowned   of 

Persian  heroes)  of  his  time. 
A  Rustam  in  battle. 
Possessed  of  dignity. 
Sword  of  the  State. 
Chief  Desdi  or  ruler  of  a  province. 
Head  of  the  Rdjds  of  Bundelkhand. 

Head  of  the  Rdjds  of  Hindustan. 
Chief  officer  of  rank. 


INTRODUCTION 


xxin 


TITLES. 

Saulat  Jang  (Tonk)    . 
Sawdi 


Sawdi  Bahddur  (Kutch). 

Sawdi  Rao. 

Send  Khas  Khel  (Gaekwdr) 

Send  Pati 

Shdhzdda 

Shaikh 

Shaikh-ul-Mushaikh   .... 
Shamsher  Bahddur  (Baroda) 
Shamsher  Jang  (Travancore) 
Shams-ud-dauld          .... 
Shiromani  (Bikanir)  . 
Shrimdn       Maha      Naik      Nadgauda 

Nagnuriebirada  Himori. 
Shujd-at  Jang    .          . 
Sipahddr-ul-Mulk  (Dholpur) 
Sipar-i-Saltanat  (Kashmir)  . 
Srindth  (Sindhia)        .... 

Sultdn 

Thdkur 

Thdkur  Rdwat. 

Thdkur  Saheb. 

Thdkur  Send  Rai. 

Thdkurdni          ..... 

Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min  (T.D.M. 

after  name) 
Umdat-ul-Mulk  . 

Umdat-ul-Umara  (Sindhia) 
Vanji  (Travancore)     .... 
Vishwdsrao        . 

Wachandth 

Wdld  Shikoh  (Sindhia) 

Wali  (Kaldt) 

Walvi 


Wasava    . 
Wazir-ud-dauld . 
Wazir-ul-Mulk  (Tonk) 
Zamorin    . 


MEANING. 
Fury  of  war. 
Literally,  having  the  excess  of  a  fourth  ; 

i.e.  better  than  others  by  25  per  cent. 

A  Hindu  title. 


Chief  of  the  army,  commander  of  the 

army  of  the  State. 
Army- Chief,  General. 
Prince-Royal,  prince. 
Chief. 

Doctor  of  doctors  (of  law). 
A  mighty  man  of  the  sword. 
The  sword  of  war. 
The  sun  of  the  State. 
The  gem,  the  best  (of). 


Brave  in  war. 

Commander  of  the  army  of  the  country. 

Shield  of  the  Empire. 

Lord  of  Fortune. 

Prince,  ruler. 

Chief,  feudal  noble. 


Female  Thdkur. 

Recipient    of    the    Silver    Sword    for 

Bravery  (Burmese). 
Chosen  of  the  State. 
Chosen  from  among  the  nobles. 
Dynastic  name. 

From  Vishvuds,  trust,  and  Rao,  prince. 
Vachan-ndth,  Lord  of  Speech. 
Of  high  dignity. 
Prince,  governor. 
Or  Valvi.     Clan  title  borne  after  their 

names    by    certain    Mehvas    Chiefs 

(Bombay  Gazetteer], 
Or  Vasava        Do. 
Minister  of  the  State. 

Do. 
Vernacular  modification  of  Samundri, 

the  sea  king  (Malayalam). 


NOTICE 

THIS  Edition  of  The  Golden  Book  of  India  is  up  to  date.  It  con- 
tains the  Honours  conferred  in  January  1893  —  including  fifty -four 
new  Titles,  and  nine  appointments  to,  or  promotions  in,  the  Orders  of 
the  Star  of  India  and  the  Indian  Empire,  gazetted  in  Calcutta  on  2nd 
January  1893. 

Communications    relating   to   the    Second    Edition    should  be  ad- 
dressed to 

SIR  ROPER  LETHBRIDGE,  K.C.I. E., 
c/o  Messrs.  MACMILLAN  &  Co., 
29  BEDFORD  STREET, 

COVENT  GARDEN, 

LONDON,  W.C. 

January  3U/,  1893. 


ABAJI  BALWANT  BHISB,  Rao  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  arid  was  conferred  on  nth  September  1884. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

ABBAS  ALI  walad  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     The  Mir  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 

ABBAS  KHAN,  MIRZA,  C.I.E. 

The  Mirza  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire,  ist  January  1882. 
Residence. — 

ABDUL  ALI,  Khan  Bahddur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  was  born  in  1863,  and  is  a  descendant  of  the  old 
Nawabs  of  the  Carnatic,  being  the  son  of  Muazzaz-ud-daula,  and  grandson 
of  His  late  Highness  Azim  Jah,  first  titular  Prince  of  Arcot.  He  was  granted 
the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  in  1876. 

Residence. — M  adras. 

ABDUL  ALI,  MIR,  Khan  Bahddur,  and  Sarddr. 

The  titles  are  personal,  and  were  conferred,  the  first  on  22nd  January 
1873,  and  the  second  on  3ist  May  1891. 
Residence. — B  ombay. 

ABDUL  FATEH,  MAULAVI,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1887. 
Residence. — Na"sik,  Bombay. 

ABDUL  FIROZ  KHAN  (of  Sdvanur),  Nawdb. 

The  Nawab  is  the  uncle  of  the  ruling  Nawab  of  Savanur  in  the  Dharwar 
district. 

Residence. — -Dharwar,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ABDUL  PIROZ  KHAN,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  tne 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Bhusdwal,  Bombay. 

ABDUL  GHANI,  KHWAJA  SIR,  K.C.S.I.,  Nawdb  (of  Dacca}. 

Born  about  the  year  1813.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred 
on  ist  January  1877.  The  Nawab,  who  is  famous  throughout  Bengal  for 
his  great  wealth,  liberality,  and  public  spirit,  is  descended  from  the  Bonda 
family,  of  Kashmiri  origin.  The  Maulavi  Abdullah,  who  was  the  son  of 
the  Maulavi  Abdul  Kadir,  and  was  born  in  Kashmir,  came  to  Bengal  in  the 
reign  of  the  Emperor  Mahmud  Shah,  and  established  himself  in  Sylhet. 
His  grandson  was  the  Khwaja  Alimullah,  who  was  the  father  of  the  subject 
of  this  notice.  The  Nawab  Abdul  Ghani  first  distinguished  himself  for  his 
loyalty  during  the  Mutinies  of  1857,  assisting  the  Government  with  infor- 
mation, advice,  and  funds.  Placed  his  steamer,  The  Star  of  Dacca,  at  the 
disposal  of  Government  during  the  famine  of  1874,  and  after  the  cyclone  of 
October  1876,  for  relief  work.  Has  contributed  largely  to  works  of  public 
utility,  and  on  all  occasions  of  distress.  He  has  been  a  great  benefactor  to 
the  city  of  Dacca,  where  he  has  supplied  many  public  buildings,  and  main- 
tains a  Free  School,  a  Madrasa  for  Muhammadan  students,  an  almshouse, 
etc.  He  was  created  C.S.I.  in  1871  ;  Nawab  (personal)  in  1875  ;  hereditary 
Nawab  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty 
as  Empress,  ist  January  1877;  K. C.S.I.,  1886.  His  son  is  the  Hon. 
Nawab  Ahsanulla  (q.v.\  born  1846. 

Residence. — Dacca,  Bengal. 

ABDUL  GHANI,  MAULAVI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

An    Extra  Assistant    Commissioner  of  the   Punjab.     Created  a   Khan 
Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Punjab. 

ABDUL  HAKIM,  MUNSHI,  Khdn  Saheb. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893,  for 
eminent  services  at  Gilgit. 

Residence. — Gilgit,  Kashmir. 


ABDUL  HAKK,  SAYYID,  C.I.B.,  Sarddr  Diler  Jang  Bahddur. 

The  Sardar,  who  is  a  descendant  of  the  Karnal  family,  was  in  early  life 
in  the  British  service,  and  obtained  the  Companionship  of  the  Indian 
Empire  for  distinguished  service  in  the  Police.  He  was  lent  by  the  British 
Government  to  the  Government  of  His  Highness  the  Nizam,  attained  very 
high  office  in  the  latter  service,  and  was  rewarded  by  the  titles  of  Sarddr 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


Diler  Jang  Bahadur,  and  subsequently  of  Sarddr  Diler-ud-dauld  Bahadur; 
and  the  former  of  these  titles  was  recognised  by  the  British  Government  as 
a  personal  distinction. 

Residence. — Hyderabad  and  Bombay. 

ABDUL  HAKK,  MAULAVI,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title^is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  It 
entitles  the  Maulavi  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 

ABDUL  HAKK,  MAULAVI  (of  Khairabad),  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  It 
entitles  the  Maulavi  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Sitapur,  Oudh. 

ABDUL  HUSAIN  KHAN,  MIR  (of  Tando  Mir),  His  Highness. 

Born  1 3th  May  1850.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  in  recog- 
nition of  his  position  as  grandson  of  the  Amir,  who  was  the  ruler  of  Sind  at 
the  time  of  the  annexation. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

ABDUL  ISLAM  BIN  ADAM,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  May  1880. 
Residence. — Na"sik,  Bombay. 

ABDUL  JABBAR,  MAULAVI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  is  a  Deputy  Magistrate  of  the  24-Parganas  at 
Calcutta,  and  having  rendered  excellent  service  in  that  capacity,  received 
the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Calcutta. 

ABDUL  KADIR,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

As  the  term  Sayyid  implies,  this  gentleman  claims  to  be  descended  from 
the  Prophet.  He  is  a  descendant  of  the  old  Nawabs  of  the  Carnatic ;  and 
his  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  was  recognised  by  the  Government  in  December 
1890. 

Residence. — Madras. 

ABDUL  KADIR,  HAFIZ,  Khan. 

The  Khan  is  sometimes  styled  Wajih-ulla-Khan-i-Hal ;  his  title,  which  is 
personal,  was  conferred  by  the  Carnatic  Nawab,  but  was  recognised  by 
Government  in  1890. 

Residence. — Madras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ABDUL  KADIR  KHAN  walad  ALI  GAUHAR  KHAN,  MIR. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shika"rpur,  Sind. 


ABDUL  KARIM,  SHAIKH  HAFIZ,  C.I.E.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1838.  The  title  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1884,  for  services 
rendered  by  his  ancestors,  and  for  his  own  acts  of  public  generosity.  His 
father  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Bharatpur,  Kamon,  and  Shekhawati  in 
the  first  Kabul  campaign ;  and  his  brother  was  rewarded  by  a  khilat  for  his 
services  in  the  first  and  second  Punjab  campaigns.  The  Khan  Bahadur  is  a 
large  landed  proprietor  in  the  district  of  Meerut,  North- Western  Provinces ; 
and  has  been  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire,  2ist  May  1890. 

Residence. — Meerut,  North- Western  Provinces. 


ABDUL  LATIF,  C.I.E.,  Nawdb  Bahddur. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  was  born  in  March  1828.  He  traces  his  descent 
from  the  celebrated  Generalissimo  of  Islam,  Khalid  Ibn  Walid,  entitled  the 
"  Sword  of  God,"  who  died  in  the  twenty-first  year  of  the  Hijrah.  Shah 
Ain-ud-din  of  Baghdad  was  the  first  member  of  the  family  to  settle  in  India. 
His  descendant,  Kazi  Abdur  Rasul,  was  made  Kazi  by  the  Emperor  of 
Delhi,  and  sent  to  Faridpur  in  Bengal,  where  the  family  settled.  A 
descendant,  Kazi  Fakir  Muhammad,  was  a  leading  pleader  of  the  Sadar 
Diwdni  and  Nizdmat  Addlat  at  Calcutta  ;  and  was  a  great  oriental  scholar, 
being  the  author  of  several  works,  of  which  the  chief  was  the  Persian  Jdmi- 
ut-Tawdrikh  or  "  Universal  History."  He  was  the  father  of  the  subject  of  the 
present  notice;  who  entered  the  Government  service  in  1846,  and  after 
some  service  in  the  Educational  Department  in  the  Dacca  College  and  the 
Calcutta  Madrasa,  became  a  Deputy  Magistrate  of  the  24-Parganas  in 
1849.  Was  appointed  J.P.  for  Bengal,  Behar,  and  Orissa,  1852.  Acted  for 
a  short  time  as  Police  Magistrate  of  Calcutta,  and  has  served  three  times  as 
a  Member  of  the  Bengal  Legislative  Council.  Has  been  a  Member  of  the 
Board  of  Examiners  since  1860;  has  also  been  Member  of  the  Central 
Examination  Committee.  One  of  the  Income -Tax  Commissioners  for 
Calcutta,  1861-65.  Fellow  of  the  Calcutta  University,  1863.  In  1867 
received  from  Government  a  gold  medal,  and  a  set  of  the  new  edition  of  the 
Encyclopedia  Britannica^  with  an  autograph  inscription  by  the  Viceroy  :  "  In 
recognition  of  his  services  in  promoting  native  education,  especially  the 
education  of  those  who  like  himself  belong  to  the  Muhammadan  religion." 
In  1869  appointed  one  of  the  Commissioners  to  enquire  into  the  state  of 
the  Calcutta  and  Hughli  Madrasas,  and  received  the  thanks  of  Government 
for  this  work.  Is  a  J.P.  and  Municipal  Commissioner  for  Calcutta,  and  also 
for  the  suburbs ;  Member  of  the  Board  of  Management  of  the  Reformatory, 
and  of  the  District  School  Committee,  24-Parganas.  Founder  and  Secretary 
of  the  Muhammadan  Literary  Society  of  Calcutta,  established  April  1863; 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


Hon.  Secretary,  Bengal  Social  Science  Association ;  Member  of  the 
Philological  Committee  of  the  Asiatic  Society  of  Bengal ;  a  Trustee  of  the 
Indian  Association  for  Cultivation  of  Science ;  Member  of  Committee  of 
Albert  Hall,  also  of  the  District  Charitable  Society.  Received  the 
Companionship  of  the  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  ist  January  1883.  Was 
created  a  Nawab  Bahadur  in  consideration  of  his  eminent  position  and  dis- 
tinguished public  services  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty's  reign,  1887.  He  has  two  sons — Abul  Fazl  Muhammad  Abdur- 
rahman, Esquire,  Barrister-at-law  of  the  High  Court,  Calcutta ;  Abul  Khair 
Muhammad  Abdus-Subhan,  Khan  Bahadur 
Residence. — 16  Toltollah  Lane,  Calcutta. 


ABDUL  LATIF  AGHA  JOHAR,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal;  was  conferred  by  the  Carnatic  Nawab,  and 
recognised  by  Government  i6th  December  1890.  The  Khan  Bahadur  also 
bears  the  Carnatic  titles  of  Asad  Jang  Said-ud-daula. 

Residence. — Arabia. 


ABDUL,  LATIP  LONDB,  KAZI,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888,  for 
eminent  oriental  scholarship.  It  entitles  the  Kazi  to  rank  in  Darbar  immedi- 
ately after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Bombay. 


ABDUL  MAHMUD  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Has  done  good  service  in  the  Medical  Department,  Bengal ;  and  received 
the  title  on  ist  January  1891,  as  a  personal  distinction. 
Residence. — Calcutta. 

ABDUL  (ABDUR)  RAHIM  HAKIM,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  April  1882. 
Residence.  — Bushire. 

ABDUL  (ABDUR)  RAHIM,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890,  for  good 
service  in  the  Medical  Department. 
Residence. — Bengal. 

ABDUL  (ABDUR)  RAHIM  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Bannu,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ABDUL  (ABDUR)  RAHMAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  is  a  Deputy  Commissioner  in  the  district  of  Shimoga, 
Mysore,  under  the  government  of  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Mysore,  and 
received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Shimoga,  Mysore. 

ABDUL  (ABDUR)  RAUF,  MAULAVI,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890,  for  distinc- 
tion in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately 
after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Patna,  Bengal. 

ABDUL  (ABDUR)  RAZZAK,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is   personal,   and  was   conferred  on    ist  June  1888,  for  dis- 
tinguished medical  service. 
Residence. — Jeddah. 

ABDUL  (ABDUS)  SAMAD,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 

ABDUL  VASA,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1843;  a  member  of  the  Carnatic  family,  being  the  son-in-law  of 
His  late  Highness  Zahir-ud-daula,  the  second  of  the  titular  Princes  of  Arcot ; 
was  granted  the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  in  1875. 

Residence. — M  adras. 

ABDUL  WAHAB,  MAULAVI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887.  The 
Maulavi's  ancestors  are  said  to  have  come  from  Kandahar  in  the  loth 
century,  and  to  have  settled  at  Delhi.  The  family  afterwards  removed  to 
Echoli  in  the  Meerut  district ;  and  one  of  his  ancestors  having  been  killed  by 
Ragbars  in  the  i  yth  century,  his  heirs  were  granted  the  village  of  Echoli  by 
firman  of  the  Emperor  of  Delhi.  In  course  of  time  this  grant  passed  into 
the  hands  of  the  Rani  of  Landhaura.  Abdul  Wahab  has  rendered  very 
distinguished  service  in  the  Police  Department,  and  has  been  publicly  com- 
mended and  rewarded  on  many  occasions.  He  is  District  Superintendent  of 
Police  at  Ballia. 

Residence. — Meerut,  North- Western  Provinces. 

ABDUL  WAHAB,  HAJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

This  gentleman  (who,  as  the  title  of  Hdji  implies,  has  performed  the 
Haj  or  Pilgrimage  to  Mecca)  is  connected  with  the  Carnatic  family ;  and 
his  title,  conferred  by  the  Carnatic  Nawab,  was  recognised  by  Government 
as  a  personal  one  in  1890. 

Residence. — M  adras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ABDULLA  walad  GHULAM  MURTAZA  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Chiefs 
of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ABDULLA  KHAN,  Nawdb. 

The  titfe  is  hereditary,  and  the  Nawab  Abdulla  Khan  was  specially 
selected  to  succeed  to  it  in  August  1881.  The  title  had  been  recognised 
3oth  July  1875. 

Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Kha"n,  Punjab, 

ABDULLA  KHAN,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Sibi,  Baluchistan. 

ABDULLA  KHAN,  Khan  Sahtf. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Ajmir,  Rajputdna. 

ABDUS  SUBHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  in  1849 )  nas  been  granted  the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  for 
good  service  under  the  Police  Department  of  Madras. 
Residence. — Madura,  Madras  Presidency. 

ABDUS  SUBHAN,  SAYYID,  CHAUDHRI,  Nawdb. 
Granted  the  title  of  Nawab,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Bogra,  Bengal. 

ABHAI  CHANDRA  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  23rd  May  1888,  for  good 
service  as  Deputy  Magistrate  and  Deputy  Collector  of  the  24-Parganas. 
Residence. — 10  Shama  Charan  Dey's  Street,  Calcutta. 

ABHAI  CHARAN  MITTBR,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Abhai  Charan  Mitter  is  a  descendant  of  the  Mitter  family  of  Charimandel 
in  Vikrampur,  Dacca,  originally  imported  from  Rarh  and  stated  to  have  been 
located  in  Charimandel  by  Chand  Rai  and  Kedar  Rai,  the  ruling  Kayastha 
Sabas  of  Vikrampur.  He  is  ninth  in  descent  from  Devaki  Nandan  Mitter, 
who  first  migrated  to  Charimandel.  Born  on  the  i2th  May  1839.  His 
father's  name  was  Ram  Kinker  Mitter.  He  did  meritorious  service  in  the 
first  Lushai  Expedition,  *both  as  an  explorer  and  as  a  contractor  for 
transport ;  and  was  kept  for  some  time  as  a  hostage  by  the  Lushais.  His 
services  were  equally  valuable  to  Government  in  the  last  Chin -Lushai 
Expedition,  when  he  supplied  boats,  coolies,  and  other  means  of  transport, 
notwithstanding  the  difficulties  caused  by  a  severe  outbreak  of  cholera.  Was 
rewarded  with  the  title  on  ist  January  1891. 

Residence. — Chittagong  Hill  Tracts. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ABID  ALI  BAHADUR,  KAMR  KADR  MIRZA,  Prince. 
This  is  the  courtesy  title  of  the  eldest  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

ABINAS  CHANDRA  BANERJI,  Rat  Bahadur. 

Born  1 846.  Son  of  Babu  Navin  Chandra  Banerji,  of  Bali,  in  the  district  of 
Howrah,  Bengal.  Educated  in  the  Free  Church  Institution,  Calcutta ;  entered 
the  service  of  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Patiala,  1866;  appointed 
Director  of  Public  Instruction,  1869;  A.D.C.  and  Private  Secretary  to  His 
Highness,  1875  ;  worked  for  the  organisation  of  the  Bali  Sadharani  Sabha,  a 
Public  Association  recognised  by  the  Government,  and  made  Secretary  thereof, 
1882.  In  1883  was  elected  Vice-Chairman  of  the  Bali  Municipality.  In 
1887,  on  the  occasion  of  Her  Majesty's  Jubilee,  received  the  title  of  Rai 
Bahadur  for  good  service;  elected  Chairman  of  the  Bali  Municipality  in 
1890.  Is  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Bali,  Howrah,  Bengal. 

ABU  SAID,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

A  member  of  the  Carnatic  family,  and  styled  Zahir-ud-din  Khan  Baha- 
dur. The  title  was  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  and  was  recog- 
nised as  a  personal  one  by  Government  in  1890. 

Residence. — Madras. 

ABU  TURAB  PARRUKH  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 
This  is  the  courtesy  title  of  the  fifteenth  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

ABUBAKR,  BBARI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd 
January  1893. 

Residence. — Mangalore,  Madras. 

ABUL  ALI  DARAGAH  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 
This  is  the  courtesy  title  of  the  twentieth  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

ABUL  HASAN,  MAULAVI,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  for 
eminence  as  an  oriental  scholar.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  im- 
mediately after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

:  ABUL  KHAIR  MUHAMMAD  ABDUS-SUBHAN,  MAULAVI, 

Khdn  Bahadur. 

Son  of  Nawab  Abdul  Latif  Khan  Bahadur,  C.I.E.,  of  Calcutta. 
Born  27th  September  1857.  Traces  his  descent  from  the  celebrated 
Generalissimo  of  Islam,  Khalid  Ibn  Walid,  entitled  the  "  Sword  of  God,"  who 
died  in  the  twenty-first  year  of  the  Hijrah.  Shah  Ain-ud-din  of  Baghdad,  a 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


most  learned  saint,  came  to  India  first.  Kazi  Abdur  Rasul  was  made  Kazi 
by  the  Court  of  Delhi  and  sent  to  Bengal,  and  the  family  settled  in  the 
Faridpur  district.  Kazi  Fakir  Muhammad,  one  of  his  descendants,  was  a 
leading  pleader  of  the  Sadar  Diwdni  and  Nizdmat  Addlat  at  Calcutta,  and 
was  a  great  oriental  scholar,  being  the  author  of  several  works,  chief  among 
which  was  an  universal  history  in  Persian,  called  the  Jdmi-ut-Tawdrikh. 
His  son  is  the  Nawab  Abdul  Latif  Bahadur  (q.v.\  the  father  of  the  sub- 
ject of  thetpresent  notice.  The  Khan  Bahadur  was  educated  at  the  Cal- 
cutta Madrasa  and  the  Presidency  College,  Calcutta,  where  he  was  a 
scholar,  prizeman,  and  medallist.  Received  the  title  of  "  Khan  Bahadur " 
with  his  appointment  as  a  Deputy  Magistrate  and  Deputy  Collector,  on  the 
loth  September  1884.  Vested  with  first-class  Magisterial  powers,  1888; 
appointed  Secretary  of  the  District  Committee  of  Public  Instruction  at  Arrah 
(Shahabad),  1886;  a  Member  and  Vice -Chairman  of  the  District  Board, 
Champarun,  1887;  and  a  Municipal  Commissioner  of  Patna,  1891.  Married, 
24th  August  1889,  Bibi  Najmoon-Neesa  Khanum,  fourth  daughter  of 
Chowdhry  Muhammad  Rasheed  Khan,  Khan  Bahadur  of  Nattore,  district 
Rajshahi. 

Residence. — Gya,  Bengal. 

ACHAL  SINGH  (of  Kaimahra),  Rdjd. 

Born  1 5th  June  1880,  and  succeeded  Raja  Narpat  Singh  in  1886.  The 
title  is  hereditary.  The  Raja  of  Kaimahra  represents  the  elder  branch  of  the 
Janwar  family,  the  Raja  of  Oel  representing  the  junior  branch.  They  were 
originally  Chauhan  Kshatriyas  in  the  service  of  the  Sayyids  of  Pihani,  having 
migrated  from  Rajputana  in  the  i6th  century.  In  the  time  of  Sayyid 
Khurd,  in  1553,  their  ancestor  Jamni  Khan  obtained  the  post  of  Chaudhri 
of  Kheri,  with  the  right  to  levy  a  cess  on  all  the  lands  in  that  Pargana.  At 
a  later  period,  when  Than  Singh  was  head  of  the  family,  he  lived  at  Oel,  with 
the  title  of  Rai.  Ajab  Singh,  who  was  the  uncle  and  predecessor  of  the 
grandfather  of  the  present  Raja,  in  1837  was  acknowledged  as  Raja  by  the 
tribe,  and  the  title  was  confirmed  as  hereditary  in  1864.  Sleeman  states 
that  the  Raja  of  Oel  attempted  to  seize  the  estates  of  his  kinsman,  Jodha 
Singh  of  Kaimahra,  grandfather  of  the  present  Raja.  The  mother  of  the 
latter  is  the  Rani  Ranikunwar. 

Residence. — Kheri,  Oudh. 


ADARJI  JAMSHBDJI,  Khdn  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  October  1885. 
Residence. — B  ombay . 

AFGHANISTAN,  His  Highness  the  Amir  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

His  Highness  Sir  Abdur  Rahman  Khan,  G. C.S.I.,  Amir  of  Afghanistan, 
was  born  about  the  year  1843,  and  was  placed  on  the  throne  by  the  British 
authorities  on  the  22nd  July  1880.  He  is  a  younger  son  of  the  late  Amir 
Sher  Ali  Khan,  Amir  of  Kabul,  and  lived  for  some  years  as  an  exile,  but  was 


io  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

brought  back  after  the  last  Afghan  war.     The  area  of  the  State  is  about 
270,000    square   miles;  its  population  about   4,901,000,   chiefly   Muham- 
madans.     His  Highness  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  2 1  guns ;  and  maintains  a 
military  force  of  19,500  cavalry,  40,408  infantry,  and  210  guns. 
Residence. — Kabul. 


AGAR  (RBWA  KANTHA),  THAKUR  GAMBHIR  &INGH, 

Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1867;  is  a  Muhammadan  of  Rajput  descent.     The  area  of 
the  State  is  about  9  square  miles ;  its  population  consists  chiefly  of  Bhils. 
Residence. — Agar,  Rewa"  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


AGRA  BARKHBRA  (BHOPAL),  BALWANT  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Thakur  Balwant  Singh  is  a  Rajput  Chief  (Hindu),  born  about  the  year 
1827.  He  succeeded  to  the  title,  which  is  hereditary,  on  the  9th  July  1859. 
The  population  of  the  State,  which  is  situated  in  the  Bhopal  Agency,  Central 
India,  is  about  4200,  and  consists  chiefly  of  Hindus. 

Residence. — Agra  Barkhera,  Bhopal,  Central  India. 

AHMAD,  MAULAVI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890  "for  loyalty 
and  public  spirit." 

Residence. — 70  Toltollah  Lane,  Calcutta,  Bengal. 

AHMAD  ALI  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  has  rendered  good  service  on  the  Survey  of  India, 
and  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th  May  1892. 
Residence. — Calcutta. 


AHMAD  BAKHSH,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1815.  Son  of  Tir  Bakhsh,  who  was  in  the  service  of  the  Raja  of 
Nagpur ;  and  whose  ancestor,  Malik  Bal  Lai,  settled  in  the  Fatehpur  district 
in  the  reign  of  Shahab-ud-din  Ghori.  The  Khan  Bahadur  served  in  the 
Bengal  Light  Cavalry  from  the  year  1830;  and  took  part  in  the  campaign 
against  the  Bhils  in  1832,  and  in  the  Afghan  war  in  1839.  He  went  through 
the  Kabul  campaigns,  and  joined  in  the  pursuit  of  Dost  Muhammad.  For 
his  loyalty  during  the  Mutiny  he  was  rewarded  with  a  khtlat,  a  jdgtr  (grant 
of  lands),  and  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur,  which  was  conferred  on  him 
January  1866. 

Residence. — Fatehpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  II 


AHMAD  GURIKAL,  MANJBRI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1825  ;  granted  the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  for  good  service 
in  the  Madras  Police,  from  which  he  retired  on  pension  in  1888. 

Residence.  —  Malabar,  Madras  Presidency. 


AHMAD  HASAN  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

Son  of  the  Nawab  Kalb  Ali  Khan,  and  a  grandson  of  the  late  Saadat  AH 
Khan,  King  of  Oudh.     The  title  is  personal. 

Residence.  —  Lucknow,  Oudh. 


AHMAD  HUSAIN  KHAN,  Nawdb  (of  Fatehpur}. 

Born  1826.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  family  originally  came  from 
Teheran;  its  founder,  Sayyid  Ikram-ud-din  Ahmad,  accompanied  the 
Emperor  Humayiin  on  his  return  from  Persia,  took  service  under  the  Delhi 
emperors,  and  was  appointed  a  mansabddr  by  the  great  Akbar.  His  great- 
grandson,  Muhammad  Taki,  was  in  office  under  the  Emperor  Alamgir,  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  Shah  Kuli  Khan.  The  grandson  of  the  latter, 
Nawab  Zain-ul-Abdin  Khan,  came  to  Oudh,  was  appointed  chakladdr  of 
Sarkars  Kora  and  Kara  under  the  Oudh  Government,  and  obtained  extensive 
jdgirs  in  the  district  of  Fatehpur  from  the  Nawab  Asaf-ud-daula.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  Nawab  Bakar  Ali  Khan,  who  transferred  his  head- 
quarters from  Kora  Jahanabad  to  Fatehpur.  He  was  succeeded  by  his 
brother,  Nawab  Sayyid  Muhammad  Khan,  the  father  of  the  present  Nawdb. 
The  Nawab  has  two  sons — Ali  Husain  Khan  and  Bakar  Husain  Khan. 

Residence. — Bdkarganj,  Fatehpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


AHMAD  HUSAIN  KHAN  (of  Pariawan),  SHAIKH, 
Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1865  ;  succeeded  1877.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred 
4th  December  1877,  on  Dost  Muhammad  of  Pariawan,  on  account  of  his 
services  in  the  Mutiny.  The  founder  of  the  family  is  said  to  have  been 
Haji  Abdul  Rauf,  who  migrated  from  Mecca  to  Ghazni,  accompanied 
Shahab-ud-din  Ghori  when  he  invaded  India,  and  obtained  the  estate  of 
Pariawan,  consisting  of  eight  villages,  revenue  free,  for  services  rendered. 
Revenue  was,  however,  assessed  in  the  time  of  Nawab  Saadat  Ali  Khan. 
Shaikh  Gulam  added  to  the  estate  by  purchases,  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
son,  Haji  Shaikh  Dost  Muhammad  (see  above),  who  did  good  service  in  the 
Mutiny,  went  on  pilgrimage  to  Mecca,  and  died  at  Medina.  Succeeded  by 
his  son,  the  present  Khan  Bahadur,  who  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate.  He 
has  issue,  two  daughters. 

Residence. — Paridwan,  Partdbgarh,  Oudh. 


12  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


AHMAD  KHAN  walad  MUHAMMAD  HUSAIN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  as  being  that  of  a  descendant  of  the  ancient  Mirs 
of  Sind. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


AHMAD  KHAN,  JAMADAR,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. —  nth  Bengal  Lancers,  India. 


AHMAD  KHAN,  SAYYID,  C.I.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1888. 
Residence. — 


AHMAD  MUHI-UD-DIN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Son  of  Ibruth  Jang  Bahadur,  by  a  niece  of  the  Hon.  Sir  Sharful  Umra 
Bahadur,  K. C.S.I. ;  born  1835;  married,  1864,  to  the  second  daughter  of 
His  Highness  Nawab  Zahir-ud-daula,  G.C.S.I.,  second  Prince  of  Arcot. 
Created  Khan  Bahadur,  1874.  Claims  close  connection,  on  both  father's  and 
mother's  sides,  with  the  Nawabs  Rulers  of  the  Carnatic.  Was  present  at  the 
Imperial  Assemblage,  Delhi,  as  a  member  of  the  Prince  of  Arcot's  suite ; 
Secretary  to  the  Prince  of  Arcot,  1877  to  1883.  Was  delegated  to  the 
Hyderabad  Court,  in  1884,  by  the  Muslim  community,  Madras,  for  present- 
ing a  congratulatory  address  to  His  Highness  the  Nizam,  on  his  accession  to 
the  masnad.  A  member  of  the  Madras  Muhammadan  Library.  Founder  of 
the  Aujuman-i  Islarniah  of  Madras ;  which  afterward  was  amalgamated  with 
the  Madras  Central  Muhammadan  Association,  when  he  was  elected  as  a 
Vice-President  of  the  latter.  Vice -President  of  the  Aujuman-i  Himayat-i- 
Islam,  Madras.  Founder  of  the  Muslim  Herald,  the  first  Muhammadan- 
English  tri-weekly  paper  in  India,  which,  though  not  now  existing,  was 
remarkable  for  its  loyal  spirit  and  moderate  tone. 

Residence. — Mylapur  and  Adyar,  Madras. 


AHMAD  MUHI-UD-DIN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  is  a  member  of  the  Carnatic  family,  being  a  son-in- 
law  of  His  late  Highness  Zahir-ud-daula,  the  second  of  the  titular  Princes  of 
Arcot.  He  was  born  in  1842,  and  was  granted  the  personal  title  in  1875. 

Residence. — M  adras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  13 


AHMAD  SHAH  SAYYID  (of  Sardhana),  Nawdb. 

Born  ist  January  1835  ;  succeeded  in  1882.  The  family  are  Muswi  or 
Mashadi  Sayyids,  descended  from  Hayat  AH  Musa  Raza,  and  originally 
residing  at  Paghman  near  Kabul.  On  account  of  services  rendered  to 
Alexander  Barnes  in  his  Kabul  mission,  and  subsequently  to  the  English  in 
their  retreat  from  Kabul,  they  were  expelled  from  Kabul  and  settled  at 
Sardhana,.,  At  the  time  of  the  Mutiny,  the  head  of  the  family,  Sayyid 
Muhammad  Jan  Fishan,  Khan  Saheb,  took  the  side  of  the  Government  at 
once.  When  the  Mutiny  occurred  at  Meerut,  he  raised  a  body  of  horse, 
consisting  of  his  followers  and  dependents,  and  officered  by  himself  and  his 
relatives ;  accompanied  General  Wilson's  force  to  the  Hindan ;  was  present 
in  both  actions,  and  thence  to  Delhi,  where  he  remained  with  the  head- 
quarters camp  till  the  city  was  taken,  when  his  men  were  employed  to  keep 
order  in  Delhi.  For  these  eminent  services  the  title  of  Nawab,  with  a  suit- 
able khilat,  was  conferred  on  him.  And  each  of  his  successors  have  received 
the  title  of  Na"wab  for  life  on  succeeding  to  the  estates. 

Residence. — Sardhana,  North-Western  Provinces. 

AHMAD-ULLA  KHAN,  Nawdb. 

Born  1 6th  December  1827.  The  title  was  conferred  on  26th  February 
1885.  The  family  claims  descent  from  the  Nawab  Dadan  Khdn,  a  Governor 
of  the  Punjab.  One  of  its  most  illustrious  ancestors  was  Nawab  Muhammad 
Khan,  who,  on  account  of  his  loyal  services,  received  the  title  of  Khairandesh 
Khan  from  the  Emperor  Alamgir.  The  Nawab  Ahmad-ulla  Khan  served 
the  British  Government  for  twenty-eight  years  as  a  Patrol  in  the  Customs 
Department,  and  retired  on  pension  in  1877 — having  distinguished  himself 
for  his  fidelity  during  the  Mutiny,  when  he  was  wounded  and  twice  robbed 
by  the  rebels.  He  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  of  the  first  class,  and  Vice- 
President  of  the  Meerut  Municipal  and  District  Boards ;  in  which  capacity 
he  has  been  distinguished  for  his  public  spirit. 

Residence. — Meerut,  North-Western  Provinces. 

AHMAD-UN-NISA  BEGAM  SAHIBA,  Nawdb. 

Grand-daughter  of   His   late   Highness  Azim-ud-daula",  the  first  of  the 
titular  Nawabs  of  the  Carnatic ;  granted  the  personal  title  of  Nawab,  1815. 
Residence. — Madras. 

AHMAD  YAR  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  has  occupied  an  important  position  in  the  police  of 
the  Quetta-Peshin  frontier,  and  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on 
25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Quetta,  Baluchistan. 

AHSANULLA,    THE    HON.  KHWAJA,  C.I.E.,  Nawdb. 

Son  and  heir  of  the  Nawab  (of  Dacca)  Khwaja  Sir  Abdul  Ghani,  K. C.S.I., 
to  whose  life  reference  may  be  made  for  particulars  of  the  family.  The 
Nawab  Ahsanulla,  who  was  born  in  1846,  has  long  managed  the  large  family 


I4  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

property,  and  has  followed  in  the  footsteps  of  his  father,  both  as  a  liberal 
and  enlightened  landlord,  and  in  his  large  public  benefactions.  His  sons 
are  Khwaja  Hafizulla  Khan  Bahadur  and  Khwaja  Salimulla  Khan  Bahadur. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  Bengal,  and  belongs  to  many 
other  public  bodies. 

Residence. — Dacca,  Bengal. 

AIYASWAMI    SASTRIYAR,  B.,  Rai  Bahadur.  "~ 

Born  1836;  was  granted  the  personal  title  in  1887,  for  good  service  in 
the  Madras  Revenue  Department. 

Residence. — Kumbhakonam,  Tanjore,  Madras. 

AJAIGARH,  BUNDELKHAND,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA 
SAWAI  RANJOR  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

His  Highness  was  bom  on  the  29th  September  1848,  and  succeeded  to 
the  Raj  on  the  9th  September  1859.  He  is  a  Bundela  Rajput,  descended 
from  the  famous  Maharaja  Chhatrasal  of  Panna  (q.v.)  The  second  son  of 
the  Maharaja  Chhatrasal  was  Jagat  Raj,  from  whom  are  descended  both  this 
Chief  and  the  Chiefs  of  Charkhari,  Bijawar,  and  Sarila.  His  great-grandson, 
Maharaja  Bakht  Singh  of  Banda  and  Ajaigarh,  received  a  sanad  from  the 
British  Government  in  1807;  and  Bakht  Singh's  great-grandson  is  the 
present  Maharaja.  Though  Sawai  was  an  old  family  title  it  was  not  recog- 
nised until  1877,  when  it  was  added  to  the  title  of  Maharaja  at  the  Delhi 
Imperial  Assemblage  on  the  occasion  of  the  proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India.  Ajaigarh  has  an  area  of  802  square  miles,  and  a  popu- 
lation of  81,454,  chiefly  Hindus.  His  Highness's  revenues  are  Rs.  2, 2  5,000. 
He  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  n  guns,  and  maintains  a  military  force  of  97 
cavalry,  544  infantry,  and  13  guns.  The  family  motto  is  Randhir  Ajai  Wir 
(The  Steadfast  in  War  is  an  Unconquered  Hero).  His  Highness  has  two 
sons — Raja  Bahadur  Bhopal  Singh,  aged  2  5  years ;  Diwan  Senapati  Jaipal 
Singh,  aged  17  years. 

Residence. — Ajaigarh,  Central  India. 

AJAMBAR   SINGH    DEO  (of  Anandpur),   Thdkur. 

Born  about  1832.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  recognised  by 
Government  on  i5th  February  1873.  The  Thakur  is  connected  with  the 
Porahat  family,  which  is  descended  (according  to  tradition)  from  a  Rajput  of 
Jodhpur  who  made  a  pilgrimage  to  Jagannath  about  twelve  or  thirteen 
centuries  ago.  His  son  is  Babu  Ajit  Narayan  Singh  Deo. 

Residence. — Singhbhum,  Bengal. 

AJRAUDA  (WESTERN  MALWA),  DAULAT  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Thakur  Daulat  Singh  was  born  about  the  year  1835,  and  succeeded  to 
the  title  in  1859.     He  is  a  Rajput  Chief  (Hindu). 
Residence. — Ajrauda,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


AKALKOT,  SHAHAJI  MALOJI,  alias  BABA  SAHEB  RAJB 

BHONSLB,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Rao  Saheb  Mehrban  Shahaji  Maloji  Raje  Bhonsle,  alias  Baba  Saheb,  is 
the   son  of  Maloji  Raje;  born   1867.     Is    a   descendant  of  the    Bhonsle 
family.     Educated  at  Rajaram  College,  Kolhapur.     Married,  1881,  Laxumi- 
bai  Saheb,  daughter  of  Dhaibar  Killedar  of  Baroda,  and  grand-daughter  of  His 
Highness  trfe  late  Maharaja  Khanderao  Bahadur  Gaekwar  of  Baroda.    Has  two 
daughters,  Guzra  Raje  and  Putala  Raje,  aged  six  and  three  respectively. 
His  accession  took  place  in   1870;  but  being  a  minor  the  management  of 
the  State  was  in  the  hands  of  the  British  Government  till  1891,  when  the 
administration  of  the  State  was  made  over  to  him.     His  step-grandmother  is 
the  Lady  Kamaljabai  Saheb,  widow  of  Shahaji  Raje  II.,  alias  Appa  Saheb. 
His  nearest  relation  is  his  second  cousin,  Tulaji  Raje  Bhonsle,  son  of  the 
late   Futtehsing,    uncle   to   the  late  Maloji  Raja.      Shahaji  Maloji,  Sambhaji 
Tulzaji,  and  Bhavanji  Raje  of  Kurla  are  the  great-grandsons  of  the  late  Tulzaji, 
brother  of  Futtehsing  II.     The  founder  of  the  family  was  Ranoji,  a  son  of  Sayaji 
Lokhanday  Patel  of  Parud  in  the  Sewari  Pargan£  of  the  province  of  Aurangabad, 
who,  without  being  formally  adopted,  was  taken  by  Sivaji,  better  known  as  Shao 
Rajcl  (the  son  of  Sambhaji  and  grandson  of  the  great  Sivaji),  into  his  family,  and 
had  the  family  surname  of  Bhonsle  of  the  Rajas  of  Satara  conferred  upon  him 
under  the  following  circumstances  :  After  the  death  of  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb, 
Shao  Raja  was  released  from  captivity  by  the  Emperor  Bahadur  Shah.      He  was 
on  his  return  to  the  Deccan,  and  had  encamped  at  Parud,  when  he  was  attacked 
by  Sayaji  Patel,  who  appears  to  have  been   a  partisan  of  the  famous  Tarabai 
(widow  of  Rajaram,  who  had   assumed   the   reins  of  government).      Sayaji  was 
defeated  and  was  killed  in  the  fight.     His  widow  took  her  three  little  boys  and 
threw  herself  at  the  feet  of  the  Raja,  imploring  his  forgiveness  and  his  protec- 
tion.    The   Raja  was  moved  with  compassion,  and  being  naturally  of  a  kind- 
hearted  disposition  conceived  the  idea  of  taking  care  of  the  eldest  of  the  children. 
He  told  the  mother  that  if  she  would  give  up  the  boy,  who  was  under  ten  years 
of  age,  he  would  provide  for  him,  and  she  gladly  gave  her  consent.     Ranoji  was 
a  good-looking  lad,  and  gained  the  favour  of  the  Raja.      It  happened  that  as  the 
Rajd,  continued  his  march  towards   Satara  some  resistance  was  offered  by  the 
Bhils  on  the  road,  and  it  was   necessary  to  disperse  them.     The  nominal  com- 
mand of  the  detachment  employed  on  this  occasion  was  given  to  the  boy.     The 
Bhils  were  defeated  and  dispersed,  and  the  Rajd  was  so  well  pleased  with  this 
fortunate  omen  of  the  child's  future  career  that  he  changed  his  name  to  Futteh- 
sing.    Futtehsing  grew  in   favour  and  remained  with  the  Rajd  at  his  Court  at 
Satara.     In  1710  the   Rajd  took  him   into  his  family  and  gave  him  the  family 
surname  of  Bhonsle,  and  later  conferred  on  him  the  Akalkot  State  as  an  heredi- 
tary jAgir.     Futtehsing  died  in  the  year  1760,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  adopted 
son  Shahaji  Raje  L,  alias  Baba  Saheb,  who  in  turn  was   succeeded  by  his  elder 
son,  Futtehsing  II.,  alias  Aba  Saheb  (the  younger  was  Tulaji,  who  was  granted 
the  village  of  Kurla  for  maintenance).     Futtehsing   II.  died  in    1822,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  Maloji  Raj£  L,  alias  Baba   Saheb,  who  was  succeeded  by 
his  son  Shahaji   Raje  II.,  alias  Appa  Saheb,  born  1821,  died  1857  (his  younger 
brother  was   Futtehsing).     Shahaji   Raje   II.  was   succeeded  by  his   son   Maloji 
Raja"    II.,   alias  Buwa   Saheb,  born    1838,   died    1870;  succeeded  by  his  son 
Shahaji  Raje  III.,  alias  Baba  Saheb,  the  present  chief.     The  area  of  the  State 
is  about  498  square  miles,  and  its  population  is  about  58,040,  chiefly  Hindus, 
though  there  are  nearly  8000  Muhammadans.     The  Chief  maintains  a  military 
force  of  46  men  and  7  guns. 

Residence. — Akalkot,  Bombay.  , 


16  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

AKBAR   ALI,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i5th  March  1887. 
Residence. — Sandra,  Bombay. 

AKBAR    ALI,  MIR,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  December 
Residence.  — B  ombay . 

AKBAR   ALI,  MIR,  C.S.I.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  originally  conferred  by  His  Highness  the 
Nizam  of  the  Deccan.  The  Khan  Bahadur  was  created  a  Companion  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  4th  January  1869. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Deccan. 

AKHIL  CHANDRA  MUKHARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January 
1893. 

Residence. — Calcutta. 

ALAGHASINQHARU   BHATTAR,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

Born  1817;  was  granted  the  personal  title  (entitling  him  to  rank  in 
Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas),  for  his  eminence  as  a  Sanskrit  scholar, 
on  1 5th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her 
Most  Gracious  Majesty. 

Residence. — Srirangam,  Trichinopoly,  Madras. 

ALAM    KHAN,  MIR,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  5th  September  1883,  for 
distinguished  military  service.  The  Khan  Bahadur  holds  the  high  rank  of 
Risaldar-Major  in  Her  Majesty's  Army. 

Residence. — With  ist  Punjab  Cavalry. 

ALAM  SHAH,   SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

ALBBL  SINGH  (of  Lidhran),  Sarddr. 

Born  in  1824.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  Sardar  is  descended 
from  Sardar  Jai  Singh,  who  joined  the  Nishanwala  mis  I  or  confederacy, 
which  opposed  Zain  Khan,  the  Governor  of  Sarhind,  who  was  slain  in  battle. 
The  family  did  good  service  during  the  Mutiny. 

Residence. — Ludhia"na,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  17 

ALI  AHMAD,  Khan  Bahadur, 

The    Khan   Bahadur,   who  is  also   styled   Iktidar  Jang  Afsar-ud-daula, 
Rafat-ul-Mulk,  derived  his  titles  from  the  Carnatic  Nawab ;    and  they  were 
recognised  by  Government  in  December  1890. 
Residence. — Madras. 
• 

ALI  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  Mir  is  descended  from  one  of  the  Mirs  of 
Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  BAHADUR  KHAN  (of  Saidpur),  Rdjd. 

The  Raja  is  a  Chib  Rajput  of  very  ancient  descent.  His  ancestor,  Chib 
Chand,  and  his  descendants  long  ruled  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Bhimbar ; 
and  one  of  the  latter,  Sadip  Chand,  adopted  the  Muhammadan  faith  in  the 
Court  of  the  Emperor  Babar,  and  was  confirmed  by  that  monarch  in  his 
possessions,  taking  the  name  of  Shadab  Khan.  This  Chief  accompanied  the 
Emperor  Humayun  on  many  of  his  expeditions,  and  was  at  length  killed 
in  a  quarrel.  A  descendant,  Raja  Sultan  Khan,  was  conquered  by  the 
Maharaja  Gulab  Singh  of  Jammu,  who  threw  him  into  prison,  where  he 
died.  After  the  first  Sikh  war,  as  the  British  Government  made  over 
Kashmir  (including  Bhimbar)  to  the  Maharaja  Gulab  Singh,  the  Raja  Talab 
Singh  removed  to  Saidpur,  where  the  family  has  since  been  settled.  The 
title  is  hereditary,  and  the  Raja's  son  is  named  Ali  Akbar  Khan. 

Residence. — Saidpur,  Jhelum,  Punjab. 

ALI  BAKHSH  walad  PAZL  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  DOST,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1829;  was  granted  the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  for  good 
service  in  the  Madras  Police  on  ist  January  1878;  retired  on  pension, 
1888. 

Residence. — North  Arcot,  Madras. 

ALI  DUT  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

c 


i8  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ALI  GAUHAR  walat  SHAH  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  as  in  the  last-mentioned  case,  and  for  the  same 
reason. 

Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  GAUHAR  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur.       c 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  Qth  June  1878. 
Residence. — Punjab. 

ALI  HAIDAR  walad  ALI  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  as  the  Mir  is  descended  from  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  HASAN  KHAN,  Amir-ud-dauld  Ihtisham-ul-Mulk,  Bahadur, 

Shujdat  Jang. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  originally  conferred  by  the  late  Muhammad 
Ali  Shah,  formerly  King  of  Oudh,  in  1837.  He  is  the  grandson  of  the  late 
Saadat  Ali  Khan,  King  of  Oudh ;  and  his  title  was  recognised  on  the  4th 
December  1877. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

ALI  HUSAIN  walad  ALI  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  as  the  Mir  is  descended  from  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shika'rpur,  Sind. 

ALI  HUSAIN  SARDAR  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  Prince  is  the  fourteenth  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh,  and  his  title 
is  a  courtesy  title,  personal  to  himself. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

ALI  HUSAIN  KHAN,  Shams-ud-dauld  Mukhtar-ul-Mulk, 
Bahadur,  Mustakim  Jang. 

Is  grandson  of  the  late  Saadat  Ali  Khan,  King  of  Oudh.  His  titles  were 
originally  conferred  by  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh ;  and 
were  recognised  by  Government,  4th  December  1877. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

ALI  JAN,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence.  — North- Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  19 


ALI  KHAN,  SAYYID,  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence.  —  Monghyr,  Bengal. 


MADAD  KHAN  walad  SOHRAB  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  as  the  Mir  is  descended  from  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence.  —  Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  MADAD  KHAN  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  H.H.  Mir,  Mir. 

Born  1835.     The  first  title  is  personal.     The  second  title  (Mir)  is  heredi- 
tary, as  His  Highness  is  descended  from  the  old  Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind. 
Residence.  —  Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  MARDAN  KHAN  walad  RUSTAM  KHAN,  Mir. 

Born  1  3th  July  1813.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  the  Suhra- 
bani  branch  of  the  Talpur  family,  formerly  Amirs  of  Sind,  being  the  son  of 
Mir  Rustam  Khan,  who  was  a  ruling  Amir  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
The  Mir  has  two  sons  —  Mehrab  Khan  and  Khudadad  Khan. 

Residence.  —  Hyderabad,  Sind. 

ALI  MAZHAR  SAHIB,  HAPIZ,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Connected  with  the  Carnatic  family  ;  was  granted  the  personal  title  on 
ist  June  1888. 

Residence.  —  Karur,  Madras. 


ALI  MUHAMMAD  KHAN  walad  SADIK  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 


ALI  MUHAMMAD  SHAD,  SAYYID,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Is  a  descendant  of  the  same  family  as  the  Nawab  Vilayat  AH  Khan, 
C.I.E.  (g.v.) ;  and  was  granted  the  title  on  ist  January  1891,  in  consideration 
of  his  social  position  and  learning. 

Residence. — Patna,  Bengal. 

ALI  MUHAMMAD,  Mirza. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     Is  the  son  of  Mirza  Khusro  Beg. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


20  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ALI  MURAD  KHAN  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

Born  ist  September  1835.  The  title  is  hereditary;  and  the  Mir  is  a 
son  of  the  Mir  Ahmad  Khan  of  the  Shahwani  branch  of  the  Talpur  family, 
formerly  Amirs  of  Sind. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

f 

ALI  NAWAZ  walad  SADIK  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 

ALI  NAWAZ  KHAN  walad  GHULAM  SHAH  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALI  NAWAZ  KHAN  walad  GHULAM  MURTAZA 
KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALIM  KHAN,  JAMADAR,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  for  good 
military  service,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty. 

Residence. — With  2Oth  Bengal  Infantry. 

ALIPURA,  CHHATARPATI,  C.S.I.,  Rao  Bahadur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Rao  of  Alipura  was  born  on  the  29:11  August  1853  ;  and  succeeded 
to  the  Raj  on  the  3rd  November  1871.  He  is  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  of  the 
Parihar  clan ;  and  is  descended  from  the  Rao  Mukund  Singh,  a  Sardar  of 
Panna,  whose  grandson,  Rao  Pratap  Singh,  received  a  sanad  from  the  British 
Government  in  1808.  The  old  title  of  the  family  was  Sewai  Rao;  but  Rao 
only  was  used  until  the  year  1877,  when  the  additional  title  of  Bahadur  was 
granted  as  a  personal  distinction  at  the  Delhi  Imperial  Assemblage,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  69  square  miles;  its  population  14,891,  chiefly  Hindus. 
The  Rao  Bahadur  was  created  a  C.S.I.  on  i5th  February  1887,  on  the  occa- 
sion of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  He  maintains 
a  military  force  of  6  cavalry,  277  infantry,  and  3  guns. 

Residence. — Alipura,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ALIRAJPUR,  RANA  PARTAB  SINGH,  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief  (ininor). 

The  Rana  Partab  Singh  is  a  minor.  He  was  born  about  the  year  1881, 
and  succeeded  to  the  Raj  on  the  i4th  February  1891.  He  is  a  Sisodiya 
Rajput,  said  to  be  descended  from  the  family  of  His  Highness  the 
Maharana  of  Udaipur.  The  area  of  the  State  is  836  square  miles ;  its 
population  is  56,827,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  nearly  19,000  Bhils. 
The  Rana  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns,  and  maintains  a  military  force 
of  ii  cavalry,  169  infantry,  and  7  guns. 

Residence. — Alirajpur,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 

ALLAH  BAKHSH  walad  ALI  BAKHSH,  Mir. 
Born  ist  October  1865.     The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  son  of 
Mir  AH  Bakhsh  of  the   Shahwani  branch  of  the  Talpur  family,    formerly 
Amirs  of  Sind. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

ALLAH  BAKHSH  walad  GHULAM  MURTAZA 
KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALLAH  BAKHSH  walad  GHULAM  HUSAIN  KHAN,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  for  the  same  reason  as  above. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALLAH  BAKHSH,  MUNSHI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction,  in  promo- 
tion from  that  of  Khan  Saheb,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Meshed. 

ALLAH  RAKHIO  walad  GHULAM  MURTAZA  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


ALLAHDAD  KHAN,  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  present  Nawab,  in  1889,  succeeded  his 
father,  Nawab  Sarfaraz  Khan,  C.  S.  I.  Sarbuland  Khan,  the  founder  of  the  family, 
and  the  first  Nawab  of  Mankerah,  was  an  Afghan  of  the  Saddozai,  a  ruling 
race  of  Kabul,  and  held  the  government  of  the  Derajat  under  the  Nawab  of 


22  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Multan.  Subsequently  he  obtained,  through  the  Kabul  Government, 
possession  of  the  Mankerah  territory,  and  took  up  his  residence  at  Bhakkar 
on  the  Indus.  On  his  death  in  1816  he  was  succeeded  by  Hafiz  Ahmad 
Khan,  his  daughter's  son,  who  was  the  great-grandfather  of  the  present 
Nawab.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Shah  Nawaz  Khan;  and  in  the 
latter's  time,  Ranjit  Singh,  after  the  conquest  of  Multan,  besieged  and  took 
Mankerah.  A  treaty  was,  however,  subsequently  concluded,  by  which  the 
Nawab  was  left  in  possession  of  a  considerable  territory.  He  wa£  succeeded 
by  his  son,  Nawab  Sarfaraz  Khan ;  and  the  latter  by  his  son,  the  present  t 
Nawab. 

Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Kha"n,  Punjab. 

ALLAHDAD  KHAN  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

ALLAHDAD  KHAN  walad  WALIDAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The. title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

ALLAHDAD  KHAN,  RAISANI,  MIE,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Khanak  and  Barkhan,  Baluchistan. 

ALTAP  HUSAIN,  SHAIKH  (of  Lucknow),  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1842.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2Qth  May 
1886.  The  Khan  Bahadur  is  a  son  of  the  late  Shaikh  Kasim  Ali,  who  was 
chakladdr  in  the  time  of  Amjad  Ali  Shah.  Is  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and 
Member  of  the  Municipal  and  District  Boards,  Cawnpur. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 

ALUMAL  TRIKAMDAS  BHOJVANI,  Rao  Saheb, 
Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence. — Karachi,  Sind. 

ALVA  (REWA  KANTHA),  THAKUR  RASUL  KHAN,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Was  born  about  the  year  1875,  and  is  a  Muhammadan  of  Rajput  descent. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  about  3  square  miles,  and  its  population  consists 
chiefly  of  aboriginal  Bhils. 

Residence. — Alva,  Rewd  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  23 


ALWAR,  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  Sawai  of. 

His  Highness  the  Maharaja  is  a  minor,  and  only  succeeded  to  the 
Raj  in  the  year  1892,  on  the  death  of  the  late  Maharaja,  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  Sawai  Sir  Mangal  Singh  Bahadur, 
G.C.S.I.  He  is  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  of  the  Naruka  clan,  and  is  descended 
from  Pratap  Singh,  Rao  of  Macheri.  The  latter,  on  becoming  Raja  of  Raj- 
tgarh,  took  the  title  of  Rao  Raja  of  Macheri;  and  subsequently,  on  bringing 
the  whole  of  Alwar  into  subjection,  he  assumed  the  title  of  Maharao 
Raja,  and  proclaimed  his  independence  in  1770  A.D.  The  family  was  an 
offshoot  from  the  ruling  family  of  Jaipur.  The  area  of  the  State  is  3024 
square  miles;  its  population  682,926,  chiefly  Hindus  (but  including  more 
than  150,000  Muhammadans).  His  Highness  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15 
guns,  and  maintains  a  military  force  of  2189  cavalry,  3676  infantry,  and  351 
guns.  The  revenue  of  the  State  is  Rs.  2  6, 5  8, 7  9  2. 

Residence. — Alwar,  Rajputdna. 


AMALA,  RAJA  RATAN  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Raja  was  born  about  the  year  1841,  and  is  of  Bhil  descent.  The 
State,  which  is  one  of  the  Dang  States,  in  Khandesh,  is  about  119  square 
miles  in  area ;  and  its  population,  which  consists  chiefly  of  Bhils,  Konknas, 
and  other  aboriginal  tribes,  is  about  5300. 

Residence. — Amala,  Khdndesh,  Bombay. 


AMAN  SINGH,  Rao. 

Born  1 4th  August  1876.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  traditional 
account  of  its  origin  is,  that  Raja  Chhatarsal  gave  the  village  of  Salaiyah  in 
Pargana  Panwari  in  dowry  to  Sabha  Singh,  Panwar  Thakur,  to  whom  the 
Raja's  daughter  was  married,  together  with  the  title  of  Rao,  which  the  family 
have  ever  since  enjoyed.  Rao  Aman  Singh's  grandfather  was  Rao  Nawal 
Singh. 

Residence. — Hamirpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


AMAN  SINGH  (of  Bhandra),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  derived  from  Raja  Nizam  Shah 
of  Mandla.  The  title  was  conferred  on  Raja  Nirpat  Singh,  grandfather  of 
the  present  Raja.  The  latter's  son  is  Kunwar  Hanman  Singh. 

Residence. — Bhandra,  Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


AMANAT  FATIMA  (of  Basitnagar),  Begam. 
See  Basitnagar. 


24  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


AMAB  CHAND,  Rdjd. 

The  Raja,  whose  family  is  of  Rajput  (Katoch)  origin,  succeeded  his 
father,  Raja  Sir  Jodbhir  Singh,  in  1873.  Sir  Jodbhir  Singh  was  brother-in- 
law  of  the  Maharaja  Ran  jit  Singh  of  Lahore,  and  was  created  a  Knight  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  and  granted  a  personal  salute  of  7 
guns,  by  the  Government.  He  has  several  sons,  of  whom  the  elc^sst  is  Mian 
Narindar  Singh. 

Residence. — Nadaun,  Kangra,  Punjab. 


AMAR  SINGH,  Rat. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  August  1859. 
Residence. — Muzaffarnagar,  North- Western  Provinces. 


AMAR  SINGH  (of  Ramgarh),  Midn. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  family  is  of  Rajput  origin,  and  claims 
descent  from  Singar  Chand,  Raja  of  Bilaspur  (Kahlur).  A  descendant  of 
Raja  Singar  Chand,  named  Khushal  Singh,  conquered  Ramgarh  and  the 
adjoining  territories,  and  built  a  fort  at  Ramgarh. 

Residence. — Rdmgarh,  Ambala,  Punjab. 


AMAR  SINGH,  Sarddr. 

Born  1858.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  family  is  of  Jat  origin,  and  is 
descended  from  Sardar  Sujan  Singh,  who  took  possession  of  Shahkot  and  ten 
neighbouring  villages  in  1759  on  the  decline  of  the  Mughal  Empire.  His 
successors  were  reduced  to  submission  by  Sardar  Fateh  Singh  Ahluwalia,  and 
subsequently  by  the  Maharaja  Ran  jit  Singh  of  Lahore. 

Residence. — Shdhkot,  Jdlandhar,  Punjab. 


AMAR  SINGH  (of  Balloki),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Jdlandhar,  Punjab. 

AMAR  SINGH  (of  Naugaza),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Jalandhar,  Punjab. 

AMAR  SINGH,  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Gujranwala,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  25 

AMAR  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Punjab. 


AMARBNDRA  KRISHNA  DEB,  Kumar. 

Fourth  son  of  the  late  Raja  Kali  Krishna  Deb  Bahadur,  and  a  de- 
scendant of  the  famous  Maharaja  Navakissen  Deb  Bahadur,  the  founder  of 
the  Sobha  Bazar  Raj  family  of  Calcutta. 

Residence. — No.  I  Raja"  Rally  Kissen's  Street,  Calcutta,  Bengal. 


AMBIKA  CHARAN  RAI,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Born  in  1827,  at  Behala,  near  Calcutta;  son  of  the  late  Bdbu  Durga 
Prasad  Rai.  Is  twelfth  in  descent  from  Raja  Gajendranath  Rai,  who  was  a 
Minister  in  the  Court  of  Delhi  in  the  reign  of  the  Emperor  Jahangir.  The 
family  was  settled  at  Anarpur  near  Dum-dum,  but  removed  to  Behala  to- 
wards the  close  of  the  last  century,  on  account  of  the  Mahratta  raids.  The 
Rai  Bahadur  entered  the  service  of  Government  in  1842,  and  in  1862  was 
appointed  Chief  Translator  of  the  Calcutta  High  Court,  Appellate  Side. 
Has  taken  an  active  and  enlightened  part  in  municipal  affairs,  especially  in 
connection  with  the  South  Suburban  Municipality,  of  which  he  has  been 
the  elected  Chairman  ever  since  the  introduction  of  the  elective  system. 
He  has  also  been  distinguished  for  public  benefactions,  in  the  building  of 
schools,  digging  of  tanks,  and  in  other  ways.  On  the  occasion  of  Her 
Majesty's  Jubilee  he  obtained  from  Government  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur, 
and  a  gold  medal  with  the  following  inscription  :  "  Presented  by  Govern- 
ment to  Umbica  Churn  Roy,  Zaminddr,  Chief  Translator,  High  Court,  and 
Chairman,  South  Suburban  Municipality,  with  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  in 
recognition  of  meritorious  and  faithful  services  to  the  State  and  Public. 
Presented  on  the  occasion  of  Her  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress's  Jubilee, 
1 6th  February  1887,  to  Umbica  Churn  Roy  of  Behala,  24-Pergunnahs." 
He  has  four  sons — Surendranath  Rai,  B.A.,  B.L.,  of  the  High  Court,  Cal- 
cutta ;  Satyendranath  Rai ;  Amarendranath  Rai ;  Devendranath  Rai. 

Residence. — Behala,  Bengal. 


AMETHI,  Rdjd  of.     See  Madho  Singh  of  Amethi. 

AMIN  CHAND  (of  Bijwara),  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1887.  The 
Sardar  Bahadur  served  for  many  years  under  the  Punjab  Government  as 
Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  and  Assistant  Settlement  Officer,  and  was 
subsequently  Judicial  Assistant  Commissioner  and  Judge  of  the  Small  Cause 
Court  of  Ajmir.  He  is  of  a  Khatri  family ;  his  son  is  Ram  Chand. 

Residence. — Bijwdra,  Hoshidrpur,  Punjab. 


26  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


AMIR  AHMAD,  SAYYID,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign,  for  eminent 
oriental  scholarship.  It  entitles  the  holder  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  im- 
mediately after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — North- Western  Provinces.  * 


AMIR  ALI,  THE  HON.  SAYYID,  C.I.E. 

Is  a  Puisne  Judge  of  the  High  Court  of  Calcutta.  He  was  created  a 
Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  1 5th  February 
1887,  in  recognition  of  his  position  as  an  eminent  member  of  the  Calcutta 
Bar.  Belongs  to  a  family  that  claims  descent  from  the  Prophet. 

Residence. — C  alcutta. 


AMIR  ALI,  SAYYID,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2ist  July  1877. 
Residence. — Delhi,  Punjab. 

AMIR  ALI  KHAN  walad  FAZL  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

AMIR  HASAN,  SAYYID,  Khdn. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 

Residence. — Allahabad,  North- Western  Provinces. 


AMIR  HUSAIN,  SAYYID,  C.I.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1888. 
Residence. — 

AMIR  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  JAMADAR,  Khdn  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign,  for  military 
services. 

Residence. — With  nth  Bengal  Lancers. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  27 


AMIR  SHAH,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th 
May  1892.  Is  an  Assistant  Surgeon  in  the  Medical  Service,  and  Lecturer  in 
Chemistry  in  the  Lahore  Veterinary  Surgeon. 

Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

AMIR,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence. — B  ombay . 

AM JAD  ALI,  SAYYID,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

Son  of  Sayyid  Anwar  Ali.  The  title  was  conferred  for  eminent  services 
in  the  Mutiny.  His  son  is  Sayyid  Kasim  Ali,  Honorary  Magistrate  of 
Delhi. 

Residence. — Delhi,  Punjab. 

AMLIYARA,  THAKUR  JALAMSINGHJI  AMARSINGHJI, 

Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur,  who  is  a  Hindu  of  Koli  (aboriginal)  descent,  was  born 
about  the  year  1860,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  23rd  April  1876. 
The  State  (which  is  in  Mahi  Kantha,  Bombay  Presidency)  contains  an  area 
of  about  157  square  miles,  and  a  population  (chiefly  Hindu)  of  12,437. 

Residence. — Amliydra,  Mcihi  Kcintha,  Bombay. 

AMRIK  SINGH,. CHHACHI,  Sarddr. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  son  of  Sardar  Nehal  Singh,  who 
married  the  only  daughter  of  Sardar  Gurmukh  Singh,  and  was  allowed  to  take 
the  name  of  Chhachi  and  to  succeed  to  his  father-in-law's  jdgir.  Sardar 
Nehal  Singh  did  valuable  service  to  Government  in  the  rebellion  of  1848; 
and  for  his  loyalty  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  received  an  additional  jdgir. 
In  1857  the  present  Sardar  (then  Amrik  Singh,  eldest  son  of  Sardar  Nehal 
Singh)  raised  a  risala  of  mounted  police  and  took  them  down  to  Oudh, 
where  they  did  excellent  service. 

Residence. — Rawalpindi,  Punjab. 

AMRIK  SINGH,  HASSANWALIA,  SARDAR,  Rai  Bahadur. 
Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January 
1893. 

Residence . — Punj  ab. 

AMULAK  SHIVDAS,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 


28  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

ANANDA  DIN,  Rat  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883. 
Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 

ANANDA  GAJAPATI  RAZ,  Mahdrdjd  Sir  P.,  G.CV.E. 
See  Vizianagram. 

ANANDATONAI  RAI,  Rdjd  Rai. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  not  to  have  been  formally  recognised 
by  Government.  It  was  originally  conferred  for  approved  service  by  the 
Emperor  of  Delhi.  The  earliest  Rajas  were  Raja  Pratapaditya  Rai  and  Raja 
Basanta  Kumar  Rai. 

Residence. — Khulna,  Bengal. 


ANANTA  CHARLU,  P.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1844  ;  is  an  advocate  of  the  High  Court,  Madras,  and  appointed 
Member  of  the  Madras  Municipal  Commission  in  1884.  Granted  the 
personal  title  in  1887. 

Residence. — Madras. 


ANTARJI  NARAYAN  KOTNIS,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890. 
Residence. — Vingurla,  Bombay. 

ANTHONY,  MATING,  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Legaing,  Burma. 

APJI  AMAR  SING-H,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Kotah,  Rajputdna. 

APPAJI  RAOJI,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  9th  April  1883. 
Residence. — Sholapur,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  29 


APPU  SASTRIYAR,  S.,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born    1855;    was  granted  the   personal  title   in    1889  for  services  to 
education. 

Residence. — Kumbhakonam,  Tanjore,  Madras. 

J 

ARGOT,  Prince  of.     See  Muhammad  Munawwar  AH,  Khdn  Bahadur^ 

Prince  of  Arcot. 


ARGOT,  THE  PRINCESS  OF,  Nawdb. 
The  title  is  a  personal  one,  recognised  in  1886. 
Residence. — Madras. 

ARDESAR  DORABJI  (of  Ahmadabad),  Khdn  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Ajmir. 

ARJUN  SINGH  (of  Chahal),  Sarddr. 

Born  1845  >  succeeded  his  father  Sardar  Joala  Singh  in  1852.  The  title 
is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  comes  of  a  Chahal  Jat  family.  Its  founder,  Katha 
Singh,  was  in  the  service  of  the  Bhangi  Sardars,  who  had  taken  possession  of 
Lahore  in  1764;  and  his  son  Karm  Singh,  on  the  overthrow  of  the  Bhangi 
chiefs,  took  service  with  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh,  and  ultimately  became 
one  of  his  most  powerful  Sardars.  He  was  killed  in  the  battle  of  Theri  on 
the  Yusufzai  border ;  and  his  eldest  son,  Sardar  Gurmukh  Singh,  died  of 
cholera  at  Kohat.  Sardar  Joala  Singh,  father  of  the  present  Sardar,  was  at 
this  time  only  four  years  old ;  so  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  resumed  many 
of  the  jdgirs  of  the  family. 

Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

ARUMUGAM  PILLAI,  M.,  Rao  Bahddur. 

Born  1860  ;  was  granted  the  personal  title  for  good  service  in  the  Madras 
Revenue  Department. 

Residence. — Ponneri,  Chengalpat,  Madras. 

ARUR  SINGH  (of  Naushahara  Nangal),  Sarddr. 

Of  a  Shergil  Jat  family.  The  title  is  hereditary ;  the  founder  of  the 
family  was  Sardar  Mirza  Singh,  who  joined  the  Kanahayya  confederacy. 
His  son,  Sardar  Kanh  Singh,  and  his  grandson,  Sardar  Jassa  Singh,  were  in 
the  service  of  the  Majithia  Chief. 

Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 


30  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ASAD  KHAN,  C.I.B.,  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  as  the  Sardar  is  the  Chief  of  the  Sarawan  Brahuis. 
He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1878. 

Residence. — Baluchistan. 

c 

ASAD-ULLA  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Meerut,  North-Western  Provinces. 

ASGHAR  ALI,  SAYYID,  C.S.I.,  Nawdb  Bahddur. 

Born  about  the  year  1831  ;  son  of  the  Nawab  Tahwar  Jang.  The  Sayyid 
is  the  descendant  and  representative  of  the  famous  Nawab  Muhammad  Reza 
Khan  Bahadur,  otherwise  known  as  Muzaffar  Jang,  the  Naib  Subahdar  of 
Bengal,  who  rendered  very  faithful  service  to  Government  in  the  time  of 
Lord  Clive.  The  title  of  Nawab  Bahadur  was  conferred  on  him  in  1862,  as 
a  personal  distinction,  "in  consideration  of  his  descent  from  a  noble  of 
historical  reputation,  his  father's  liberal  patronage  of  native  education,  and 
his  unblemished  reputation."  Has  been  a  Member  of  the  Bengal  Legislative 
Council,  and  a  Municipal  Commissioner  for  the  town  of  Calcutta.  Created 
C.S.I.  in  1866. 

Residence. — 156  Lower  Circular  Road,  Calcutta,  Bengal. 

ASGHAR  REZA,  SAYYID,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign.  Is  a  pro- 
minent Zdmindar  (landowner)  of  Krishnaganj  in  Purniah,  Bengal. 

Residence. — Purniah,  Bengal. 

ASHRAF-UD-DIN  AHMAD,  SAYYID,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

Mutawali  of  the  Hughli  Imambara.      Created  a  Khan   Bahadur,  as  a 
personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Hughli,  Bengal. 

ASKARAN,   SBTH,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence. — Raipur,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  31 

ASMAN  JAH  BAHADUR,  His  Excellency  the  Nawdb  Sir,  K.C.LE. 
Prime  Minister  of  the  Deccan. 

Born  in  1839.  Is  great-grandson  of  Mir  Nizam-tid-din  Khan,  the  second 
Nizam  of  the  Deccan ;  and  one  of  the  three  Premier  Nobles  of  the  Hydera- 
bad State,  known  as  the  illustrious  Shamsiya  family.  His  Excellency's  family 
name  is  Mohammad  Mazahr-ud-din  Khan,  and  his  full  titles  are  Rafath 
Jang,  Bashir-ud-daula,  Umdat-ul-Mulk,  Azam-ul-Umara,  Amir-i-Akbar,  Asman 
Jah  Bahadur.  The  Begam  Bashir-un-Nissa  Sahiba,  daughter  of  the  second 
Nizam,  was  married  to  the  Nawab  Tej  Jang,  Shams-ul-Umara,  Amir-i-Kabir ; 
and  the  sons  of  this  royal  marriage  were  the  Nawab  Muhammad  Sultan-ud- 
din  Khan  Sabkat  Jang,  Bashir-ul-Mulk  (father  of  His  Excellency),  and  the 
Nawab  Muhammad  Rafi-ud-din  Khan  Umdat-ul-Mulk.  The  former  died 
before  his  father.  The  latter  succeeded  to  the  titles  of  Shams-ul-Umara, 
Amir-i-Kabir;  and  in  1869,  on  the  death  of  His  Highness  the  Nizam  Afzul- 
ud-daula,  became  Co-Regent  of  Hyderabad  with  the  late  Sir  Salar  Jang,  in 
consequence  of  the  minority  of  His  Highness  the  present  Nizam.  Under 
the  Regency  the  present  Prime  Minister  held  the  important  office  of  Minister 
of  Justice,  as  it  was  considered  essential  that  at  such  a  time  that  post  should 
be  occupied  by  one  of  the  highest  nobles  of  the  State;  and  in  1875,  when 
the  late  Sir  Salar  Jang  was  absent  in  Europe,  His  Excellency,  in  conjunction 
with  another  nobleman,  acted  as  Prime  Minister  and  Regent,  and  received 
the  thanks  of  the  Government  of  India  for  the  skill  and  ability  displayed 
in  this  exalted  capacity.  On  subsequent  occasions  also  he  occasionally 
acted  for  the  late  Prime  Minister  during  the  absence  of  the  latter  from 
Hyderabad.  With  his  brother  he  acted  as  the  representative  of  his 
uncle,  the  then  Co-Regent,  on  the  occasion  of  the  reception  of  His  Royal 
Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales  at  Bombay;  and  he  also  accompanied 
His  Highness  the  Nizam  to  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  1877, 
and  received  the  Delhi  Medal.  In  1877  the  Amir-i-Kabir  died,  and 
in  1883,  on  the  death  of  Sir  Salar  Jang,  the  Nawab  became  a  member 
of  the  Council  of  Regency,  and  acted  as  administrator  of  the  State 
during  the  visit  to  Calcutta  of  His  Highness  the  Nizam  and  the  two  adminis- 
trators later  in  the  same  year.  In  1887  he  was  deputed  by  His  High- 
ness as  his  representative  in  London  on  the  auspicious  occasion  of  the  Jubilee 
of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign,  and  maintained  the  dignity  of  his 
illustrious  kinsman's  position,  as  First  Prince  of  the  Empire,  with  an  ability 
and  liberality  that  left  nothing  to  be  desired.  His  Excellency  had  the  honour 
of  being  personally  presented  to  Her  Majesty  the  Empress  at  Windsor  Castle. 
Before  his  return  to  the  Deccan  he  was  chosen  by  His  Highness  for  the 
highest  post  in  the  State,  that  of  Prime  Minister;  and  in  this  great  and 
arduous  office,  his  conspicuous  success  has  gained  the  hearty  approval  of  His 
Highness,  and  the  congratulations  of  the  whole  world.  With  the  loyal  and 
brotherly  co-operation  of  his  distinguished  kinsman,  His  Excellency  the 
Vikar-ul-Umara  (also  one  of  the  three  Premier  Nobles  of  the  State),  and  all 
the  most  able  statesmen  of  Hyderabad,  he  has  raised  the  government  of 
His  Highness  the  Nizam's  territories  to  the  highest  state  of  efficiency  and 
enlightenment.  On  the  auspicious  occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee 
of  the  reign  of  Her  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress  in  1887,  he  was  created  a 
Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire ;  and 


32  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

the  speech  of  the  British  Resident,  when  investing  him  with  the  insignia  on 
that  occasion,  bore  ample  testimony  to  the  appreciation  of  the  Imperial 
Government.  Similar  sentiments  were  expressed  by  the  late  Viceroy  of 
India,  Lord  Dufferin,  on  the  occasion  of  Sir  Asman  Jah's  visit  to  Calcutta 
in  1888. 

Sir  Asman  Jah,  like  his  noble  kinsman,  the  Vikar-ul-Umara,  is  famous 
for  his  unbounded  hospitality,  for  his  proficiency  as  a  sportsman,  and  in  other 
accomplishments  of  social  life ;  and  both  these  noblemen,  like  their  kinsman 
Sir  Khurshid  Jah,  K.C.I.E.,  have  shared  the  fortune  of  their  ancestor  the 
Nawab  Tej  Jang,  Shams-ul-Umara,  Amir-i-Kabir,  in  allying  themselves  by 
marriage  with  Princesses  of  the  Royal  House  of  Hyderabad. 

Residences. — Bashir  Bagh,  Hyderabad  ;  Sarurnagar,  Hyderabad  ;  Joha"nnuma, 
Hyderabad. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  33 

ASMAN  JAH  BAHADUR,  MIRZA,  Prince. 
The  title  is  the  courtesy  title  of  the  second  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

ASOTHAR,  Rdjd  of.     See  Lachhman  Parshad  Singh. 


ATA  HUSAIN,  SAYYID,  Nawdb. 

Born  1860.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February 
1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty.  Married  the  daughter  of  His  late  Highness  the  Nawab  Muntazim- 
ul-Mulk,  Mohsin-ud-daula"  Faridun  Jah  Sayyid  Mansur  Ali  Khan  Bahadur 
Nasrat  Jang  Nazim  of  Murshidabad  ;  and  has  issue  Mahi-ud-din  Husain,  born 
1885  ;  and  Main-ud-din  Husain,  born  1887.  Is  descended  from  Sayyid  Khan 
Dastur,  a  Persian  follower  of  the  Emperor  Humayun,  distinguished  for  his 
bravery,  who  became  Zaminddr  of  Surjyapur,  Purniah,  in  the  Subah  of  Bengal. 
Succeeded  by  his  son-in-law  Sayyid  Rai  Khan,  who  obtained  &farmdn  from  the 
great  Akbar  Shah,  Emperor  of  Delhi ;  and  Sayyid  Rai  Khan's  son,  Raja  Sayyid 
Raja,  obtained  the  title  of  Raja  from  Shah  Shuja,  Nazim  of  Bengal,  in  the  year 
of  the  Hijrah  1052.  After  several  generations  one  of  his  descendants,  Raja 
Sayyid  Muhammad  Jalal  of  Surjyapur,  was  defeated  by  the  Nawab  Saulat  Jang 
at  his  fort  of  Jalalgarh,  as  recorded  in  the  Siyar-ul-Mutakharin.  His  grandson, 
Raja  Sayyid  Faqr-ud-din  Husain,  was  a  distinguished  Zaminddr  ;  he  took  the 
decennial  settlement  from  the  British  Government.  Succeeded  by  his  son, 
Raja  Sayyid  Dedar  Husain ;  and  the  latter  by  his  son,  Raja  Sayyid  Inayat 
Husain  (father  of  the  present  Nawab),  who  rendered  good  service  to  Govern- 
ment both  during  the  Mutinies  and  in  the  Bhutan  war  of  1864.  The 
Nawab  Sayyid  Ata  Husain  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  of  the  Krishnaganj 
subdivision,  a  Member  of  the  Central  Committee  of  the  Imperial  Institute 
in  India,  and  a  Life-Member  of  Lady  Dufferin's  Fund. 

Residence. — Khagra,  Pargana"  Surjyapur,  Purniah,  Bengal. 


ATA  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  KHAGWANI,  Nawdb. 

Is  a  descendant  of  the  Khagwani  (Afghan)  family,  and  was  created  a 
Nawab  in  1875.  His  father,  a  distinguished  soldier  named  Gholam  Sarwar 
Khan,  accompanied  Major  Lumsden  to  Kandahar,  and  on  his  death  the 
Nawab  Ata  Muhammad  Khan  succeeded  to  the  command  of  his  troop.  Was 
selected  by  General  Nicholson,  who  summoned  him  from  Bannu  in  1857,  to 
join  his  movable  column ;  greatly  distinguished  himself  in  the  subsequent 
campaigns,  and  on  one  occasion  bravely  saved  the  life  of  a  British  officer, 
Lieutenant  Humphrey.  The  Nawab  was  selected  to  succeed  Nawab  Gholam 
Hasan  Khan  as  the  British  representative  at  the  Court  of  the  Amir  of 
Kabul.  He  has  five  sons — Ahmad  Khan,  Muhammad  Khan,  Muhammad 
Nawaz  Khan,  Mahmud  Khan,  and  Hamid  Khan. 

Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Khdn,  Punjab. 

D 


34  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ATA  MUHAMMAD,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889  for  distin- 
guished service  in  the  Medical  Department. 

Residence. — Hodeida. 

ATAR  SINGH  (of  Bhadaur),  Sarddr  Sir,  K.  C.I.E. 

Son  of  Sardar  Khark  Singh;  born  1833;  *s  Chief  of  Bhadaur,  a  branch 
of  the  Phul  family,  from  which  descend  the  Chiefs  of  Patiala,  Jind,  and 
Nabha ;  educated  in  Sanskrit  at  Benares ;  rendered  good  service  to  British 
Government  during  Mutiny,  1857  (thanked  by  Government  and  exempted 
from  payment  of  six  months'  commutation-tax) ;  elected  a  Member  of  Asiatic 
Society  of  Bengal  1869,  of  Senate  of  Punjab  University  (then  University 
College)  1870,  of  Anjuman-i-Punjab  1870,  and  Vice-President  thereof  1880, 
and  in  that  year  Patron  of  the  Sat-Sabha  Punjab,  and  Member  of  the  Sri- 
Guru-Singh  Sabha,  Lahore,  and  of  the  Bengal  Philharmonical  Society;  in 
1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi,  received  the 
title  of  "Malaz-ul-Ulama-ul-Fazila";  removed  his  Library  of  English, 
Arabic,  Persian,  Sanskrit,  and  Gurmukhi  books  from  Bhadaur  to  Ludhiana, 
where  it  was  publicly  opened  on  24th  May  1878;  in  1873  translated  the 
Sakhee  Book,  or  doctrines  of  the  Sikh  religion,  from  Gurmukhi  into  English, 
in  1876  the  Travels  of  Guru  Tej  Bahadur  and  Guru  Gobind  Singh,  and  in 
1875-76,  for  the  Government,  several  chapters  of  the  Granth  (Sikh  Scriptures) 
into  Urdu  (thanked  by  Government  and  Secretary  of  State) ;  appointed 
Member  of  General  Committee  of  Darbar  Sahib  (Golden  Temple),  Amritsar, 
1883,  and  Vice-President  and  Trustee,  Khalsa  College  Establishment 
Committee,  1890;  founded  Sri-Guru-Singh  Sabha  at  Ludhiana  and  made 
President  thereof  1884;  granted,  1887,  the  title  of  Mahamahopadhyaya 
(entitling  him  to  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas) ;  President 
of  the  Khalsa  Divan ;  Life-Member  of  the  Punjab  Branch  of  the  Countess 
of  Dufferin's  Fund;  created  C.I.E.  1880,  K.C.I.E.  1888;  appointed 
Member  of  the  Committee  of  Management  of  the  Aitchison  Chiefs'  College, 
Lahore. 

Residence. — Bhadaur  House,  Ludhiana,  Punjab,  India. 


ATHGARH,  RAJA  SRI  KARAN  BHAGIRATHI  BIWARTA 
PATNAIK,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Euling  Chief. 

The  Raja,  who  is  a  Hindu  of  Kayasth  descent,  was  born  about  the  year 
1844,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  8th  February  1869.  Descended 
from  the  Raja  Niladri  Deo  Barman,  who  founded  this  State  in  very  early 
times  by  conquest ;  and  twenty-seven  generations  have  intervened  between 
him  and  the  present  Raja.  The  State  is  one  of  the  Orissa  Tributary  Mahals, 
Bengal ;  its  area  is  about  168  square  miles,  and  its  population  (chiefly  Hindus) 
is  about  31,000.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  341  men. 

Residence. — Athgarh,  Orissa,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  35 


ATHMALIK,  MAHARAJA  MAHBNDRA  DEO  SAWANT, 

Mahdrdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Maharaja,  who  is  a  Hindu  of  Kshatriya  descent,  was  born  about 
the  year  1848,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  4th  February  1877.  This 
State  is  said  to  have  been  founded  by  one  Pratap  Deo,  who,  with  seven  other 
brothers  of  the  Raja  of  Jaipur,  came  with  their  families  on  a  pilgrimage  to 
Puri.  For  some  reason  or  other  they  had  a  quarrel  with  the  Raja  of  Puri,  by 
whom  two  of  the  brothers  were  put  to  death.  The  remaining  five  brothers 
fled  for  their  lives  to  the  hills,  and  settled  at  Bonai,  of  which  they  took 
possession,  and  of  which  one  of  the  brothers  was  made  Raja.  The  sister  of 
this  Raja  of  Bonai  married  Balbhadra  Bhanj,  a  brother  of  the  Keunjhar  Raja, 
who,  having  plotted  to  dethrone  his  brother,  was  put  to  death  by  him. 
Balbhadra's  wife  fled  to  Bonai,  and  although  the  Raja  of  Keunjhar  sent 
ambassadors  there  to  bring  her  back,  Pratap  Deo  refused  to  allow  her  to 
return,  and  went  with  her  to  Ramganj  in  Bod,  where  she  gave  birth  to  a  son. 
At  that  time  a  Brahman  named  Gobardhan  Deo  was  Raja  of  Bod,  and  as 
his  only  son  was  dead,  he  adopted  Pratap  Dec's  nephew  as  his  son  and  heir. 
At  this  time  a  Raja  who  was  a  Dom  by  caste  was  ruling  on  the  north  of  the 
Mahanadi.  Pratap  Deo  defeated  him,  and  becoming  ruler  of  his  dominions, 
founded  a  village  and  named  it  Pratap-pur  after  himself.  The  elevated 
plain  across  the  Handpagarh  is,  to  the  present  day,  renowned  as  the 
garh  of  the  Dom  Raja ;  and  a  village  called  Pratap-pur  still  exists  near  it. 
Pratap  Deo  found  a  handa  (metal  top)  in  a  tank  which  he  was  excavating 
there,  and  gave  the  place  and  the  State  the  name  of  Handpa.  In  course  of 
time  one  of  the  Chiefs  who  ruled  after  Pratap  Deo  divided  the  State  into 
eight  subdivisions,  and  placed  a  Chief  over  each,  with  a  view  of  bringing 
the  aborigines  into  subjection.  Hence  the  State  changed  its  name  from 
Handpa  to  Athmalik  ("  eight  chiefs ").  The  State  (which  is  one  of  the 
Orissa  Tributary  Mahals)  has  an  area  of  730  square  miles.  Its  population, 
21,774,  is  chiefly  Hindu;  but  there  are  more  than  5000  aboriginal  hill-men. 
The  Maharaja  has  a  military  force  of  360  men  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Athmalik,  Orissa,  Bengal. 


36  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


ATMA  SINGH  (of  Padhana),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence.  —  Lahore,  Punjab. 


ATMARAM  BABA  (of  Gursarai),  Rdjd 

Born  1831.  The  title  was  conferred  on  2nd  September  1882.  The 
Raja  is  a  Dakhani  Pandit  (Maharashtra  Brahman)  whose  family  settled  in 
Gursarai  under  the  Peshwas.  Dinkar  Rao  Ana  was  sent  from  Puna,  after 
the  death  of  Gobind  Rao  Bundela,  Subahdar  of  Jalaun,  to  manage  the 
Jalaun  district  and  other  territories  of  the  Peshwa  in  Bundelkhand.  His 
second  son  was  the  Raja  Kesho  Rao  Dinkar,  father  of  the  present  Raja  ; 
who,  with  his  four  sons,  performed  the  most  eminent  military  services  to  the 
Government  throughout  the  Mutiny  in  every  part  of  the  much-disturbed 
Jhansi  division,  and  received  in  acknowledgment  the  title  of  Raja  Bahadur 
with  a  khilat  and  valuable  grants.  His  son  succeeded  him  in  1882. 

Residence.  —  Gursarai,  Pargana"  Garotha,  Jhansi,  North-Western  Provinces. 


ATTAR  SINGH  (of  Maloha),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary;  and  the  Sardar  belongs  to  a  Khatri  family, 
descended  from  the  Sardar  Dyal  Singh,  whose  sons  were  dispossessed  of 
much  of  their  territory  by  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore. 

Residence. — Maloha,  Ambala,  Punjab. 

AULAD  ALI,  MAULAVI  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Was  an  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Police,  Bengal,  and  in  that  capacity 
rendered  valuable  services  to  the  Government.  He  has  subsequently  taken 
an  active  and  useful  part  in  the  municipal  work  of  Gya,  where  he  has  been 
an  Honorary  Magistrate  and  Member  of  the  District  Board  and  Municipal 
Committee. 

Residence. — Gya,  Bengal. 

AULAD  HUSAIN,  C.I.E.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India.  He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire,  ist  January  1882. 

Residence. — Raipur,  Central  Provinces. 

AUNDH,  SHRINIVAS  PARASHURAM,  Pant  Pratinidhi  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Pant  Pratinidhi  of  Aundh,  who  is  a  Hindu  Chief  of  Brahman 
descent,  was  born  on  the  27th  November  1833,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  37 

on  nth  June  1848.  He  was  a  Member  of  the  Bombay  Legislative  Council 
from  1866  to  1868.  He  has  four  sons — Parashuram  Rao,  Gangadhar  Rao, 
Bhawan  Rao,  and  Bhagwant  Rao.  The  State  was  formerly  a  feudatory  of 
Satara ;  and  this  was  indicated  by  the  title  Pratinidhi,  which  meant  "  the 
likeness  or  representation  of  the  Raja,"  and  was  conferred  on  the  Pratinidhi 
Parashuram  Trimbak  during  the  reign  of  the  Raja  Rajaram  Maharaj  of 
Satara.  The  title  of  Pant  was  adopted  by  Parashuram  Pratinidhi  in  1846, 
on  which  occasion  he  paid  a  nazar  of  Rs.  2 5,000  to  the  Raja  of  Satara. 
Residence. — Aundh,  Sata>a,  Bombay. 


AUNG-  GYI,  MAUNG-,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Ye-u,  Burma. 

AUTAR  SINGH  (of  Mananali),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Arabella,  Punjab. 


AVCHAR,  NAIK  YBSHWANT  BADAL,  Naik  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Naik,  who  is  a  Bhil  (of  aboriginal  descent),  was  born  about  the 
year  1877.  The  area  of  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Dang  States  in 
Khandesh,  Bombay)  is  about  8  square  miles,  with  a  scanty  population  of 
about  500  Bhils. 

Residence. — Avchar,  Khdndesh,  Bombay. 

AYODHYANATH  MISR  SAMAVEDI,  PANDIT, 

Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  personal  (entitling  the  holder  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immedi- 
ately after  Rajas),  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890,  for  eminence  in 
oriental  scholarship. 

Residence. — Muzaffarpur,  Bengal. 

AZAM  ALI,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  September  1853. 
Residence. — Murshidabad,  Bengal. 


AZAM  GAURISHANKAR  UDBSHANKAR,  C.S.I. 

See  Gaurishankar. 


38  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

AZAM  SHAH,  Rdjd. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 

Residence. — Ndgpur,  Central  Provinces. 

• 

AZIM  HUSAIN  KHAN,  Khan  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  July  1*886,  for  dis- 
tinguished military  services. 

Residence. — With  5th  Punjab  Cavalry. 

AZIM  KHAN,  KUNDI,  Khan  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Kha"n,  Punjab. 

AZIM -UD- DIN  KHAN,  General  (of  Rampur),  Khan  Bahddur. 

Born  1854.  The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1885.  Is  an 
Umarkhel  Pathan  of  the  Yusufzai  tribe  of  Afghans,  descended  from  the  old 
family  of  the  Nawabs  of  Najibabad.  His  grandfather,  Nawa"b  Najib-ud- 
daula,  held  the  title  of  Amir-ul-Umara,  and  was  Prime  Minister  at  the  Mughal 
Imperial  Court  of  Delhi.  He  succeeded  his  uncle,  Nawab  AH  Asghar,  Khan 
Bahadur,  C.S.I.,  as  General  Commanding  the  Rampur  State  troops,  and  as 
confidential  vakil  for  the  Court  to  the  British  Government.  Is  Vice-President 
of  the  Council  of  Regency,  Rampur  State. 

Residence. — Moradabad,  North- Western  Provinces. 

AZIZ-ULLA,  AKHUND  (of  Matare),  Khdn  Bahddur. 

The  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  25th 
January  1865. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

AZMAT  ALI  KHAN  (of  Karnal),  Nawdb  Bahddur. 

Born  1833.  Is  of  a  Jat  family,  claiming  descent  from  King  Naushirwan, 
who  are  styled  Mandul  Naushirwani.  Muhamdi  Khan,  great-grandfather  of 
Nawab  Atmat  Ali  Khan,  and  his  two  brothers,  were  in  the  service  of  the 
Mahrattas  at  the  head  of  200  horsemen,  and  were  rewarded  by  a  grant  of 
extensive  lands  in  Muzaffarnagar  and  elsewhere.  During  the  Mahratta  war, 
Muhamdi  Khan  aided  the  British  forces  ;  and  at  its  close  exchanged  his 
lands  in  the  Doab  for  the  Pargana  of  Karnal,  one-third  of  which  descended 
to  the  ancestor  of  Nawab  Azmat  Ali  Khan.  During  the  disturbances  of 
1857,  the  Nawab  Ahmad  Ali  Khan,  father  of  the  present  Nawab,  most 
loyally  aided  the  Government  with  all  his  retainers ;  and  his  services  were 
suitably  recognised  on  the  restoration  of  order.  The  present  Nawab  formally 
received  that  title  in  1868;  and  the  further  addition  of  Bahadur  on  ist 
January  1891. 

Residences. — Karndl,  Punjab  ;  and  Jaroda,  Muzaffarnagar,  North  -  Western 
Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  39 


BA  TU,  MAUNG,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Mm. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chaift  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Henzada,  Burma. 


BA  U,  MAUNG,  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Sal  win,  Burma. 

BA  WA,  MAUNG,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  y a  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2Qth  May  1886.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Rangoon,  Burma. 

BABA  KHBM  SINGH,  C.I.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1879. 

BACHAL  walad  GHULAM  NAJAF  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

BACHITTAR  SINGH  (of  Shahabad),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Ambala,  Punjab. 

BADAN  SINGH  (of  Malaudh),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardars  of  Malaudh  (like  those  of  Bhadaur) 
being  descendants  of  Phul,  and  therefore  of  the  same  stock  with  the  Phulkian 
Chiefs  of  Patiala,  Jind,  and  Nabha.  The  family  is  Jat  Sidhu,  and  conquered 
the  district  of  Malaudh  from  the  Afghans  of  Maler  Kotla  in  1754.  Sardar 
Badan  Singh's  father  was  Sardar  Mit  Singh,  who,  with  his  brother  Fateh 
Singh,  did  good  service  during  the  war  of  1845-46,  supplying  fifty  horse- 
men, and  himself  fighting  in  person  at  the  battles  of  Mudki  and  Firuzshahr. 
In  1857  he  showed  conspicuous  loyalty,  being  always  ready  with  men  and 
money  to  assist  the  Government ;  he  received  as  a  reward  the  remission  of 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


a  year's  commutation  money,  while  one-sixteenth  of  the  whole  sum  was 
excused  in  perpetuity.     In  1872,  when  Malaudh  was  attacked  by  the  Kukas, 
Sardar  Badan  Singh  was  badly  wounded  by  the  rebels. 
Residence. — Malaudh,  Ludhia"na,  Punjab. 

BADAR-I-MUNIB,  Shdhzdda. 

The   title   is   personal,   and  was   recognised  4th   February    1853,    the 
Shahzada  being  a  descendant  of  the  royal  family  of  Kabul. 
Residence. — Ludhidna,  Punjab. 

BADI-UD-DIN,  KHWAJA,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  February  1882. 
Residence. — Bulddna,  Bardr. 

BADBI  DAS,  MUKIM,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1833.    The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion 
of  the  celebration  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

BADRI  DAT  TOSHI,  PANDIT,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  4th  October  1830.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
1 6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her 
Most  Gracious  Majesty.  The  Rai  Bahadur's  ancestor  held  the  office  of 
Minister  of  Kumaon  in  the  time  of  the  Chand  and  Gurkha  Raj. 

Residence. — Kumaon,  North-Western  Provinces. 

BAG-HAL,  EAJA  DHYAN  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1841 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  26th  July  1878.  Belongs  to 
a  Puar  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Ujjab  De,  who  came  from 
Ujjain,  and  conquered  Baghal  at  an  unknown  date.  The  State  was  overrun 
by  the  Gurkhas  from  Nepal  between  1803  and  1815  ;  but  after  their  expul- 
sion in  the  latter  year,  the  Puar  chief  (about  twenty-fifth  in  descent  from 
Ujjab  De)  was  recognised  by  Government.  Kishan  Singh,  who  had  been 
raised  to  the  rank  of  Raja  in  1875,  died  on  23rd  July  1877,  and  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  infant  son,  Raja  Moti  Singh;  but  the  latter  also  died  on  i2th 
October  1877,  when  the  present  Raja,  a  collateral  descendant  of  Ujjab  De, 
succeeded.  The  area  of  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States) 
is  about  124  square  miles;  its  population  20,633,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  150  infantry  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Baghal,  Punjab. 

BAGHAL  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883. 
Residence. — Sialkot,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  41 

BAGHAT,  RANA  DALIP  SINGH,  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1860;  succeeded  to^ the  gadi  on  the  3ist  January  1862.  Belongs 
to  a  Rajput  family,  the  ancestor  of  whom  came  from  Dorar  Nagri  in  the 
Deccan,  and  acquired  possession  of  the  State  by  conquest.  During  the 
Gurkha  wars  (1803-15)  the  conduct  of  the  then  chief,  Rana  Mohindar 
Singh,  had  been  unfriendly;  so  on  the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas,  three- 
fourths  of  the  Baghat  State  was  sold  to  Patiala  for  Rs.  1,30,000  and  the 
remaining  fourth  was  granted  to  Rana  Mohindar  Singh  and  his  heirs.  He 
died  without  issue  on  nth  July  1839,  and  the  State  was  at  first  treated  as 
lapsed;  but  in  1842  Lord  Ellenborough  restored  it  to  Rana  Bije  Singh, 
brother  of  Mohindar  Singh.  He  died  in  January  1849,  leaving  no  direct  heir, 
and  the  State  was  at  first  again  treated  as  lapsed;  but  in  1861  Lord  Canning 
restored  it,  for  good  and  loyal  conduct,  to  Umaid  Singh,  a  cousin  of  the  late 
Rana.  But  before  the  sanad  conferring  the  grant  could  be  prepared,  Umaid 
Singh  died,  and  his  last  request  was  that  his  son  Dalip  Singh  might  succeed 
him.  In  January  1862  a  sanad  was  granted  to  Rana  Dalip  Singh.  The 
area  of  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  is  about  60  square 
miles;  its  population  8339,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a  military 
force  of  25  soldiers. 

Residence. — Baghat,  Punjab. 

BAGLI,  THAKUR  RAGHUNATH  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  is  descended  from  a  Rahtor  Rajput  family  (Hindu).  He 
was  born  1860  ;  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  January  1869.  The  State  is 
enclosed  within  that  of  Gwalior,  so  that  its  exact  area  is  not  known.  Its 
population  is  14,645,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — >Bagli,  Indore,  Central  India. 

BAHADUR  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  is  the  son  of  the  Nawab  Amir  AH  Khan,  who  was 
the  grandson  of  His  late  Majesty  Shuja-ud-daula,  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

BAHADUR  SINGH,  THAKUR,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 
Residence. — Masuda,  Ajmir. 

BAHAR  MAL,  Rao. 

The  title  was  conferred  on   ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 
Residence. — Merwara. 


42  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BAHAWALPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RUKN-UD-DAULA  NASRAT 
JANG  HAFIZ-UL-MULK  MUKHLIS-UD-DAULA  NAWAB 
SIR  SADIK  MUHAMMAD  KHAN  BAHADUR,  G.C.S.I., 
Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  in  1862  ;  succeeded  to  ft\t  gadi  in  1866.  Belongs  to  a  Daudputra 
(Muhammadan)  family,  whose  ancestor  came  from  Sind  about  the  middle 
of  the  1 8th  century.  Muhammad  Sadik  Khan  was  Governor  of  Bahawalpur 
under  the  Sikh  Government ;  and  the  chiefs  of  his  clan  retained  virtual 
independence  till  his  second  son,  the  Nawab  Bahawal  Khan  I.,  reduced  the 
whole  tribe,  and  consolidated  his  power.  By  the  treaties  of  Lahore  between 
the  British  Government  and  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh,  the  latter  was  con- 
fined to  the  right  bank  of  the  Satlej ;  and  thereby  Bahawalpur  was  protected 
from  the  Sikhs.  The  Nawab  rendered  faithful  assistance  to  the  Government 
in  the  first  Afghan  war;  and  during  the  siege  of  Multan  the  troops  of 
Bahawal  Khan  III.  co-operated  with  Sir  Herbert  Edwardes.  Bahawal  Khan 
III.  was  succeeded  by  his  younger  son,  Saadat  Yar  Khan ;  but  the  latter  was 
subsequently  deposed  by  his  elder  brother,  Haji  Khan,  who  after  his  victory 
assumed  the  name  of  Fateh  Muhammad  Khan.  He  died  in  1858,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  who  assumed  the  name  of  Bahawal  Khan  IV.  He 
had  to  face  some  serious  rebellions,  and  died  suddenly  in  1866,  leaving  his 
son,  the  present  Nawab,  a  boy  of  only  four  years  old,  in  a  difficult  and 
dangerous  position.  It  was  resolved,  however,  by  the  Paramount  Power,  that 
the  young  Nawab  should  be  supported ;  and  during  his  minority  the  adminis- 
tration was  placed  in  British  hands,  native  officers  being  appointed,  so  that 
there  might  be  no  break  in  continuity  of  system  on  the  Nawab's  coming  of 
age.  Since  then  vast  improvements  have  been  made  in  the  irrigation  system 
of  the  country,  which  depends  upon  inundation  canals  for  the  greater  part  of 
its  cultivation.  Existing  works  have  been  entirely  remodelled,  and  new 
canals  constructed  in  several  parts  of  the  territory,  the  result  of  which  is  that 
the  revenues  have  nearly  doubled.  Courts  of  Justice  have  been  established, 
under  the  general  control  of  a  Chief  Court,  presided  over  by  three  native 
gentlemen,  and  are  highly  popular.  A  system  of  Public  Instruction,  com- 
prising primary,  middle,  and  superior  education,  has  been  set  on  foot ;  a 
central  jail  has  been  built,  and  the  prison  system  greatly  improved.  Three 
new  towns  have  been  founded.  A  stud  farm  for  improving  the  breed  of 
horses  has  been  started,  and  the  extensive  jungles  have  been  placed  under 
the  scientific  supervision  of  a  trained  Forest  Conservator.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  17,285  square  miles;  its  population  is  573,494,  chiefly  Muhamma- 
dans,  with  91,272  Hindus.  His  Highness  the  Nawab  Bahadur  maintains  a 
military  force  of  443  cavalry,  1352  infantry,  and  n  guns,  and  is  entitled  to 
a  salute  of  1 7  guns.  He  was  created  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  i6th  November  1880. 

Residences. — The  Palace,  Bahawalpur,  Punjab  ;  Bahawalpur  House,  Lahore. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


43 


BAI  (INDORB),  THAKUR  MANRUP  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  and  succeeded 
to  the^zft/z  in  1880. 

Residence.  —  Bai,  Indore,  Central  India. 


BAIDYANATH  PANDIT,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence.  —  Cuttack,  Bengal. 

BAIKANTHA  NATH  DB,  Kumar,  Rdjd  Bahadur. 
The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence.  —  Balasor,  Bengal. 

BAIKANTHPUR,  RAIKAT  PANINDRA  DBB,  Raikat  of. 

This  is  one  of  those  customary  titles  (of  which  there  are  many,  especially 
in  Bengal)  which  have  never  been  officially  recognised  by  Government,  and 
which  consequently  must,  for  the  present,  be  regarded  as  only  courtesy  titles. 
The  family  is  said  to  be  descended  from  a  brother  of  the  founder  of  the 
Kuch  Behar  Raj  ;  and  the  title  "  Raikat,"  which  is  of  high  antiquity,  has 
been  held  to  indicate  that  the  early  Raikats  of  Baikanthpur  were  Prime 
Ministers  and  Commanders-in-Chief  of  the  Kamrup  kingdom,  of  which  Kuch 
Behar  was  an  important  part.  The  present  Raikat  is  stated  to  be  the 
twentieth  in  succession  who  has  inherited  the  title;  and  during  the  last 
Bhutan  war  the  family  rendered  good  service  to  Government. 

Residence.  —  Baikanthpur,  Jalpaiguri,  Bengal. 


BAIKUNTA  NARAYAN  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  never  to  have  been  formally  recog- 
nised by  Government.  The  Raja  is  the  Zaminddr  of  Tundi  in  Manbhum. 
The  family  claims  to  be  of  Surya  Vansa  Rajput  descent,  and  to  have  come  from 
Ajudhya.  They  have  the  following  system  of  titles  for  the  various  members 
of  the  family  of  the  Zaminddr  or  proprietor  of  the  Rdj.  For  the  head  of 
the  family,  Rdjd  ;  for  his  wife,  Rani. 


ist  son 

2nd  son 

3rd  son 

4th  son 

5th  and  younger  sons  . 


Tikait. 

ist  son's  ist  son 

Kumdr. 

„      „     2nd  son 

Thdkur. 

„      „     3rd  son 

Nunu. 

Babu. 

Thdkur. 
Kumdr. 
Nunu. 


For  a  similar   system  prevailing   in   the    Nawagarh    family,    see    under 
Banwari  Lai  Singh,  Raja. 

Residence. — Tundi,  Mdnbhum,  Bengal. 


44  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BAISNI  (of  Khimsipur),  Thakurani. 
The  title  of  Rao  is  hereditary  in  this  lady's  family. 
Residence. — Farrukhabad,  North- Western  Provinces. 

BAJANA,  MALBK  NASIB  KHANJI  DARIYA  KHANJI, 

Tdlukddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 4th  May  1820;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  April  1841. 
Descended  from  a  family  of  Jat  Musalmans ;  is  usually  styled  "  Malek  Shri." 
His  son  is  named  Jiwan  Khan.  The  area  of  the  State  is  183  square  miles ; 
its  population  15,877,  partly  Hindu,  partly  Muhammadan.  The  Malek  Shri 
maintains  a  military  force  of  60  cavalry  and  230  infantry. 

Residence. — Bajdna,  Kdthidwdr,  Bombay. 

BAKAR  ALI  KHAN,  SAYYID,  C.I.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1883. 

Residence. — 

BAKAR  MIRZA,  Mirza  Bahadur. 

The  Mirza  Bahadur  is  a  son  of  the  Nawab  Mumtaz-ud-daula,  who  was  a 
grandson  of  His  late  Majesty  Muhammad  AH  Shah,  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Oudh. 

BAKASREI,  Diwdn,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2ist  June  1872. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  SincL 

BAKHSHI  KHOMAN  SINGH  (of  Indore),  C.SJ. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of 
India,  ist  January  1877,.  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 

Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 

BAKHSHISH  SINGH,  SINDHANWALIA,  Sarddr. 

The  Sardar  succeeded  Sardar  Shamsher  Singh  (who  had  adopted  him  as 
a  scion  of  the  same  family,  with  the  consent  of  Government)  on  the  death 
of  the  latter  in  1873.  The  Sindhanwalia  family,  Jats  of  the  Sansi  tribe,  is 
the  acknowledged  head  of  all  Sikh  families  between  the  Bias  and  the  Indus ; 
and  is  descended  from  the  same  stock  as  the  late  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of 
Lahore.  The  common  ancestor,  Budh  Singh,  had  two  sons,  Chanda  Singh 
and  Jodh  Singh ;  the  latter  was  the  forefather  of  the  late  Royal  family  of 
Lahore,  while  from  the  former  descended  Sardar  Shamsher  Singh  and  the 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  4$ 

Sindhanwalia  family.  On  the  occasion  of  the  rebellion  of  Diwan  Mul  Raj, 
Sardar  Shamsher  Singh  remained  faithful  to  the  British  Government,  and  in 
December  1846  he  was  appointed  a  member  of  the  Council  of  Regency. 
On  the  final  annexation  of  the  Punjab  }\\sjdgirs  were  continued  to  him  for 
life,  and  in  1862  he  was  appointed  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and  was  per- 
mitted to  adopt  the  present  Sardar,  a  large  portion  of  his  jdgirs  to  descend 
in  perpetuity,  and  the  title  to  be  hereditary. 
Residence. — Rajd  Sansi,  Amritsar,  Punjab. 


BAKHSHISH  SINGH,  Kunwdr. 

The  title  is  personal. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 


BAKHTAWAR  SINGH,  Rat  Bahadur. 

Is  a  Court  Official  of  the  Mewar  State  (Udaipur),  Rajputana.     Received 
the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  2£th  May  1892. 
Residence. — Udaipur,  Rajputdna. 


BAKHTGARH  (Bhopdwar),  THAKUR  PARTAB  SINGH, 

Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  was  born  in  1863,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1869.  He 
is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  population  of  the  State  is 
8258,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bakhtgarh,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 


BAKHTIYAR  SHAH,  Prince. 

The  title  is  a  courtesy  one.     His  father,   Prince  Anwar  Shah,  was  a 
member  of  the  Tippu  family  of  Mysore,  and  grandson  of  Tippu  Sultan. 
Residence. — C  alcutta. 


BAL  MUKAND,  RAI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  5th  November  1834.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
1 6th  February  1887,  the  Rai  Bahadur  having  received  a  Certificate  of  Honour 
at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  1877.  His  ancestors  (who  were 
Khattris)  came  from  the  Punjab  about  300  years  ago,  and  became  mer- 
chants at  Agra.  He  did  good  service  in  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  by  saving 
some  of  the  records  of  the  Agra  Board  of  Revenue;  and  in  1866  was 
appointed  a  permanent  Deputy  Collector. 

Residence. — Agra,  North- Western  Provinces. 


46  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BAL  PARUSHURAM  PANDIT,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  March  1870. 
Residence. — Satara,  Bombay. 

BALA  PARSHAD,   PANDIT,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the 
Empress.  The  Rai  Bahadur  had  done  good  service  in  the  Rajputana-Malwa 
Railway  Police,  and  retired  on  pension  on  ist  November  1891.  He  has  no 
son ;  his  brothers  are  Pandit  Manik  Parshad  of  Indore,  born  1851;  and 
Pandit  Kalika  Parshad  of  the  Bombay  Police  (retired  in  1891),  born  1857. 

Residence. — Rajputa"na-Ma"lwd  Railway  Police. 

BALA  SHASTRI  AGASB,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the 
Empress,  in  recognition  of  eminence  in  oriental  scholarship.  It  entitles  him 
to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Ratnagiri,  Bombay. 

BALAJI  KRISHNA  BENDIG-ERI,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  29th  May  1886. 
Residence. — Belgaum,  Bombay. 

BALASINOR,  NAWAB  MUNAWAR  KHANJI,  Bdbi  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1844;  succeeded  his  father,  Nawab  Jorawar  Khanji  Babi,  in 
November  1882.  This  family  is  Pathan  (Muhammadan),  claiming  descent 
from  Sher  Khanji  Babi,  son  of  Bahadur  Khanji  Babi,  a  distinguished  officer 
in  the  Imperial  Service  of  Delhi.  The  area  of  the  State  is  189  square  miles ; 
its  population  46,328,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Nawab  Babi  maintains  a 
military  force  of  60  cavalry,  177  infantry,  and  5  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Balasinor,  Rewa"  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 

BALAVADRA  PRASAD  DAS,  Rdjkumdr  Bairiganjon  Bhuyan 

Mahdpatra. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  seem  never  to  have  been  formally  recognised 
by  the  Government.  The  family  belongs  to  the  Ganga  Varna,  the  ancient  race 
of  the  Gajapati  kings  of  Orissa,  from  whom  the  title  was  derived.  The  Raj- 
kumar  has  done  good  service  by  providing  elephants  for  Government  in  time 
of  war.  His  eldest  son,  whose  name  is  Umakanta  Das  Mahapatra,  bears  the 
title  of  Tikait  Bdbu  ;  the  younger  sons — Bisambhar  Das,  Nityananda  Das, 
Sachidananda  Das,  Achutananda  Das — are  all  styled  Bdbu. 

Residence. — Balason,  Orissa. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  47 

BALBAHADUB  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1886. 
Residence. — Raigarh,  Central  India. 

BALBIR  SINGH  (of  Kattahr),  Rdjd. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Kdngra,  Punjab. 

BALDBO  SINGH  (of  Awa),  Rdjd. 

Born  loth  July  1850.  .The  title  is  hereditary,  the  tradition  being  that 
it  was  originally  conferred  by  the  Maharana  of  Udaipur.  Belongs  to  a  family 
of  Jadon  Rajputs,  descended  from  Thakur  Chatarbhuj,  a  Zaminddr  of  Nari 
in  the  Chhata  Pargana,  who,  in  the  time  of  Muhammad  Shah  (1719-48), 
settled  at  Jalesar.  His  grandson,  Bakht  Singh,  gave  military  service  to  the 
Maharaja  of  Bharatpur  and  the  Thakur  of  Amargarh,  and  gradually  estab- 
lished himself  as  an  independent  Chief.  Finally  he  obtained  a  sanad  from 
the  Mahrattas,  authorising  him  to  build  a  fort  at  Awa  ;  and  his  successor, 
Hira  Singh,  built  the  existing  fort.  In  the  Mahratta  war  Hira  Singh  was 
able  to  render  some  service  to  the  British  Power;  and  consequently  in  1803 
obtained  from  General  Lake  a  sanad  confirming  him  in  possession.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  Pitambar  Singh,  who  is  said  to  have  been  recognised 
as  a  Raja  by  Lord  Auckland  in  1838.  Pitambar  Singh  adopted  from  the 
descendants  of  the  younger  brother  of  Bakht  Singh,  Raja  Prithvi  Singh. 
The  latter  did  excellent  service  during  the  Mutiny ;  he  raised  horse  and  foot, 
attacked  the  insurgent  villages,  restored  the  whole  of  the  neighbourhood  to 
order,  collected  the  revenue,  and  remitted  it  to  Agra.  "  In  fact,"  to  quote 
the  Report  of  the  District  Officer,  "  he  held  the  country  till  the  taking  of 
Delhi,  and  the  arrival  of  our  own  troops  enabled  us  to  resume  possession." 
He  died  in  1876,  leaving  one  son,  Raja  Chatarpal  Singh,  a  minor.  The 
latter  died  in  1884,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  cousin,  the  present  Raja. 

Residence. — Awa,  Etah,  North- Western  Provinces. 

BALIKRAM,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  April  1881. 
Residence. — Bulddna,  Berar. 

BALKISHAN  AMAR  SINGH,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  25th  June  1884. 
Residence. — N£sik,  Bombay. 

BALLABH  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  $rd  February  1883. 
Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BALSAN,  RANA  BIR  SINGH,  Rdnd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1860;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i7th  November  1884.  Belongs  to 
a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  his  ancestor,  Alak  Singh,  the  founder  of  the  family, 
having  been  a  scion  of  the  ruling  House  of  Sirmur.  The  Chiefs  of  Balsan 
were  feudatories  of  Sirmur  till  1815,  when  SLsanadvras  granted  by  the  British 
Government.  Bhup  Singh,  the  grandfather  and  predecessor  of  the  present 
Chief,  did  good  service  in  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  was  rewarded  with  the 
title  of  Rana.  His  son,  the  Kunwar  Govardhan  Singh,  predeceased  him  ;  so 
he  was  succeeded  by  his  grandson,  the  present  Rana,  The  area  of  the  State 
(which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  is  51  miles;  its  population  is  5190, 
chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a  military  force  of  50  infantry. 

Residence. — Balsan,  Punjab. 

BALUCH  KHAN,  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Baluchistan. 

BALWANT  RAO  (of  Karwi),  Rao. 

Born  1828.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  a  Mahratta  Brahman,  the  grand- 
son by  adoption  of  Venaik  Rao,  who  was  the  son  of  Amrit  Rao,  brother  of 
the  last  Peshwa,  Baji  Rao.  His  two  uncles  joined  in  the  rebellion  of  1857, 
and  their  estates  were  confiscated,  and  themselves  deported.  But  Balwant 
Rao  proved  his  loyalty,  and  is  now  the  head  of  the  family  at  Karwi.  He 
has  adopted  a  son,  Moreshwar  Rao,  born  i7th  August  1872. 

Residence. — Karwi,  North- Western  Provinces. 

BALWANT  RAO  BHUSKUTB,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Nimar,  Central  Provinces. 

BALWANT  RAO  GOPAL  JAVDEKAR,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3ist  January  1883. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

BALWANT  SINGH  (of  Bir  Chima),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sarddr  being  the  head  of  the  younger  branch 
of  the  Phulkian  family  of  Malaudh  (see  Badan  Singh,  Sarddr),  descended  from 
Phul,  the  common  ancestor  of  the  Houses  of  Patidla,  Jind,  Nabha,  and 
Bhadaur.  He  is  the  son  of  the  late  Sarddr  Hakikat  Singh  of  Bir.  On  the 
death  of  his  brother,  Ranjit  Singh,  he  succeeded  to  the  Bir  estate,  having 
before  held  that  of  Chima  only.  He  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and  did 
excellent  service  in  the  troubled  times  of  1857. 

Residence. — Ludhiana,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  49 


BALWANT  SINGH  (of  Botala),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  a  descendant  of  Dhanna  Singh, 
who  was  an  associate  of  Sardar  Jodh  Singh,  great-grandfather  of  Maharaja 
Ranjit  Singh. 

Residence. — Gujra"nwa"la,  Punjab. 


BALWANT  SINGH  (of  Rangarh  Nangal),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  descended  from  a  Rajput  family 
whose  ancestor  came  originally  from  Bikanir,  and  founded  Rangarh  Nangal 
in  the  Gurdaspur  district,  Punjab.  Sardar  Karam  Singh  was  the  head  of  the 
family  in  the  time  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh ;  and  when  the  latter  seized 
Lahore  and  Amritsar,  Karam  Singh  gave  in  his  allegiance.  His  grandson, 
Sardar  Argan  Singh,  served  in  the  battle  of  Sobraon.  During  the  rebellion 
of  1848  he  joined  the  rebels,  and  his  estates  were  confiscated.  A  consider- 
able pension  was  subsequently  granted  to  him.  The  late  Raja  of  Nabha  was 
a  second  cousin  of  Sardar  Balwant  Singh,  as  Sardar  Argan  Singh's  sister 
married  Raja  Devindra  Singh,  Chief  of  Nabha. 

Residence. — Gurddspur,  Punjab. 


BALWANT  SINGH  (of  Barehta),  Thdkur. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  ancestors  of  the  Thakur  having 
been  in  the  Narsinghpur  district  from  time  immemorial,  and  long  known  for 
their  loyalty ;  it  was  originally  conferred  by  one  of  the  ancient  Gond  Rajas 
of  Mandla.  Belongs  to  a  Raj  Gond  family;  his  son  is  named  Barilol 
Singh. 

Residence. — Barehta,  Narsinghpur,  Central  Provinces. 


BALWANT  SINGH  (of  Piprasur),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Raja  being  the  son  of  the  Raja  Anrudh  Singh, 
and  descended  from  Debi  Singh,  Raja  of  Orchha. 

Residence. — Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

BAMANBOB,  The  Chief  of . 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  area  of  the  State  is  12  square  miles,  with  a  population  of  987. 
Residence. — Bamanbor,  Ka"thia"wa"r,  Bombay. 


BAMBO  KHAN,  Jam.     See  Bhambo  Khan,  Jam. 
E  ' 


50  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BAMRA,  RAJA  SUDHAL  DEO,  C.I.E.,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1849;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  i2th  May  1869.  Is 
descended  from  a  Gangabansi  Rajput  family,  from  the  same  stock  as  that  of 
the  Gajpati  Rajas  of  Puri  in  Orissa,  which  acquired  the  Bamra  territory  by 
conquest  in  early  times.  He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent 
Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  ist  January  1889.  The  Raja's  son,  Sachidan- 
and,  bears  the  courtesy  title  of  Tikait  Babu.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1988 
square  miles;  and  its  population  is  81,286,  many  Hindus,  but  with  over 
50,000  belonging  to  Abor  (aboriginal)  tribes. 

Residence. — Bamra,  Central  Provinces. 

BANGANAPALE,  NAWAB  SAYYID  FATH  ALI  KHAN 

BAHADUR,  C.S.I.,  Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  loth  July  1848;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1868.  Is  a  Shiah 
Muhammadan,  and  a  Sayyid  (or  descendant  of  the  Prophet).  He  was 
created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  ist 
January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  The  family  held  an  ancient  title,  Jagirdar  of 
Banganapale;  the  title  of  Nawab  was  conferred  in  1876.  His  son  is  named 
Sayyid  Gulam  AH  Khan.  The  area  of  the  State  is  166  square  miles;  its 
population  30,754,  chiefly  Hindus,  the  Muhammadans  being  5952.  The 
Chief  has  a  salute  of  6  guns. 

Residence. — Banganapale,  Madras. 

BANSDA,  MAHARAWAL  SHRI  PRATAPSINGHJI 
GULABSINGHJI,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  6th  December  1863;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  6th  March 
1876.  The  family  is  Solanki  Rajput  (Hindu),  and  is  styled  "Vansdia";  it 
is  descended  from  a  chieftain  of  ancient  times  named  Muldeoji.  The  area  of 
the  State  is  215  square  miles  ;  its  population  is  34,908,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Maharawal  maintains  a  military  force  of  24  cavalry,  in  infantry,  and  i 
gun,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Bansda,  Surat,  Bombay. 

BANSPAT  SINGH  (of  Barah),  Rdjd. 

Born  1834.  The  title  was  conferred  as  a  personal  distinction  on  3©th 
November  1858,  for  eminent  services  rendered  during  the  Mutiny,  the  Raja 
having  loyally  supported  the  police,  escorted  the  revenue-collections  during 
the  disturbances,  and  proceeded  in  December  1857  with  1000  followers  to 
rid  Pargana  Khairagarh  of  a  formidable  band  of  rebels  who  had  gathered 
there.  Is  descended  from  the  same  ancestry  as  His  Highness  the  Maharaja 
of  Rewah,  and  belongs  to  a  Baghel  Rajput  family. 

Residence. — Barah,  Allahabad,  North-Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  51 


BANSWARA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAI-I-RAYAN  MAHARAWAL 
SRI  LACHMAN  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Mahdrdwal  of. 

Born  3oth  January  1838;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1842.  Is  a 
descendant  (through  the  Maharawal  Udai  Singh  of  Dungarpur,  q.v.}  of  the 
Maharanas  of  Udaipur  ("  Children  of  the  Sun  "),  and  consequently  a  Sisodiya 
Rajput.  Udai  Singh,  Maharawal  of  Dungarpur,  gave  the  territory  of 
Banswara  to  his  younger  son  Jagmal  Singh,  with  the  title  of  Maharawal. 
The  area  of  the  State  (including  that  of  its  feudatory  Kusalgarh)  is  about 
1500  square  miles  ;  its  population  175,145,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  about 
50,000  Bhils  (aboriginal).  The  Maharawal  maintains  a  military  force  of 
640  cavalry,  783  infantry,  and  14  guns.  His  Highness  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  1 5  guns.  His  son  is  the  Maharaj-Kunwar  Sambhu  Singh  Bahadur. 
Residence. — Bdnswdra,  Rajputa"na. 


BANTWA  (GIDAR),  SAMAT  KHAN  BABI,  Khdn  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1854;  descended  from  a  Pathan  (Muhammadan)  family. 
Residence. — Gidar,  Kdthidwdr,  Bombay. 

BANTWA  (MANAWADAR),  KHAN  SHRI  FATHEH-UD-DIN 

KHANJI,  Khdn  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1835  >  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  March  1888.  There  are  now 
four  divisions  of  the  Bantwa  State ;  the  united  area  is  221  square  miles,  the 
united  population  38,517,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Chief  of  Bantwa  has  the 
title  of  Khan  Shri ;  his  family  name  is  Babi. 

Residence. — Manawadar,  Kdthidwdr,  Bombay. 


BANWARI  ANANDA  DEB,  Mahdrdj  Kumar. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  the  Maharaj  Kumar  as  the 
adopted  son  of  the  late  Maharaja  Jagatindra  Banwari  Govinda  Bahadur  of 
Banwaribad,  who  rendered  good  service  during  the  famine  of  1866-67.  The 
Maharaja  Jagatindra's  father,  Nityananda,  received  from  the  old  Mughal 
Government  the  title  of  "  Azimat-ullah  Amir-ul-Mulk  Jagatindra  Danishnanda 
Sipahdar  Jang  Bahadur." 

Residence. — Murshidabad,  Bengal. 


BANWARI  LAL  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  never  to  have  been  formally 
recognised  by  Government.  The  family  claims  that  its  ancestor  came  from 
Baghelkhand,  and  set  up  the  Raj  of  Palganj  in  Hazaribagh;  and  that  a 
branch  of  this  family  obtained  the  Zaminddri  of  Nawagarh  in  Manbhum, 


52  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

part  of  which  is  held  by  the  present  Raja,  part  by  Thakur  Giridhari  Singh, 
and  part  by  the  Thakurani,  widow  of  Thakur  Bhola  Prasad  Singh.  In  Raja 
Banwari  Lai  Singh's  branch  of  the  family  the  following  titles  are  held : — by 
the  head,  Rdjd ;  by  his  wife,  Rani;  by  the  eldest  son,  Tikait ;  by  the 
second  son,  Kumar ;  by  the  third  son,  Thakur ;  by  the  fourth  son,  Nunu ; 
by  the  fifth  and  younger  sons,  Bdbu. 

Residence. — Nawa*garh,  Manbhum,  Bengal. 


BANYIN,  KUN  SAW,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  one  of  the  Shan  Chiefs,  and  rules  over  a  State  of  about 
230  square  miles. 

Residence. — Banyin,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

BAONI,  His  Highness  the  Nawdb  Bahadur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Nawab  was  born  in  1863  ;  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  5th 
October  1883.  He  is  descended  from  a  Pathan  (Muhammadan)  family  of 
Bundelkhand ;  and  his  full  titles  are  — "  His  Highness  Azam-ul-Umara, 
Fakhr-ud-daula,  Main-ul-Mulk,  Saheb-i-Jah,  Mihin  Sardar,  Nawab  Muhammad 
Hasan  Khan  Bahadur,  Zafar  Jang."  His  ancestor,  the  Nawab  Ghazi-ud-din 
Khan,  at  one  time  Minister  at  the  Imperial  Court  of  the  Mughals,  was 
grandson  of  Asaf  Jah,  Nizam  of  Hyderabad,  and  was  also  connected  with  the 
family  of  the  Nawab  Vazir  of  Oudh.  He  obtained  a  grant  of  fifty-two  villages 
from  the  Peshwa  in  Bundelkhand.  His  son,  the  Nawab  Vazir-ud-daula 
Khan,  was  recognised  as  Chief  by  the  British  Government.  The  grandson 
of  the  latter  was  the  Nawab  Muhammad  Mehdi  Hasan  Khan,  the  father  of 
the  present  Nawab. 

The  family  banner  was  displayed  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in 
1877,  with  the  motto,  "The  authority  is  God's,  and  the  country  is  God's." 
The  area  of  the  State  is  about  117  square  miles;  its  population  is  17,055, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  2342  Muhammadans.  The  Nawab  Bahadur 
maintains  a  military  force  of  9  cavalry,  185  infantry,  and  2  guns.  He  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Baoni,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


BAPU  DBVA  SHASTRI,  C.I.B.,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

Born  ist  November  1821.  The  title  is  personal.  It  was  conferred  on 
1 6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of 
Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Empress,  in  consideration  of  emin- 
ence as  an  oriental  scholar ;  and  it  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar 
immediately  after  titular  Rajas.  Belongs  to  a  Mahratta  Brahman  family, 
long  settled,  in  a  good  position  as  bankers  and  men  learned  in  Hindi 
theology,  at  Tonka  on  the  Godavari  in  the  Ahmadabad  district.  Educated 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  53 

at  Nagpur ;  became  Professor  of  Mathematics  in  the  Benares  College  in 
1842.  In  1852,  received  a  reward  of  Rs.2Ooo  from  Government  for  a 
Hindi  treatise  on  algebra,  and  in  1869  a  khilat  of  Rs.  1000  and  two  shawls. 
Is  a  Fellow  of  the  Asiatic  Society  of  Bengal,  of  the  Royal  Asiatic  Society, 
and  of  the  Calcutta  and  Allahabad  Universities.  Is  the  author  of  many 
works  on  Sanskrit  literature  and  mathematics ;  and  in  1878  was  created  a 
Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 
Residence. — Benares,  North-Western  Provinces. 


BAPU  RAO  PATWARDHAN,  PANDIT,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Ndgpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BAPUBHAI  DAYASHANKAR,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i;th  July  1867. 
Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 


54  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BARAMBA,  RAJA  BISAMBHAR  BIRBAR  MANGRAJ 
MAHAP ATTAR,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1880;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i5th  July  1881,  and  is  still  a  minor. 
The  Raja  is  descended  from  a  Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family.  The  history  of 
the  Baramba  State  commences  from  the  year  1305  A.D.,  with  Hatakeshwar 
Raut,  a  famous  wrestler,  who  served  Kishori  Narsingh,  the  ruler  of  Orissa, 
and  in  recognition  of  his  valour  was  presented  with  two  villages  (by  name 
Sonkha  and  Mohuri)  on  the  north  bank  of  the  Mahanadi  river,  three  miles 
south  of  the  present  Baramba  headquarters.  These  two  villages  were  then 
owned  and  inhabited  by  Kandhs.  Hatakeshwar  drove  them  away  to  about 
four  miles  north  and  settled  in  Baramba,  which  has  since  been  the  residence 
of  all  his  successors  up  to  the  present  time.  The  two  villages,  Sonkha  and 
Mohuri,  which  were  close  to  one  another,  have  since  been  amalgamated  into 
one,  and  are  known  by  the  name  of  Sonkhameri.  It  is  difficult  to  ascertain 
what  was  the  area  of  the  two  villages  when  they  were  presented  by  the 
Orissa  ruler,  but  in  all  probability  it  never  exceeded  four  square  miles.  The 
founder,  however,  extended  the  limit  of  his  possession  to  about  eight  square 
miles  before  he  died,  leaving  his  younger  brother,  Malakeshwar  Raut,  to 
succeed  him. 

The  second  Chief,  Malakeshwar  Raut,  who  reigned  eighteen  years,  ex- 
tended the  limit  of  the  State  to  Ogalpore,  about  three  miles  west  of  Sonk- 
hameri, and  five  miles  south-west  of  Baramba.  He  discovered  the  temple 
of  the  goddess  Votaika  or  Bruhadamba  or  Bodama  at  Ogalpore,  and  out  of 
respect  for  this  goddess  named  the  State  after  her.  Jambeshwar  Raut,  the 
fourth  Chief,  who  reigned  from  1375  A.D.  to  1416,  conquered  the  Kandh 
Chief  of  Kharod,  eight  miles  north-west  of  Baramba,  and  annexed  his  posses- 
sion (about  twenty  square  miles),  thus  raising  the  area  of  the  State  to  about 
thirty-six  square  miles.  The  fifth  Chief,  Bholeshwar  Raut,  conquered  the 
Khandayat  or  Chief  of  Amatia,  six  miles  west  of  Baramba,  and  extended  the 
limit  of  the  State  to  Ratapat,  eight  miles  west  of  the  headquarters,  and  the 
present  boundary  between  the  Baramba  and  Narsinghpur  States.  It  was 
during  the  reign  of  this  Chief,  who  reigned  for  forty-three  years  (from 
1416  A.D.  to  1459),  that  the  farthest  western  limit  of  the  State  was  reached. 
His  successors  increased  their  possessions  to  the  east  of  the  headquarters, 
but  made  no  attempt  to  extend  the  State  farther  on  the  west.  Kanhu  Raut, 
the  sixth  Chief,  reigned  for  fifty-five  years  (from  1459  A.D.  to  1514),  and 
extended  the  limit  of  the  State  to  Mohulia,  about  five  miles  east  of  Baramba. 
Nabin  Raut,  the  ninth  Chief,  reigned  for  twenty-three  years  (from  1537  A.D. 
to  1560).  During  his  reign  the  State  attained  its  largest  limit,  from  Ratapat 
in  the  west  to  Bidharpur  in  the  east,  eighteen  miles,  and  from  the  range  of 
hills  separating  Hindol  from  Baramba  to  the  banks  of  the  Mahanadi,  about 
eight  and  a  half  miles,  and  this  is  the  present  limit  of  the  State.  In  the 
reign  of  the  twelfth  Chief,  Krishna  Chandra  Mangraj,  who  ruled  from 
1635  A'D-  t°  I^5°j  tne  Mahrattas  invaded  the  country,  but  the  Chief  acknow- 
ledged their  supremacy,  and  was  required  to  pay  a  tribute  of  6335  kahans  of 
cowries  per  annum.  Padmanava  Birbar  Mangraj  Mahapatra,  the  seventeenth 
Chief  of  the  State,  was  a  very  weak  ruler,  who  reigned  from  1748  A.D.  to 
1793.  During  the  first  part  of  his  reign  the  Raja  of  Khandpara  invaded  the 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  55 

State,  drove  out  the  Chief,  and  remained  in  possession  of  it  for  nearly 
thirteen  months.  Raja  Padmanava  sought  for  and  obtained  the  assistance 
of  the  Raja  of  Khurda,  and  recovered  possession  of  the  State.  During  the 
latter  part  of  his  reign,  in  the  year  1775,  the  Raja  of  Narsinghpur  invaded  the 
State,  and  took  possession  of  two  of  its  important  forts,  Kharad  and  Ratapat. 
The  Raja  was  powerless  to  expel  the  invaders,  so  he  appealed  to  the  Mah- 
rattas,  and  with  their  assistance  and  intercession  was  able  to  regain  possession 
of  the  forts.  It  seems  that  the  Mughals  never  exercised  direct  supremacy 
over  the  Chiefs  of  this  State.  The  Mahrattas,  however,  did  so,  and 
there  are  letters  extant  which  show  that  they  fixed  the  annual  tribute 
of  the  State  from  the  year  1183  to  1185  Amli,  and  collected  the  same 
directly  from  the  Chiefs.  There  are  also  three  other  old  letters  of 
interest  in  the  records.  In  one  of  these  the  Mahrattas  intimate  their 
having  recovered  the  Ratapat  Gur  from  the  Narsinghpur  Raja ;  in  another 
they  required  the  presence  of  the  Baramba  Raja  to  settle  a  boundary 
dispute  between  Baramba  and  Narsinghpur ;  the  third  is  addressed  to  the 
Raja  of  Narsinghpur,  and  contains  the  decision  of  the  Mahratta  Govern 
ment  regarding  the  possession  of  Kharad  and  Ratapat.  The  area  of  the 
State  (which  is  one  of  the  Orissa  Tributary  Mahals)  is  about  134  square 
miles;  its  population  29,772,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  over  3000  belonging 
to  aboriginal  tribes.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  709  infantry 
and  3  guns.  The  family  emblem  is  a  leopard. 

Residence. — Baramba,  Orissa. 


56  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BARAUNDHA,  RAJA  THAKUR  PRASAD  SINGH,  Rdjd 

Bahadur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  in  1847  >  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  i8th  August  1886.  Is  a 
Raghubansi  Rajput,  descended  from  a  family  of  the  highest  antiquity  in 
Central  India.  Thirty-four  generations  are  said  to  have  ruled  at  Rusin  in 
the  Banda  district ;  then  four  more  at  Birgarh  in  the  territory  still  belonging 
to  the  family ;  four  more  at  Murfa,  partly  in  Banda  and  partly  in  this  terri- 
tory. Then  the  Raja  Mohan  Singh  came  to  Baraundha,  and  ruled  there, 
and  obtained  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1807.  His  son  ruled 
at  Paturkuchar,  and  two  more  generations.  Then  the  Raja  Ragbirdayal, 
father  of  the  present  Raja,  ruled  partly  at  Paturkuchar,  partly  at  Baraundha, 
and  received  the  additional  title  of  "Bahadur"  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  1877.  The  area  of  the  State  is  239 
square  miles;  its  population  is  17,283,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  Bahadur 
maintains  a  military  force  of  15  cavalry,  75  infantry,  and  6  guns,  and  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Baraundha,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


BARDIA,  Rao  of.     See  Barra. 

BARIYA,  MAHARAWAL  SHRI  MANSINGHJI,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  4th  October  1855;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  March  1864. 
Descended  (like  the  Chiefs  of  Chhota  Udaipur)  from  a  Chauhan  Rajput  (Hindu) 
family,  sprung  from  Patai  Rawal,  the  last  Chauhan  Chief  of  Champanir.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  873  square  miles  ;  its  population  is  66,822,  chiefly  Hindus. 
The  Maharawal  maintains  a  military  force  of  38  cavalry,  250  infantry,  and 
3  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Bariya,  Rewa"  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

BARJORJI  DORABJI  PATEL,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Quetta,  Baluchistan. 

BARJORJI  RUSTAMJI,  MISTRY,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890, 
Residence. — B  ombay . 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  57 


BARODA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  SAYAJI  RAO  III., 
G.  C.S.I.,  Maharaja   Gaekwdr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief,  and  one  of  the  Premier  Princes  of  the  Empire. 

Born  1 7th  March  1863  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  2yth  May  1875. 
The  Gaekwar's  full  titles  are — His  Highness  Farzand-i-Khas-i-Daulat-i-Inglishia 
Maharaja  Sayaji  Rao  Gaekwar  Sena  Khas  Khel  Shamsher  Bahadur, 
Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India. 
He  is  the  descendant  of  the  famous  Mahratta  leader,  Damaji  Gaekwar,  who 
obtained  from  the  Shahu  Raja  of  Satara  the  title  of  Shamsher  Bahadur  for 
his  bravery  at  the  battle  of  Ballapur,  fought  against  the  Imperial  forces  of 
Delhi  at  the  close  of  the  i7th  century.  Damaji  Gaekwar  died  in  1721,  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  nephew  and  adopted  son  Pilaji  Gaekwar,  who  obtained 
from  the  Shahu  Raja  the  additional  title  of  Send  Khas  Khel  (see  Introduction, 
§  1 1)  on  the  conclusion  of  the  wars  with  the  Peshwa.  Pilaji  was  assassinated  in 
1731,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Damaji  II. ;  who,  during  a  period  of  about 
forty  years  of  almost  incessant  warfare,  played  a  most  prominent  part  in  the 
history  of  India,  and  firmly  established  the  Gaekwari  power  throughout 
Gujarat  and  the  neighbouring  districts  of  Western  India.  In  1732,  the  same 
year  in  which  his  father  was  murdered  by  a  Mughal  emissary,  he  reconquered 
the  capital  of  Gujarat,  Baroda,  from  the  Mughal  Viceroy ;  and  that  city  has 
been  the  capital  of  the  Gaekwars  ever  since.  He  commanded  a  division  at 
the  great  and  decisive  battle  of  Panipat  in  1761.  He  invaded  Kathiawar, 
and  forced  many  of  its  princes  to  pay  him  tribute ;  he  conquered  the  ancient 
city  of  Anhalwara  Patan,  and  also  Ahmadabad,  the  old  capital  of  Gujarat. 
After  his  death, .  his  two  sons  Govind  Rao  and  Fatheh  Singh  became 
Gaekwars  in  succession ;  and  the  latter  was  succeeded  by  Ananda  Rao,  a 
son  of  Govind  Rao  Gaekwar.  In  1803  a  Treaty  was  concluded  with  the 
British  Power,  under  which  a  British  Resident  was  appointed  to  the  Court  of 
Baroda,  and  provision  was  made  for  the  maintenance  of  a  strong  subsidiary 
force.  Ananda  Rao  was  succeeded  by  Sayaji  Rao  I.,  whose  reign  was  long 
and  on  the  whole  prosperous ;  and  he  was  followed  by  three  of  his  sons  in 
turn,  Ganpat  Rao  Gaekwar,  Khande  Rao  Gaekwar,  and  Mulhar  Rao 
Gaekwar.  His  Highness  Khande  Rao  Gaekwar  rendered  loyal  service  to 
the  Government  at  the  time  of  the  Mutiny.  But  the  rule  of  his  successor 
was  disgraced  by  misgovernment ;  and  it  terminated  in  his  deposition  under 
painful  circumstances.  After  these  misfortunes,  the  Paramount  Power  exer- 
cised the  greatest  care  and  diligence  in  seeking  out,  from  among  the 
scions  of  the  Gaekwari  family  and  the  descendants  of  Pilaji,  a  successor 
to  the  gadi,  who  should  be  in  every  way  well  fitted  to  discharge  the  duties 
of  that  exalted  station.  Their  care  has  been  amply  rewarded ;  for,  by  the 
consent  of  the  whole  world,  it  would  be  impossible  to  find  a  ruler  more 
devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  subjects,  or  one  better  qualified  to  do  credit 
to  the  Imperial  choice,  than  His  Highness  the  present  Maharaja  Gaek- 
war, who  was  adopted  by  Her  Highness  the  Maharani  Jamna  Bai,  the 
widowed  consort  of  Khande  Rao  Gaekwar — and  installed  by  the  Agent  of 
the  Governor -General,  who  invested  him  with  a  State  Dress  of  Honour  on 
the  27th  May  1875. 

The  reign  of  the  Maharaja  Gaekwar  Sayaji  III.  has  been  one  of  amazing 
progress  and  prosperity.  For  His  Highness  himself,  it  has  not  been  without 


58  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

the  deep  shadows  of  domestic  bereavement;  for  in  April  1885  he  lost 
his  first  wife,  Her  Highness  the  Maharani  Chimnabai,  niece  of  the  Princess 
of  Tanjore,  whom  he  had  married  in  1880,  and  who  had  borne  him  three 
children — two  daughters,  who  had  died  during  the  lifetime  of  their  mother, 
and  a  son  and  heir  named  Fatheh  Singh  Rao,  who  has  happily  survived.  In 
December  1885  His  Highness  took  as  his  second  wife  a  Princess  of  the 
House  of  Dewas  in  Central  India,  Her  Highness  Chimnabai,  the  present 
Maharani,  who  was  invested  by  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen 
Empress  with  the  insignia  of  the  Imperial  Order  of  the  Crown  of  India  in 
1892.  Of  this  marriage  there  has  been  issue  two  sons,  named  Jaisingh 
Rao  and  Sivaji  Rao  respectively,  and  a  Princess  named  Indira  Raja. 

The  young  Gaekwar  had  for  several  years  the  advantage  of  the  co-opera- 
tion, as  Minister  of  Baroda,  of  one  of  the  ablest  Indian  statesmen  of  modern 
times,  the  Raja  Sir  Madhava  Rao,  K. C.S.I.  The  colleagues  and  successors 
of  Sir  Madhava— the  Khan  Bahadur  Kazi  Shahab-ud-din,  C.I.E.,  the  Diwan 
Bahadur  Laxuman  Jagannath,  the  Khan  Bahadur  Pestanji  Jahangirji,  C.I.E., 
the  Rao  Bahadur  Vinayak  Janardhan  Kirtane,  the  Khan  Bahadur  Khurshidji 
Rustamji,  and  the  present  Prime  Minister,  His  Excellency  the  Diwan  Bahadur 
Manibhai  Jasbhai — have  also  been  statesmen  of  great  ability  and  devotion. 
And  many  other  names  might  be  mentioned  of  distinguished  officers  of  the 
Baroda  Government  during  the  present  reign.  The  early  years  of  His 
Highness  were  guided  by  the  judicious  care  of  an  extremely  able  and 
sympathetic  English  gentleman,  Mr.  F.  A.  H.  Elliot,  C.I.E.,  who  still  retains 
high  office  in  the  Baroda  State.  In  1875  tne  Gaekwar,  attended  by  Sir 
Madhava  Rao  and  the  chief  officers  of  the  State,  went  to  Bombay  to  meet 
His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales ;  and  shortly  afterwards  was 
honoured  by  a  visit  of  His  Royal  Highness  to  the  capital  of  Baroda,  where 
the  auspicious  event  was  celebrated  by  the  most  magnificent  hospitalities. 
On  the  ist  of  January  1877  His  Highness,  on  the  invitation  of  H.E.  the 
Viceroy,  attended  the  Imperial  Assembly  at  Delhi  to  celebrate  the  Proclama- 
tion of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen  as  Empress  of  India,  and 
on  that  occasion  was  invested  with  the  title  of  Farzand-i-Khds-i-Daulat-i- 
Inglishia  (see  Introduction,  §  n)  by  Lord  Lytton  as  the  representative  of  the 
Empress. 

In  May  1887  His  Highness,  accompanied  by  the  Maharani,  set  out  on 
an  extended  tour  to  the  continent  of  Europe.  After  passing  several  months 
in  Italy,  Switzerland,  and  France,  His  Highness  arrived  in  England  in  the 
following  November.  On  the  5th  of  December  the  Maharaja  proceeded  to 
Windsor,  and  had  the  honour  of  being  most  cordially  received  by  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress.  His  Highness,  having  previously 
received  the  honour  of  Knighthood,  was  on  this  occasion  invested  by  the 
Queen  Empress  with  the  insignia  of  a  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most 
Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  A  second  visit  was  paid  to  Europe  by 
His  Highness  in  1889,  which  also  greatly  restored  his  health  and  vigour. 
But  the  hot  climate  of  Gujarat,  and  excessive  mental  exertion,  made  it  im- 
perative on  him  in  the  spring  of  1892  to  visit  Europe  once  more;  and 
accordingly  His  Highness  left  India  a  third  time  on  7th  May  1892.  With 
the  Maharani  he  has  again  been  graciously  received  by  Her  Majesty,  who 
honoured  the  Maharani  by  personally  conferring  on  her  the  insignia  of  the 
Imperial  Order  of  the  Crown  of  India.  These  visits  of  His  Highness  to 
England  have  been  fruitful  of  the  most  valuable  results  to  the  Baroda  State, 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  59 

and  are  in  themselves  evidence  of  the  interest  he  takes  in  the  social  and 
material  progress  of  his  people.  Both  in  1887  and  again  in  1892,  he  has 
been  attended  by  one  of  his  ablest  officials,  the  Rajashri  Vasudeo  Madhava 
Samarth,  who  now  holds  the  position  of  Chief  Officer  with  His  Highness. 

By  the  direction  of  His  Highness  scientific  land-revenue  survey  has  been 
introduced  throughout  the  State,  the  existing  revenue  laws  have  been  revised, 
new  ones  framed,  and  various  restrictions  and  petty  imposts,  as  well  as 
transit  duties,  which  entailed  much  hardship  on  the  ryots,  have  been  gradu- 
ally abolished.  By  these  and  various  other  means,  the  cultivators  have  been 
greatly  encouraged  to  increase  their  holdings  and  improve  their  condition. 
The  existing  local  regulations  are  being  codified  for  securing  a  speedy  and 
efficient  administration  of  civil  and  criminal  justice,  in  which  work  he  has 
allowed  the  people  to  take  part.  His  Highness  has  issued  certain  rules  for 
the  better  working  of  the  Police,  and  has  brought  up  the  military  forces 
to  a  state  of  efficiency.  But  the  greatest  attention  of  the  Maharaja  Gaekwar 
has  been  given  to  matters  of  education.  He  has  given  a  strong  impetus  to 
primary  and  higher  education,  as  well  as  to  technical  training  in  industrial 
arts  and  handicrafts.  There  is  an  Arts  College  at  Baroda,  which  is  affiliated 
to  the  Bombay  University,  and  teaches  up  to  the  B.A.  and  B.Sc.  standards. 
The  vernacular  schools  have  received  a  large  accession  to  their  number,  and 
are  still  to  be  further  multiplied  by  the  establishment  of  thirty  new  schools 
every  year.  A  recent  rule  to  recognise  by  Government  grants-in-aid  every 
school  which  'has  not  less  than  sixteen  scholars  on  its  roll  has  called  into  exist- 
ence hundreds  of  village  schools  for  the  instruction  of  the  masses,  hitherto 
untouched.  Schools  have  also  been  opened  for  people  of  low  castes,  and 
boarding  schools  for  the  lowest  and  hitherto  utterly  neglected  classes. 

Classes  for  teaching  native  music  and  scientific  agriculture  have  been 
opened,  whilst  the  establishment  of  a  technical  school  for  imparting  a  know- 
ledge of  modern  industries,  and  for  improving  the  various  handicrafts  of  the 
people,  testifies  to  the  anxiety  His  Highness  entertains  for  the  industrial 
progress  of  his  State.  Nor  has  the  Maharaja  Gaekwar  forgotten  the  claims 
of  female  education,  for  in  the  various  schools  in  his  dominions  not  only  are 
girls  given  a  sound  mental  training,  but  the  physical  training  and  the  homely 
arts  of  sewing,  embroidery,  and  cookery  are  not  neglected.  Hospitals  and 
dispensaries  have  been  provided  in  almost  all  the  principal  towns  of  the  State ; 
and  it  has  been  lately  decided  to  appoint  a  lady-doctor  for  administering  to 
the  medical  needs  of  the  female  population.  The  magnificent  new  Palace, 
and  various  handsome  buildings  for  schools,  colleges,  and  hospitals,  evince 
the  keen  desire  of  His  Highness  for  the  promotion  of  public  works.  Rail- 
ways have  been  extended  in  the  territory  of  Baroda,  and  at  present  the  State 
owns  no  less  than  178  miles  of  railway.  One  of  the  most  important  recent 
engineering  undertakings  is  the  construction  of  extensive  works  at  Ajwa  for 
supplying  the  city  of  Baroda  with  pure  water  at  the  cost  of  about  thirty  lacs 
of  rupees. 

The  effects  of  the  good  and  enlightened  government  of  the  present 
Gaekwar,  and  the  consequent  progress  and  prosperity  of  his  State  and  people, 
were  well  summed  up  in  a  speech  made  by  the  late  Viceroy  of  India,  Lord 
Dufferin,  on  the  occasion  of  His  Excellency's  visit  to  Baroda  in  November 
1886,  from  which  may  be  quoted  the  following  words  : — 

"Although  your  Highness,  with „ characteristic  modesty,  has  passed  very 
lightly  over  the  many  excellent  works  of  a  like  nature  which  have  been  con- 


60  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

structed  under  your  auspices,  all  who  are  inhabitants  of  this  place  know  that, 
thanks  to  the  intelligent  energy  which  has  been  exhibited  by  their  ruler,  few 
cities  and  few  States  have  ever  made  greater  progress  in  everything  which  tends 
to  improve  the  social  condition  of  their  inhabitants  than  the  State  and  city  over 
which  your  Highness  so  auspiciously  and  benevolently  rules.  The  air  of 
universal  prosperity  which  characterises  your  capital  and  district  which  surrounds  it, 
the  happy  and  contented  appearance  of  your  people,  are  all  marks  of  conscientious 
and  intelligent  administration,  which  have  met  my  eye  on  every  side  ;  the  noble 
buildings  which  are  rising  in  all  directions  under  your  Highness's  auspices,  and 
amply  generous  provision  which  you  have  made  both  for  the  needs  and  gratifica- 
tion of  your  people,  have  confirmed  me  in  the  opinion  which  I  had  already  reason 
to  entertain,  that  in  your  Highness  India  possesses  one  of  the  most  promising, 
high-minded,  and  wise  rulers  with  which  she  has  been  ever  blessed.  It  is  diffi- 
cult to  convey  in  words  the  satisfaction  which  a  Viceroy  experiences  at  being  able 
to  arrive  at  such  a  conclusion  in  regard  to  one  of  the  most  influential  and  import- 
ant of  Her  Majesty's  feudatory  Princes.  In  your  Highness  I  feel  the  Queen 
Empress  possesses  indeed  the  noble  arkan-i-dawlut,  a  firm  and  trusted  pillar  of 
State,  and  that  the  Indian  Government  is  entitled  to  regard  you  as  a  sympathetic 
and  worthy  coadjutor  in  its  great  work  of  advancing  the  general  happiness  and 
prosperity  of  the  inhabitants  of  Hindustan.  Believe  me,  Mahd.rd.jd,  there  is  no 
object  dearer  to  my  heart  than  to  acquire  the  confidence  and  goodwill  of  the 
Princes  of  India,  to  make  them  feel  with  what  kindly  feelings  I  regard  them,  how 
anxious  I  am  in  respect  to  their  rights,  to  maintain  their  dignity,  to  add  to  their 
consideration  and  izzat  ;  but  it  becomes  ten  times  easier  to  do  this,  and  is  a 
more  perfect  labour  of  love,  when  the  conduct  of  a'  native  ruler  is  so  worthy  of 
praise  and  admiration  as  your  own." 

The  State  is  one  of  the  largest,  richest,  most  populous,  and  most  advanced 
in  India.  It  contains  an  area  of  8570  square  miles.  Its  population  is 
about  2,185,005,  chiefly  Hindus;  but  there  are  174,980  Muhammadans, 
46,718  Jains,  and  8118  Parsis.  The  revenue  of  the  State  is  about 
Rs.  i, 53,00,000  per  annum  (at  par  ,£1,530,000).  In  area  the  State  of 
Baroda  is  considerably  larger  than  either  Saxony  or  Wiirtemberg ;  its 
population  is  greater  than  that  of  Greece,  and  not  much  less  than  that  of 
Switzerland.  The  Maharaja  Gaekwar  maintains  a  military  force  of  3562 
cavalry  and  4988  infantry,  with  38  guns.  His  Highness  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  2 1  guns.  The  family  colour  is  that  red  which  is  called  Bhagwd, 
the  colour  of  the  red  earth  of  the  Mahabaleshwar  hills. 

Residence. — Baroda,  Western  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  61 

BARODA  or  SHBOPUR  (GWALIOR),  RAJA  BIJAI  SINGH, 

Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1862  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  271)1  September  1865.  Is  a  Kshatri 
Gaur  (Hindu).  The  area  of  the  State  is  150  square  miles;  its  population 
9000,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  50  cavalry, 
400  infantry,  and  5  guns. 

Residence. — Baroda,  Gwalior,  Central  India. 

BARRA  or  BARDIA,  RAO  DAUKAL  SINGH,  Rao  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Rao  was  born  in  1850;  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  25th 
August  1865.  Is  of  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  population  of  the  State 
is  about  650,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Barra,  Western  Malwa",  Central  India. 

BARWANI  (BHOPAWAR),  RANA  INDARJIT  SINGH,  Rdnd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1840;  'succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  i5th  August  1880.  Is  a 
Sisodiya  Rajput,  akin  to  the  ruling  House  of  Udaipur.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  1362  square  miles;  its  population  56,445,  chiefly  Hindus,  with 
8605  belonging  to  aboriginal  tribes.  The  Rana  maintains  a  miltary  force  of 
17  cavalry,  225  infantry,  and  9  guns.  He  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9 
guns. 

Residence. — Barwdni,  Central  India. 

BASANTA  SINGH,  CHAUDHRI,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893.     Is  a 
landholder  in  the  Bijnor  district,  North-Western  Provinces. 
Residence. — Bijnor,  North-Western  Provinces. 

BASAWA  SINGH  (of  Laroa),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Jdlandhar,  Punjab. 

BASHAHR,  RAJA  SHAMSHER,  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1839;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1849.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family  claiming  descent,  through  120  generations,  from  Sri 
Krishna.  It  is  said  that  Parduman  Singh,  grandson  of  Sri  Krishna,  came  to 
Bashahr  from  Benares  to  marry  the  daughter  of  the  Raja  Bavasa  Deo ;  and 
that  he  ultimately  slew  Bavasa  Deo,  and  obtained  possession  of  the  Raj. 
Between  1803  and  1815  Bashahr  was  overrun  by  the  Gurkhas;  but  on 
their  expulsion  in  the  latter  year,  the  British  Government  granted  a  sanad  to 
the  Raja,  confirming  him  in  the  possession  of  all  his  territories,  except 


62  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Rawani,  which  was  given  to  Keonthal.     The  area  of  the  State  (which  is  one 
of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  is  3257  square  miles;  its  population  is  64,345, 
chiefly  Hindus.     The  Raja  has  a  son  named  Tika  Raghunath  Singh.     He 
maintains  a  military  force  of  100  infantry  and  2  guns. 
Residence. — Bashahr,  Punjab. 

BASHIR  AHMAD,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1860.  Is  the  son-in-law  of  His  late  Highness  Prince  Intizam-ul- 
Mulk,  third  Prince  of  Arcot.  Granted  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  in 
1887. 

Residence. — Madras. 

BASHIYAM  AIYANGAR,  V.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Is  a  B.A.  and  B.L.  of  the  University  of  Madras;  appointed  a  Fellow  of 
the  University  in  1880;  Member  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  Fort  St. 
George  in  1888;  granted  the  title  as  a  personal' distinction  in  1887.  An 
advocate  of  the  Madras  Bar. 

Residence. — Madras. 


BASITNAGAR,  AMANAT  PATIMA,  Begum  of. 

Born  1832.  Is  the  widow  of  the  Nawab  Dost  Ali  Khan  of  Basitnagar, 
who  was  succeeded  on  his  death  in  1864  by  the  Nawab  Husain  Ali  Khan. 
On  the  death  of  the  latter  in  1871  the  Begum  succeeded  to  the  title  and 
estates.  The  family  is  of  Pathan  origin,  and  is  descended  from  Dildar  Khan, 
third  son  of  the  Nawab  Diler  Khan  of  Shahabad.  The  latter  was  a  dis- 
tinguished Afghan  officer  under  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb,  who  sent  him  to 
Shahabad  to  punish  the  Pande  Panwar  Brahmans,  who  had  plundered  a 
convoy  of  Imperial  treasure  on  its  way  from  Khairabad  to  Delhi.  He  slew 
all  the  bandits,  and  was  granted  their  extensive  possessions  mjdgir,  with  the 
titles  of  Nawab  and  Haft  Hazdri  or  commander  of  seven  thousand.  He 
founded  the  city  of  Shahabad,  and  built  the  great  fort  known  as  the  Bari 
Deohri ;  and  his  descendants  held  the  grants  rent  free  till  Saadat  Ali  Khan 
resumed  them.  The  title  of  Nawab  was  recognised  by  Government  as 
hereditary  in  1864. 

Residence. — Shdhabad,  Hardoi,  Oudh. 

BASODA  (BHOPAL),  NAWAB  AMAR  ALI  KHAN,  Nawab  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Nawab  was  born  about  1830;  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the 
6th  February  1864.  He  is  a  Pathan  (Muhammadan)  descended  from  the 
Nawab  Dalel  Khan,  founder  of  the  Kurwai  State  (q.v.)  The  area  of  the 
State  is  about  22  square  miles;  its  population  7772,  chiefly  Hindus,  but 
with  1454  Muhammadans.  His  sons  are — Mian  Haidar  Ali  Khan  and 
Yusuf  Ali  Khan. 

Residence. — Basoda,  Bhopal,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  63 

BASTAR,  RAJA  BHAIRAM  DEO,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  2ist  May  1839  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  27th  August  1853.  Belongs 
to  an  ancient  Rajput  family  of  high  caste  ;  whose  founder,  Kakati  Partabrudra, 
came  from  Warangal  in  the  Deccan,  and  settled  at  Bastar  about  the  beginning 
of  the  1 4th  century.  The  area  of  the  State  is  13,062  square  miles;  its 
population  196,248,  of  whom  over  36,000  belong  to  Gond,  Bhil,  and  other 
aboriginal  tribes,  the  rest  being  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Jagdalpur,  Bastar,  Central  Provinces. 

BASTI,  Rdjd  of.     See  Mahesh  Sitla  Bakhsh  Singh. 

BAW,  MAUNG  HLAING,  Ngwegunhmu  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Ngwegunhmu  is  one  of  the  Shan  Chiefs,  and  rules  over  a  State  of 
about  350  square  miles. 

Residence. — Baw,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

*BAWNIN,  SAW  KIN,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  one  of  the  Shan  Chiefs,  and  rules  over  a  State  of  30  square 
miles. 

Residence. — Bawnin,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

BAWZAING-,  MAUNG  KYA  YWBT,  Ngwegunhmu  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Ngwegunhmu  is  one  of  the  Shan  Chiefs,  and  rules  over  a  State  of 
20  square  miles. 

Residence. — Bawzaing,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

BECHARDAS  VEHARIDAS,  DESAI,  Sarddr,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  26th  February  1844.  Third  son  of  the  Rao  Bahadur  Desai 
Veharidas  Ajubhai,  whose  eldest  son,  Desai  Haridas  Veharidas,  is  now  Diwdn 
(Prime  Minister)  of  the  Junagarh  State  in  Kathiawar.  Educated  at  Nadiad 
and  Ahmadabad.  Appointed  Member  of  the  Local  Board  of  Taluka  Anand, 
Zilla  Kaira  in  1867.  Was  the  chief  promoter  of  the  "Agricultural  Com- 
mittee" appointed  at  Nadiad  in  1878,  and  of  the  exhibitions  of  agricultural 
products  of  the  district  held  at  Nadiad  since  the  year  1883.  President  of 
the  Municipal  Committee,  Nadiad,  from  1886  to  1889;  received  the  title  of 
"Rao  Bahadur"  from  Government  in  1887;  elected  a  Member  of  the 
Legislative  Council,  Bombay,  in  1888 ;  and  granted  the  title  of  "Sardar"  in 
the  same  year.  The  family  claims  descent  from  the  Kshatriya  family  reigning 
in  the  Punjab  in  the  time  of  Alexander  the  Great ;  subsequently  migrating  to 
Malwa,  its  leading  member  is  said  to  have  been  appointed  there  Diwan. 


64  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Twelve  hundred  years  later  part  of  the  family  is  said  to  have  migrated  to 
Adalaj,  near  Ahmadabad,  in  the  time  of  Siddhraj  Jayasingh,  and  a  branch 
ultimately  settled  at  Nadiad.  The  founder  of  this  branch  having  rendered 
good  service  to  the  then  Mughal  Emperor,  was  invited  to  the  Imperial 
presence,  and  received  the  title  of  Desdi  with  estates  and  pdlkhi  from  the 
Emperor.  Vaghjibhai,  the  fourth  in  lineal  descent  from  the  founder,  rendered 
valuable  services  both  to  the  Peshwa  and  to  the  Gaekwar ;  and  also  played 
an  important  part  in  bringing  about  a  compromise  after  the  battle  of  Adas 
in  1775.  For  this  he  received  in  indm  the  village  of  Bilodra,  which  the 
family  enjoyed  up  to  1816.  Prabhudas,  the  grandson  of  Vaghjibhai,  assisted 
Colonel  Walker  in  settling  the  terms  of  the  treaties  made  by  the  British 
Government  with  the  Mehwasi  Thakurs  in  the  Mahi  Kantha,  and  received  a 
pdlkhi  in  indm  from  the  British  Government  in  1806.  Desai  Prabhudas's 
grandson  was  Desai  Veharidas  Ajubhai  (the  first  mentioned  above),  who  was  a 
member  of  the  Vatan  Commission,  and  Honorary  Second  Class  Magistrate. 
He  was  invited  by  Government  to  the  Imperial  Delhi  Assemblage  in  1877, 
where  he  received  the  title  of  "  Rao  Bahadur." 

Residence. — Kaira,  Bombay. 


BED  SARAN  KUN WAR  (of  Agori  Barhar),  Rdm. 

Born  1851.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Chandel  Rajas  of  Barhar  being 
descended,  it  is  said,  from  Pari  Mai  and  Bari  Mai  of  Mahoba  in  Bundelkhand, 
who  some  hundreds  of  years  ago  took  service  with  Raja  Madan  of  the  Baland 
family  of  the  Kharwar  tribe,  and  after  killing  him,  divided  his  country  and 
founded  the  three  principalities  of  Barhar,  Bijaigarh,  and  Bardi,  in  Rewah. 
About  a  century  later,  near  the  year  1290,  the  exiled  Balands  collected  a 
force,  surprised  the  fort  and  palace  of  Agori,  and  killed  every  male  of  the 
Chandel  race.  But  one  of  the  queens  of  the  fallen  Chandel  Raja,  who  had 
fled  to  the  forest,  shortly  afterwards  gave  birth  to  a  prince,  who  was  named 
Orandeo,  from  the  shield  (oran)  on  which  he  was  cradled.  When  he  grew 
up,  his  merits  attracted  the  notice  of  the  Raja  of  Kantit ;  who  gave  him  his 
daughter  in  marriage,  and  helped  him  to  recover  the  Barhar  Raj,  about  the 
year  1310.  In  1745  Sjambhu  Sah  was  Raja,  and  he  was  conquered  and 
expelled  by  Raja  Balwant  Singh  ;  but  in  1781  Warren  Hastings,  as  Governor- 
General,  ordered  the  restoration  of  Adil  Sah,  the  grandson  of  Raja  Sambhu 
Sah.  The  estates  continued  in  the  possession  of  the  family  till  1852,  when 
Raja  Raghunath  Sah  died,  and  they  came  under  the  Court  of  Wards.  His 
son,  Raja  Kesho  Saran  Sah,  attained  his  majority  in  1868 ;  but  died  without 
issue  in  1871,  leaving  his  widow,  the  present  Rani,  in  possession  of  the 
estates  for  her  life.  Her  heir  is  Babu  Jagannath  Prasad  Singh  of  Jamgaon, 
who  is  descended  from  Babu  Rachpal  Singh  (brother  of  Raja  Adil  Sah, 
mentioned  above),  and  is  about  35  years  of  age. 

Residence. — Rajpur,  Mirzapur,  North- Western  Provinces. 

BBHRAMJI  DADABHAI,  Khan  Bahddur. 

Born  23rd  October  1831.  The  Khan  Bahadur's  name  is  also  sometimes 
spelt  Byramjee  Dadabhoy.  The  title  was  conferred  on  3rd  April  1880,  as  a 
personal  distinction,  in  recognition  of  highly  meritorious  service  in  many 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  65 

important  and  responsible  public  offices.  The  Khan  Bahadur  is  the  eldest 
son  of  the  late  Khan  Saheb  Dadabhai  Shapurji,  an  eminent  public  servant, 
who  had  received  a  sherpao  (or  "  Dress  of  Honour  ")  from  the  Bombay 
Government  in  1837,  and  the  title  of  Khan  Saheb  in  1847.  Educated  at 
Thanna,  and  Surat,  and  Elphinstone  College,  Bombay.  Entered  the  Govern- 
ment Service  in  1853;  and  having  distinguished  himself  in  various  civil 
capacities,  was  specially  selected  in  1865  to  succeed  Colonel  Dunsterville  as 
Deputy  Registrar-General  and  Registrar  of  Bombay — being  the  first  gentle- 
man of  Indian  birth  ever  appointed  to  fill  that  high  office.  Appointed  J.P. 
in  1869;  in  1872  a  Delegate  of  the  Parsi  Chief  Matrimonial  Court  in 
Bombay;  in  1879  acted  as  Inspector-General  of  Registration  ;  in  1878,  and 
again  in  1880,  elected  a  Member  of  the  Municipal  Corporation  of  the  City 
of  Bombay ;  and  served  in  many  other  public  orifices  "  with  credit  to  himself 
and  advantage  to  the  public,"  as  testified  by  the  Bombay  Government  when 
in  1880  he  was  recommended  for  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur.  He  was 
married,  28th  February  1848,  to  Baie  Sonabaie,  eldest  daughter  of  Khan 
Saheb  Cowashaw  Sorabshaw  Taleiyarkhan  of  Surat  •  and  has  issue.  His 
sons  are — (i)  Jehangeer  Byramjee  Dadabhoy,  born  1864,  married  1885  to 
Khorsetbanu  Hormusjee  Pestonjee  Cama ;  and  (2)  Manikji  Behramji 
Dadabhai,  born  1865,  barrister-at-law  of  the  Middle  Temple  1887,  J.P.  for 
Bombay  1888,  Municipal  Councillor  for  Bombay  1889;  married  1884  to 
Jerbanu  Dadabhai  Palanji  Bhedwar.  His  daughters  are — (i)  Awabaie, 
born  1851,  married  1865  to  Ardasir  Cursetji  Ghandie,  who  died  in  1874; 

(2)  Dhanbaiji,  born  1859,  married  1877  to  Dhanjibhoy  Nasirwanji  Ghista  ; 

(3)  Pherozebaie,  born    1861,  married    1877   to   Framji   Cursetji   Rustamji 
Thanawala.     His  brothers  are — (i)  Cowashaw  Dadabhoy,  born  1845,  married 
1865    to  Jerbaie  Bargorji   Hadda ;    (2)   Cursetjee  Dadabhoy,  born   1850, 
married  1886  to  Gulbaie  Jamsetjee  Seenawala. 

Residence. — Foras  Road,  Byculla,  Bombay. 

BEHRAMJI  JEHANGIRJI  RAJ  KOTWALA,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  24th  May  1889,  in  recognition 
of  his  public  services.  The  Khan  Bahadur's  name  is  also  sometimes  spelt 
Byramjee  (or  Byramji)  Jehanghirji  Rajkotwala.  Iso  a  Delegate  of  the  Parsi 
Matrimonial  Court  at  Karachi,  and  Member  of  the  Sindh  Sabha ;  was 
Honorary  Special  Magistrate  at  Nasik  and  Karachi  from  1869  to  1890; 
acted  as  Chairman  of  the  Nasik  Municipality  in  1880  and  1883. 

Residence. —  Karachi,  Sind. 

BBLASAR  PARIDA,  Sdmant  Rai. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  not  to  have  been  formally  recognised 
by  Government.  It  was  originally  obtained  from  one  of  the  old  Rajas  of 
Kujung. 

Residence. — Cuttack,  Orissa. 

BBLI  RAM,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893,  for  emi- 
nent services  in  the  Lahore  Medical  College.     Is  an  Assistant  Surgeon. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

F 


€6  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BENARES,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SIR  PRABHU  NARAYAN  SINGH, 
K.C.I.E.,  Maharaja  Bahadur  of. 

Born  26th  November  1855;  succeeded  i3th  June  1889;  has  issue — 
Kunwar  Aditya  Narayan  Singh,  born  6th  November  1875.  The  family  are 
Brahmans  of  the  Bhuinhar  clan ;  and  their  traditions  go  back  to  the  year 
1000,  when  a  Brahman  ascetic  of  Utaria,  a  village  near  Benares,  foretold  the 
.succession  of  his  posterity  to  the  dominions  then  governed  by  a  Hindu  Raja. 
Some  centuries  later,  in  the  decay  of  the  Mughal  Empire,  some  of  the  family 
who  attempted  to  assert  a  turbulent  independence  were  severely  chastised  by 
one  of  the  lieutenants  of  the  Emperor  Farrukhsiyar.  In  the  succeeding 
reign  Mausa  Ram,  the  eldest  brother  of  the  branch  occupying  the  ancient 
seat  of  the  family  in  Utaria,  rose  to  great  favour  with  the  Governor  of 
Benares  under  the  Nawab  Vazir  of  Oudh.  On  the  death  of  Mausa  Ram  in 
1739  his  son  Balwant  Singh  sent  an  offering  to  Delhi,  and  received  from  the 
Emperor  his  confirmation  in  the  government  of  the  Jaunpur,  Benares,  and 
Chunar  districts,  with  the  possession  in  his  own  right  of  four  Parganas,  and 
the  title  of  Raja  Bahadur,  which  the  family  has  held  as  an  hereditary  title 
ever  since.  In  1763,  when  the  Emperor  and  the  Nawab  Vazir  of  Oudh 
marched  eastward  to  expel  the  British  from  Bengal,  Raja  Balwant  Singh  was 
compelled  to  join  them,  but  his  troops  took  no  part  in  the  battle  of  Baksar, 
being  stationed  on  the  other  side  of  the  Ganges,  and  when  he  fled  to  one  of 
his  hill  fortresses  he  was  called  back  to  receive  confirmation  of  his  posses- 
sions under  the  British  Power.  On  the  death  of  Balwant  Singh  in  1770  the 
Nawab  Vazir  of  Oudh  desired  to  seize  the  Benares  territory,  but  the  British 
Government  compelled  him  to  recognise  Chait  Singh,  the  son  of  Balwant 
Singh,  as  Raja  under  the  British  suzerainty,  and  by  the  treaty  of  1775  tne 
territory  was  finally  declared  British.  The  differences  between  Raja  Chait 
Singh  and  the  Calcutta  Government  under  Warren  Hastings  are  historically 
famous,  as  they  became  the  subject  of  one  of  the  articles  of  the  impeachment 
that  was  framed  against  the  great  Governor-General.  The  Raja  was  deprived 
of  his  government,  which  was  given  on  conditions  to  his  nephew,  Raja 
Mahip  Narayan,  son  of  Balwant  Singh's  daughter,  and  he  died  in  exile  at 
Gwalior  under  the  protection  of  the  Maharaja  Sindhia.  Raja  Mahip  Narayan 
died  in  1795,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Udit  Narayan  Singh;  and  the 
latter  in  1835  by  n^s  nephew  and  adopted  son,  Raja  Ishri  Parshad  Narayan 
Singh  Bahadur,  who,  for  his  loyal  services  at  the  time  of  the  Mutiny,  received 
in  1859  the  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction.  On  the 
ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  was  created  a  Knight 
Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  ;  and  on 
his  death  in  1889  he  was  succeeded  by  his  nephew  and  adopted  son,  the 
present  Raja.  On  the  8th  February  1889  the  late  Maharaja  Bahadur  had 
been  granted  the  privilege,  as  a  personal  distinction,  of  being  addressed  as 
"  His  Highness,"  and  in  September  of  that  year  the  present  Raja  was  granted 
the  same  privilege,  with  the  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur,  also  as  personal  dis- 
tinctions. The  Maharaja  has  been  exempted  from  personal  appearance  in 
the  Civil  Courts,  and  has  been  assured  by  sanad  that,  in  the  case  of  failure  of 
natural  heirs,  the  Government  will  permit  and  confirm  any  adoption  of  a  suc- 
cessor made  by  himself  or  any  future  Raja  that  may  be  in  accordance  with 
Hindu  law  and  the  customs  of  his  family.  He  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  T  3  guns. 

Residences. — Rdmnagar,  Benares  ;  Chakya,  Mirzapur. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  67 


BBNKAT  RAO.     See  Vyankat  Rao 

BBRI  (BUNDBLKHAND),  RAO  BIJAI  SINGH,  Jdgirddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 4th  February  1848  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i8th  March  1862.  Is 
a  Puar  Rajput,  descended  from  Acharjya,  who  married  a  daughter  of  the 
Maharaja  Jagat  Raj,  son  of  the  Maharaja  Chhatarsal  of  Jaitpur,  and  received 
the  jdgir  of  Beri.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Khuman  Singh,  whose 
son,  Jugal  Prasad,  received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government.  His 
grandson,  Bishnath  Singh,  adopted  the  present  Jagirdar,  who  is  a  descendant 
from  the  Maharaja  Jagat  Raj  by  a  collateral  line.  The  title  is  hereditary ; 
the  Jagirdars  have  sometimes  been  styled  Sawai  Rao,  from  their  ancestor 
Jagat  Raj.  The  present  Rao's  son  is  Kunwar  Bahadur  Noni  Raghuraj 
Singh.  The  State  has  an  area  of  about  28  square  miles,  and  a  population  of 
about  5000,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rao  maintains  a  military  force  of  10 
cavalry,  66  infantry,  and  2  guns. 

Residence. — Beri,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


BBTTIAH,  MAHARAJA  SIR  HARBNDRA  KISHOR  SINGH, 
K.O.I.B.,  Maharaja  Bahadur  of. 

Born  in  March  1854;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Maharaja  Rajendra 
Kishor  Singh  Bahadur,  in  1883,  and  in  1884  received  the  title  of  Maharaja 
Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction,  with  a  khilat  and  sanad  from  the  hands  of 
the  Lieutenant-Go vernor  of  Bengal.  Created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the 
Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  on  ist  March  1889.  Belongs  to 
a  Jaitharia  Brahman  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Gangeshwar  Deo,  who 
settled  at  Jaithar  in  Saran,  Bengal,  about  the  year  1244  A.D.  One  of  his 
descendants,  Agar  Sen,  having  possessed  himself  by  force  of  arms  (during 
the  later  years  of  the  reign  of  the  Emperor  Jahangir)  of  a  considerable  terri- 
tory in  Champaran,  declared  himself  a  Raja,  and  ultimately  obtained  a 
confirmation  of  that  title  from  the  Emperor  Shah  Jahan.  In  1659  he  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  Raja  Guj  Singh,  who  built  the  palace  of  the  family  at 
Bettiah.  He  incurred  the  anger  of  the  Emperor  of  Delhi  by  the  annexation 
of  many  surrounding  districts,  and  after  successfully  resisting  one  party  of 
Imperial  troops  sent  against  him,  was  captured  by  a  second  party,  and  carried 
a  prisoner  to  Delhi.  He  was  subsequently  released,  and  confirmed  in  his 
possession,  on  his  undertaking  to  send  an  annual  offering  of  jungle  and  other 
produce  to  Delhi.  He  died  in  1694  A.D.,  leaving  six  sons,  of  whom  three 
died  without  issue.  The  eldest,  Raja  Dalip  Singh,  succeeded  his  father  at 
Bettiah,  the  second  was  the  ancestor  of  Raja  Sheoraj  Nandan  Singh  of 
Seohar  in  Muzaffarpur  (q.v.\  and  the  third  was  the  ancestor  of  the  Zamindars 
of  Madhubani  in  Darbhanga.  Dalip  Singh's  son  and  successor,  Raja  Dhrup 
Singh,  received  a.  firman  from  the  Emperor  Farrukhsiyar.  In  1760  he  was 
summoned  to  help  the  Emperor  Shah  Alam  in  his  expedition  to  Bengal ;  and 
subsequently,  to  escape  the  exactions  of  the  Nawab  Mir  Kasim  of  Patna,  he 
poisoned  himself,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  daughter's  son,  Raja  Jugalkishor 
Singh.  The  latter,  after  many  vicissitudes  of  fortune,  seems  to  have  been 


68  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

recognised  by  the  British  Government ;  and  his  grandson,  Raja  Anandakishor, 
received  the  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur,  with  a  khilat,  as  a  personal  distinction 
from  Lord  William  Bentinck  for  good  services  rendered  during  the  Nepalese 
war.  He  was  followed  by  his  brother  and  his  nephew  successively ;  and  the 
latter,  the  Maharaja  Rajendrakishor  Singh,  who  succeeded  in  1855,  rendered 
good  service  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny,  and  also  during  the  great  famine.  He 
was  succeeded  in  1883  by  his  only  son,  the  present  head  of  the  family,  who 
was  appointed  a  Member  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  Bengal  in  January 
1891.  The  Maharaja  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  28th  June  1888. 
Residence. — Bettiah,  Champdran,  Bengal. 


BEYPORB,  Valiya  Rdjd  of.     See  Rama  Varma  Raja,  Rdjd. 

BEZANJI  SOHRABJI,  Khan  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  August  1881. 
Residence. — B  ombay. 

BHABAR,  The  Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  area  of  the  State  is  80  square  miles;  its  population  is  7222. 
Residence. — Bhabar,  Pdlanpur,  Bombay. 


BHADARVA,  RANA  PATEH  SINGH  SARDAR  SINGH,  Rand  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1850  ;  succeeded  to  \hzgadi  26th  January  1888.     The  area 
of  the  State  is  27  square  miles;  its  population  9185. 
Residence. — Bhadarva,  Rewa"  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 


BHADAUR.     See  Atar  Singh,  Sardar,  Sir,  K.C.I.E. 


BHADAURA  (GUN A),  RAJA  MADHO  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Raja  is  descended  from  a  Sisodhiya  Rajput  (Hindu)  family;  was  born 
in  the  year  1876,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  loth  May  1883.  The 
State  has  a  population  of  about  4000,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bhadaura,  Guna,  Central  India. 


BHADAWAR,  Mahdrdid  of.     See  Mahendra  Mahendra  Singh. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  69 


BHADVA,  JARBJA  BHAV  SINGH  JI,  Chief  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1826  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1843.    The  area  of  the  State 
is  7  square  miles;  its  population  1231,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Bhadva,  Ka'thia'war,  Bombay. 

BHAG  RAM,  PANDIT  (of  Jalandhar),  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  nth  August  1885. 
Residence. — Kashmir. 

BHAG  SINGH  (of  Sikandra),  Sarddr. 

Descended  from  Dargaha  Singh,  who  acquired  a  considerable  territory  by 
conquest  in  1759  A.D.  His  possessions  were  subsequently  reduced  by  other 
Sikh  Sardars.  He  had  four  sons,  of  whom  the  third,  Sardar  Agar  Singh, 
was  the  father  of  Sardar  Bhag  Singh.  The  Sardar  has  a  son,  named  Jowahir 
Singh.  The  title  is  hereditary. 

Residence. — Ambala,  Punjab. 

BHAGAT  SINGH,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

Born  1846.  The  title  is  personal;  and  was  conferred  on  i9th  April 
1886,  in  recognition  of  eminent  services  in  the  Department  of  Public  Works, 
Rajputana.  Claims  descent  from  an  ancient  Kshatriya  family  of  Sikh 
Sardars,  of  the  "  Party  of  Raja  Sahibsingh,"  settled  in  the  district  of  Gujrat, 
Punjab.  The  Sardar  Bahadur  has  four  sons  living — Sardar  Krishna  Singh 
Kapur  (barrister-at-law  of  the  Middle  Temple,  1887),  Lahore  ;  Sardar  Vishnu 
Singh  Kapur  (of  the  Royal  Agricultural  College,  Cirencester,  and  of  the 
Middle  Temple) ;  Govind  Singh  ;  Hari  Singh. 

Residence. — Kapur  Mahil,  Gujrat,  Punjab. 

BHAGAT  SINGH  (of  Kapurthala),  Sarddr,  CJ.E. 

The  Sardar  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire,  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Kapurth  ala. 

BHAGWAN  BAKHSH  (of  Pokhra  Ansari),  Rdjd. 

Born  ist  September  1872.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  recognised 
as  such,  4th  December  1877,  when  the  Raja  succeeded  his  father,  Raja 
Umrao  Singh,  as  a  minor.  The  family  is  a  younger  branch  of  the  Amethia 
Chattris  (see  Rameshwar  Bakhsh  Singh,  Raja  of  Amethi),  descended  from 
Prithvi  Chand,  Raja  of  Kalinjar.  His  descendant,  Jamdhor  Singh,  had 
three  sons,  of  whom  the  third  was  Ram  Singh,  who,  on  the  division  of  the 
estates,  took  Pokhra  Ansari,  with  the  title  of  Rao.  It  is  said  that  his  great- 
grandson,  Rao  Kalian  Singh,  saluted  a  celebrated  fakir  with  the  respectful 


70  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

address  of  Bandagi  Mian,  and  the  grateful  saint  responded  with  a  blessing  on 
the  "  Raja,"  whence  the  title  was  ever  afterwards  borne  by  this  branch,  who 
are  known  as  the  "Bandagi  Mian  Amethias."  A  descendant,  Rao  Amar 
Singh,  endeavoured  to  assert  his  independence  in  the  time  of  Shuja-ud-daula, 
after  the  latter  had  been  defeated  by  the  English ;  but  he  was  subsequently 
defeated  and  slain  by  the  Nawab's  forces.  His  son,  Madho  Singh, 
ultimately  regained  most  of  his  possessions.  After  his  death,  the  property 
saw  many  changes,  and  at  last  fell  into  the  hands  of  Raja  Sahajram 
Bakhsh.  He  was  followed  by  Raja  Umrao  Singh,  the  father  of  the  present 
Raja. 

Residence. — Rowni,  Haidargarh,  Bara  Banki,  Oudh. 


BHAGWAN  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2Qth  May  1886. 
Residence. — Rangoon,  Burma. 

BHAGWAN  SINGH,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

Born  1834.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  whose  founder,  Sardar  Ram  Singh, 
acquired  the  territory  of  Buner  and  other  districts  in  1751  A.D.  The  family 
appear  to  have  done  good  service  during  the  Gurkha  Campaign,  the  first 
Sikh  war,  and  lastly  during  the  Mutiny  in  1857.  For  the  latter  service 
they  received  as  a  reward  the  remission  of  a  year's  commutation  tax,  and 
one-sixteenth  of  the  whole  has  been  excused  in  perpetuity.  The  Sardar 
Bhagwan  Singh,  whose  title  of  Sardar  is  hereditary,  is  an  Honorary 
Magistrate  in  the  Ambala  district;  and  on  ist  January  1890  received  the 
title  of  Sardar  Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction.  His  son  is  named 
Brijandar  Singh. 

Residence. — Sohana  Bedwan,  Ambala,  Punjab. 

BHAGWANT  D AYAL,  THAKURAI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd 
January  1893.  The  present  Thakurai,  who  has  done  good  service  on 
several  occasions,  received  the  thanks  of  Government  for  his  measures 
of  famine  relief.  He  claims  descent  from  Raja  Dushasan  Singh  of 
Dadand,  of  a  very  old  Rajput  family  in  Rajputana.  One  of  his  ancestors 
took  service  under  Raja  Mansingh,  Raja  of  Palamau,  whose  throne  after- 
wards he  contrived  to  seize.  Thakurai  Ramban  Singh,  an  ancestor  of  the 
present  Thakurai,  rendered  good  service  when  the  English  first  took  Palamau  ; 
and  Thakurai  Chhatardhari  Singh,  great-grandfather  of  the  present  Thakurai, 
obtained  from  Government  many  rewards,  including  a  jdgir,  the  title  of  Rai 
Bahadur,  a  khilat  and  sarpech,  etc.,  for  his  services  at  the  time  of  the  Kol 
rebellion.  The  father  also  of  the  present  Thakurai  did  good  service  at  the 
time  of  the  famine  in  1873,  and  received  a  sanad  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage 
at  Delhi  in  1877. 

Residence. — Chainpur,  Pa"la~mau,  Lohdrdaga,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  71 


BHAGWAT  MAHANTI,  Rat  Bahadur. 

Born  3rd  March  1821 ;  son  of  Jugal  Mahanti,  belonging  to  a  family  of 
Karan  or  Utkal  Kayasthas.  Entered  the  service  of  the  Government  of 
Bengal  in  the  year  1839,  and  served  for  more  than  fifty  years  in  a  large 
number  of  offices  with  ability  and  fidelity,  retiring  on  pension  in  1891.  In 
1870  he  received  a  gold  watch  and  chain  from  the  Bengal  Government,  in 
recognition  of  "  his  long  and  valuable  services,"  as  well  as  in  consideration  of 
"his  successful  exertions  during  the  famine  of  1866  " ;  and  in  1886  the  title 
of  Rai  Bahadur  was  conferred  upon  him  as  a  personal  distinction.  The  Rai 
Bahadur  has  seven  sons  —  Ramkrishna  Mahanti,  Jaikrishna  Mahanti, 
Bhuvaneshwar  Mahanti,  Nandakishor  Mahanti,  Govindacharan  Mahanti, 
Paramanand  Mahanti,  and  Sadanand  Mahanti. 

Residence. — Pompalo,  Kothdesh,  Puri,  Orissa. 


BHAIRON  SINGH  (of  Maslai),  Rao. 

Born  22nd  March  1855.  The  title  is  hereditary;  and  is  said  to  have 
been  originally  received  from  Gori  Shah,  Badshah.  In  1820  the  then  Rao 
received  a  sanad  from  Sir  John  Malcolm.  The  Rao  has  a  son,  named 
Omar  Singh. 

Residence. — Nimdr,  Central  Provinces. 


BHAISAKHO,  Bhumia  of.     See  Ghari. 

BHAISAUNDA  (Bundelkhand),  CHAUBE  CHHATARSAL 
PRASAD,  Jdgirddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Jagirdar  is  of  a  Chaube  Brahman  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from 
Ram  Krishna  Chaube,  Killadar  of  Kalinjar  (see  Paldeo),  and  was  born  about 
the  year  1878.  He  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  i6th  January  1886.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  12  square  miles ;  its  population  over  4000,  chiefly 
Hindus.  The  Jagirdar's  great-grandfather,  Newal  Kisor,  was  third  son  of 
Ram  Krishna  Chaube,  referred  to  above ;  and  received  a  sanad  from  the 
British  Government.  The  Jagirdar  maintains  a  force  of  52  soldiers. 

Residence. — Bhaisaunda,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

BHAISOLA  or  DOTRIA  (BHOPAWAR),  THAKUR  BHIM 

SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family  ;  and  was  born 
about  the  year  1821.  Succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  the  year  1842.  The 
population  of  the  State  is  nearly  3000. 

Residence. — Bhaisola,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 


72  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BHAJJI,  RANA  DURGA  SINGH,  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1842;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  i8th  November  1875. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  family,  whose  founder  in  early  times  came  from  Kangra, 
and  acquired  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  by 
conquest.  It  was  overrun  by  the  Gurkhas  between  1803  and  1815;  and 
after  their  expulsion  was  confirmed  in  the  possession  of  the  Rana  by  a  sanad 
from  the  British  Government,  dated  4th  September  1815.  Its  area  is  94 
square  miles;  population  12,106,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Chief  maintains  a 
military  force  of  60  infantry  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Bhajji,  Punjab. 


BHALUSNA,  THAKUR  MULSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1852  ;  is  descended  from  a  Koli  (Hindu)  family. 
Residence. — Bhalusna,  Mahi  Kantha,  Bombay. 

BHAMBO  KHAN,  Jam. 

Born  1835.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  on 
the  Jam's  ancestor,  Saispal,  when  converted  to  Muhammadanism  by  Sayyid 
Jalal-ud-din.  The  Jam  has  two  sons — Khan  Muhammad  Alam  Khan  and 
Gulam  Ali  Khan  ;  they  bear  the  titles  of  Mian  and  Khan  respectively.  The 
Jam  is  a  considerable  Jagirdar  in  the  district  of  Shikarpur. 

Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

BHAN  PARTAB  (of  Imjhira),  Rdjd  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  hereditary;  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  July  1858  on  Raja 
Surat  Singh  Bahadur  (cousin  of  the  present  Raja),  who  was  conspicuous  for 
his  loyalty,  and  for  the  brave  resistance  he  and  his  followers  offered  to  the 
rebels,  in  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  Belongs  to  a  Lodhi  family,  whose  ancestors 
had  in  early  times  the  title  of  Thakur,  and  have  been  settled  in  the 
Narsinghpur  district  from  time  immemorial.  In  1835  the  title  of  Rao  was 
conferred  on  Surat  Singh  (afterwards  Raja  Bahadur)  by  the  Raja  of  Delehri. 
When  Raja  Surat  Singh  died  in  1870,  the  succession  of  his  uncle,  Raja 
Manbodh  Singh  Bahadur,  was  recognised  by  the  Government.  He  was 
appointed  an  Honorary  Magistrate ;  and  on  his  death  was  succeeded  by  his 
only  son,  the  present  Raja  Bahadur. 

Residence. — Narsinghpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BHAO  MUNSARAM,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893,  for  eminent 
services  in  municipal  work.     Is  a  Commissioner  of  the  Poona  Municipality. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  73 


BHAO  SINGH  (of  Piparia),   Thdkur. 

Bom  1858.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Thakur  succeeded  his  father, 
Thakur  Bhagwan  Singh. 

Residence. — Piparia,  Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BHABADPURA  (BHOPAWAR),  BHUMIA  UDAI  SINGH, 

Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Chief  is  a  Bhilala,  born  about  1848  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi'vn.  1858. 
The  population  of  the  State  is  1724,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bharadpura,  Bhopawar,  Central  India. 

BHARAT  SINGH,  Manki. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  never  to  have  been  formally  recog- 
nised by  the  Government.  The  Manki  has  a  son  named  Jagannath  Singh, 
who  bears  the  title  of  Babu. 

Residence. — M  a"  nbhum,  B  engal. 

BHARTPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  BIRJINDAR 
SAWAI  SIR  JASWANT  SINGH  BAHADUR,  BAHADUR 
JANG,  G.C.S.I.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1851  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1853  :  invested  with  full 
powers  4th  March  1871.  Is  of  a  Jat  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Bal- 
chand,  who  founded  the  Bhartpur  State  about  the  beginning  of  the  i8th 
century.  The  fifteenth  in  descent  from  Balchand  was  the  Maharaja  Brig 
Singh,  and  seven  generations  further  comes  His  Highness  the  present  Maha- 
raja. The  banner  of  this  Chief  is  coloured  red ;  its  motto  is,  Sri  Lachmanji 
Sahai.  His  son  is  the  Kunwarji  Ram  Singh  Bahadur.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  about  1974  square  miles;  its  population  645,540,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  with  105,666  Muhammadans  and  4499  Jains.  His  Highness  maintains 
a  military  force  of  1647  cavalry,  8207  infantry,  and  54  guns.  He  is  entitled 
to  a  salute  of  15  guns,  and  2  guns  more  as  a  personal  distinction. 

Residence. — Bhartpur,  Rajputana. 

BHASKARA,  Rdjd.     See  Ramnad. 

BHATKHBRI,  RAWAT  SHBO  SINGH,  Rdwat  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Rawat  is  a  Chandrawat  Rajput  (Hindu),  born  about  the  year  1842  ; 
succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1861.  The  population  of  the  State  is  2234,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Bhatkheri,  Western  Mdlwa",  Central  India. 


74 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BHAUNAGAR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  SIR  TAKHT- 

SINGHJI  JASWATSINGHJI,  G.C.S.I.,  Maharaja  of. 

A.  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  6th  January  1858  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi on  the  death  of  his  father, 
Jaswatsinghji,  K.C.S.I.,  in  April  1870.  Educated  first  at  Bhaunagar,  he  was 

one  of  the  first  Princes  who  joined 
the  Keatinge  Rajkumar  College  at 
Rajkot,  where  he  studied  for  three 
years,  and  was  distinguished  for  his 
diligence  and  docile  and  amiable 
disposition — a  favourite  with  both 
schoolfellows  and  masters.  On 
leaving  the  Rajkumar  College  in 
1874  his  studies  were  continued 
under  a  specially  selected  tutor, 
Captain  (now  Colonel)  H.  L.  Nutt, 
of  the  Bombay  Staff  Corps.  During 
his  minority  the  State  was  jointly 
administered  by  an  European  officer 
of  Government  associated  with  a 
native  Minister  of  State ;  but  in 
March  1877  His  Highness  took  the  place  of  the  native  Minister,  and 
so  continued  until  within  nine  months  of  attaining  his  majority,  when 
(5th  April  1878)  he  was  placed  in  sole  charge.  On  the  24th  May  1881 
Her  Majesty  the  Empress  of  India  conferred  the  honour  of  a  Knight 
Commander  of  the  Star  of  India  on  His  Highness,  in  which  exalted  Order 
he  was  advanced  to  Grand  Commander  on  the  ist  January  1886;  and  His 
Excellency  the  Viceroy  five  years  later  conferred  as  a  personal  distinction 
the  high  title  of  Maharaja.  His  Highness  has  married  six  wives,  five  of 
whom  are  alive — their  Highnesses  Rani  Shri  Nahniba,  Rani  Shri  Hariba, 
and  Rani  Shri  Bajirajba,  married  1874;  Rani  Shri  Bairajba,  married  1879; 
and  Rani  Shri  Keserba,  married  1888,  and  has  issue.  His  sons  are — 

Kuma"r  Shri  Bhausinghji,  born  26th  April  1875. 
Kuma"r  Shri  Mangalsinghji,  born  3rd  June  1881. 

His  Highness's  daughters  are — 

Kumdri  Shri  Ra'mbcl. 
Kumari  Shri  Kesa'ba'. 
Kumdri  Shri  Rupaliba*. 

Any  account  of  the  predecessors  of  His  Highness  would  cover  the  history 
of  the  illustrious  tribe  or  clan  of  the  Gohel  Rajputs  of  Ka'thia'wa'r,  of  whom  he  is 
the  Chief,  and  after  whom  the  eastern  part  of  the  province  of  Ka'thia'wa'r  is  called 
Gohelwad.  The  Gohels  claim  to  be  descended  from  the  celebrated  Pa"ndavs, 
who  belonged  to  the  lunar  or  Chandravansi  race,  and  so  trace  their  line  from  the 
celebrated  Shalivahan,  the  founder  of  the  Shaka  era,  while  Colonel  Tod  and 
others  assert  that  the  Gohels  belong  to  the  Solar  race.  The  old  family  title  of 
"Ra"wal"  was  earned  (as  appears  at  page  258  of  Tod's  Western  India)  at  the 
memorable  battle  of  Chitor,  fought  with  Ald-ud-din  Khilji  in  1303  A.D.  There 
are  evidences  going  as  far  back  as  812  A.D.  which  show  that  the  Gohels  ruled  in 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  75 

Saurashtra  (Kdthia'wdr)  from  a  very  remote  period.  On  the  fall  of  the  Delhi 
Empire,  when  the  Mahratta  power  gradually  rose  into  importance,  the  capital  of 
the  State  was  at  Sihor,  with  Bhausingji  as  ruler,  at  which  time  (1722-23  A.D.)  an 
encounter  with  the  Mahratta  army  took  place  near  Sihor,  and  resulted  in  the 
defeat  of  the  Mahrattas.  The  struggle  showed  the  weakness  of  the  position  of 
the  capital,  and  Bhausingji  chose  the  present  site  and  founded  the  city  of  Bhau- 
nagar,  which  he  considered  more  secure.  He  died  in  1764  A.D.,  and  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  son  Akherajji.  Akherajji  assisted  the  Mahrattas  against  the 
Mughal  Viceroy  Mominkhan,  and  in  1771  assisted  the  British  Government  in  re- 
ducing the  pirate  stronghold  of  Talaji.  It  was  this  ruler,  too,  who,  at  the  request 
of  the  Resident  at  Baroda,  gave  shelter  to  Raghundth  Rao  Peshwa",  then  a 
refugee,  sending  him  to  Bombay  in  one  of  his  own  vessels.  Akherajji  died  in 
1772,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Wakhatsinghji.  Wakhatsinghji  largely  ex- 
tended his  dominions,  was  a  wise  ruler  and  intrepid  soldier,  and  during  his  life- 
time cultivated  the  friendship  of  the  British  then  trading  in  Surat.  He  died  in 
1 8 1 6,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Wajesinghji,  who  after  a  prosperous  reign, 
extending  over  a  period  of  thirty-six  years,  died  in  1852,  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  grandson  Akherajji  III.,  his  son  Bhausingji  having  died  during  his  lifetime. 
Akherajji  III.  died  in  1854,  and  having  no  male  issue  was  succeeded  by  his 
brother  Jaswatsinghji,  who  died  in  1870,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son 
Takhtsinghji,  the  present  ruler.  The  latter  has  effected  great  and  rapid  improve- 
ments in  his  dominions.  Liberal  in  his  charities,  generous  in  his  grants  for  the 
public  good,  he  has  constructed  over  120  miles  of  railway  at  an  expense  of  over 
eighty  lacs  of  rupees,  intersected  his  State  with  roads,  studded  the  country  with 
important  public  works,  beautified  his  capital  with  permanent  buildings  of  a  most 
ornamental  character,  instituted  a  State  Council,  and  revised  the  State  laws,  civil 
and  criminal.  At  his  capital  he  has  from  time  to  time  received  special  visits 
from  their  Excellencies  the  Governors  of  Bombay  ;  and  in  1 890  was  honoured  by 
a  visit  of  His  Royal  Highness  the  late  Duke  of  Clarence  and  Avondale,  who, 
journeying  to  a  new  port  founded  by  His  Highness  in  the  South  Coast,  and  now 
known  as  Port  Albert  Victor,  there  laid  the  foundation-stone  of  the  new  harbour 
works.  His  loyalty  to  the  British  Crown  is  second  to  none  in  India,  and  he  has 
recently,  at  a  cost  of  over  five  lacs  of  rupees,  formed  for  Imperial  service  a  regi- 
ment of  Lancers — 350  strong — of  men  chiefly  of  his  own  clan,  of  which  corps  he 
is  Honorary  Colonel. 

The  area  of  his  State  is  2860  square  miles ;  the  population  464,671,  and 
the  annual  gross  revenue  Rs.4 1,00,000. 

Arms. — Gules,  an  eagle  or  displayed  ;  in  chief  on  a  canton  of  the  second,  a 
lion  statant  of  the  first.  Crest. — An  Eastern  galley  argent  profile  in  full  sail. 
Supporters. — Two  bulls  argent  rampant,  service  with  bezant.  Motto. — 
JS^TEI  sji^f  i^sgnC  wm  ("  Man  proposes  but  God  disposes  ")  on  a  label  azure. 

Residence. — The  Motibagh  Palace,  Bhaunagar.  Club. — The  Indian  North- 
brook,  3  Whitehall  Gardens,  London. 


76  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BHAWAL,  RAM  SINGH,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1864,  succeeded  to  the  gadi  25th  September  1889.  The 
Seim  is  a  Khasi,  and  his  State  is  situated  in  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hills.  Its 
population  is  about  555,  chiefly  Khasis  and  Christians. 

Residence. — Bhawal,  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hills,  Assam. 

BHAWANI  GHULAM  PAL  (of  Mahuli),  Rdjd. 

Born  1844.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Raja  being  a  Surajbans  Rajput, 
descended  from  the  family  of  Alakdeo  and  Tilakdeo,  who  killed  Kaulbil  the 
Rajbhar  about  the  year  1580,  and  seized  his  domains  situated  in  the  Pargana 
of  Mahuli,  Basti  district.  Subsequently  the  family  obtained  the  title  of  Pal 
from  the  Emperor  of  Delhi.  The  Raja  has  a  son  named  Lai  Narendra 
Bahadur  Pal. 

Residence. — Mahson,  Basti,  North-Western  Provinces. 

BHAWANI  PRIYA  BARNANI  (of  Gauripur),  Rani. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Godlpdra,  Assam. 

BHIKAM  NARAYAN  SINGH  (of  Deo),  Rdjd  Bahadur. 

See  Deo. 

BHIKAN  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1 22 1,  Fasli  era.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist 
January  1877,  for  eminent  services  during  the  famine  of  1873-74.  Has  a 
son,  named  Golam  Dastgir  Khan. 

Residence. — Muzaffarpur,  Bengal. 


BHIKHAJI  AMUT  CHAUBB,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   ist  June  1888  for  eminent 
services  in  the  Medical  Department 
Residence. — Baroda,  Bombay. 

BHIMACHARYA  BIN  RAMBHAT  LALKIKAR, 

Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888,  for 
eminent  scholarship  and  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in 
Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — B  ombay . 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  77 


BHINGA,  Rdjd  of.     See  Udai  Partab  Singh. 

BHOJAKHERI,  RAO  BHAWANI  SINGH,  Rao  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Rao  is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  and  was  born 
about  the  year  1858  \  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  9th  December  1879. 
The  population  of  his  State  is  about  250,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bhojakheri,  Western  MaTwa",  Central  India. 

BHOLA  RAM,  Rai  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — 

BHOLANATH  BISWAS,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BHOPAL,  HER  HIGHNESS  NAWAB  SHAH  JAHAN 

BEGUM,  G.C.S.L,  O.I.,  Begum  of. 

A  Ruling  Princess. 

Her  Highness  the  Nawab  Shah  Jahan  Begum  is  the  seventh  in  lineal 
descent  from  the  famous  Dost  Muhammad  Khan,  founder  of  the  Bhopal 

dynasty;  was  born  3rd  July  1838,  and 
succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  1 6th  November 
1868.  Dost  Muhammad  was  an  Afghan 
officer  in  the  service  of  Aurangzeb,  who  took 
advantage  of  the  weakness  of  the  Mughals 
after  the  death  of  that  Emperor  to  establish 
his  independent  authority  in  Bhopal  and  the 
neighbouring  districts.  The  State  of  Bhopal 
has  usually  been  on  the  friendliest  terms 
with  the  British  authorities.  In  1778,  on 
the  occasion  of  General  Goddard's  march 
across  India;  in  1809,  at  the  time  of  General 
Close's  expedition ;  and  again  in  1817,  at  the 
commencement  of  the  Pindari  war,  Bhopal 
did  good  service  to  the  British  Power.  An 
interesting  feature  in  Bhopal  history  has  been 
the  fact  that  the  Princesses  of  the  ruling  family  have  verp  frequently 
taken  the  most  prominent  part  in  the  administration  of  the  State. 
Kudsia  Begum  was  succeeded  in  1837  by  her  son-in-law,  the  Nawab 
Jahangir  Muhammad;  and  the  latter,  on  his  death  in  1844,  was  succeeded 
by  his  widow,  Her  late  Highness  Sikandar  Begum,  mother  of  the  ruling 
Princess,  who  was  succeeded  by  the  latter  in  1868.  The  first  husband 
of  Her  Highness  the  Nawab  Shah  Jahan  Begum  died  in  1867,  leaving  one 
daughter,  the  Nawab  Sultan  Jahan  Begum ;  the  latter  has  been  acknowledged 
as  Her  Highness's  heir-apparent.  Her  Highness  was  created  in  1872,  in 
recognition  of  her  high  administrative  qualities,  a  Grand  Commander  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India;  and  has  subsequently  been 
appointed  by  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Empress  to  the  Order  of  the 
Crown  of  India.  In  1871  she  contracted  a  second  marriage  with  the 
Maulavi  Muhammad  Sadik  Husain,  Nawab  Consort,  a  descendant  of  a  noble 
family  of  Bokhara.  The  heir-apparent,  the  Nawab  Sultan  Jahan  Begum,  was 
married  in  1874  to  Ahmad  Ali  Khan,  a  member  of  the  Afghan  clan,  the 
Mirazai  Khel,  from  which  the  Bhopal  family  is  descended. 

The  area  of  the  State  is  6872  square  miles  ;  its  population  is  nearly  a 
million,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  over  80,000  Muhammadans,  6000 
Jains,  and  about  120,000  belonging  to  aboriginal  tribes.  Her  Highness  the 
Nawab  Begum  maintains  a  military  force  of  803  cavalry,  2030  infantry,  and 
69  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  19  guns,  with  2  guns  more  within 
the  limits  of  the  Bhopal  territory. 

Arms. — Vert,  a  tower  or  within  twelve  musk  blossoms  proper  in  bordure. 
Crest. — A  sheaf  of  arrows  charged  with  a  lily  argent.  Supporters. — Mahsir 
(fish),  proper.  Motto. — Nasr  Minullah. 

Residence. — Bhopal,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  79 


BHOPAL  SINGH  (of  Urni  Piparia),  Thakur. 

Born  1827.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  derived  from 
the  Gond  Rajas  of  Mandla.  Is  descended  from  a  Rajput  family  of  the 
Kshatriya  tribe,  clan  Chandra -Bansi-Tomar  (or  Tomar  of  the  Lunar  race). 
This  family  claims  to  be  descended  from  Raja  Anang  Pal,  who  reigned  at 
Delhi  in  1193  A.D.  After  the  subversion  of  the  Tomar  dynasty,  the  family 
is  said  to  have  migrated  to  the  Gwalior  and  Jhansi  territories,  where  some  of 
its  branches  remain.  Two  brothers  of  this  family,  Bisram  Singh  and  Narwar 
Singh,  were  called  in  by  the  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla,  and  provided  with  military 
appointments.  They  captured  the  fort  of  Ajaigarh  and  subdued  the  country 
round  Mandla  and  Kurai ;  and  were  rewarded  with  the  tdluka  Sainkhera. 
In  1842  the  Thakur  Bhopal  Singh,  with  his  father  and  brother,  captured  a 
rebel,  and  were  rewarded  by  Government  with  the  village  of  Pat  Ras. 
Rendered  good  service  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny,  and  was  rewarded  with 
a  money  grant  and  a  parwdna.  In  1867  the  Thakur  was  made  an  Honorary 
Magistrate. 

Residence. — Piparia,  Narsinghpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BHOR,  SANKAR  RAO  CHIMNAJI,  Pant  Sachiv  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1854.  Succeeded  to  the  gadi  i2th  February  1871.  Is  a  Brahman 
(Hindu) ;  the  Pant  Sachiv  was  one  of  the  eight  hereditary  Ministers  of  the 
old  Mahratta*  Empire.  The  present  Pant  Sachiv  is  the  natural  heir  of 
Chimnaji  Pandit,  the  late  Pant  Sachiv ;  who  was  adopted  by  Raghunathrao 
on  payment  of  nazars  to  the  Raja  of  Satara  and  to  the  British  Government. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  1491  square  miles,  and  its  population  145,876, 
chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bhor,  Poona,  Bombay. 

BHOTE  KHAN  LALKHAN,  Khan  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — KMmgaon,  Berar. 

BHUBAN  MOHAN,  Kumar. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  i8th  July  1861.  The  Kumar  is 
the  son  and  successor  of  the  late  Raja  Haris  Chandra,  who  was  the  Chief  of 
the  Chakma  clan  in  the  Chittagong  Hill  Tracts,  and  who  rendered  good 
service  in  the  Lushai  Expedition  of  1871-72,  by  supplying  coolies,  boats,  etc. 

Residence. — Chittagong  Hill  Tracts,  Bengal. 

BHUGANGA  BHUSAN  RAI,  Rdjd  Rai. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  never  to  have  been  formally  recog- 
nised by  Government.  It  was  conferred  by  the  Emperor  of  Delhi  for 
approved  service,  the  earliest  Rajas  being  Raja  Pratapaditya  Rai  and  Raid 
Basanta  Kumar  Rai. 

Residence. — Khulna,  Bengal. 


8o  •        THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BHUP  INDRA  BAHADUR  SINGH  (of  Kantit),  Rdjd. 
See  Kantit. 

BHUP  INDRA  BIKRAMA  SINGH  (of  Piyagpur),  Rdjd. 
See  Piyagpur. 

BHUP  SINGH,  Rao. 

Born  1851.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  descended  from  Dalip  Singh, 
Bais  Thakur;  who,  300  years  ago,  came  at  the  head  of  his  tribe,  and 
took  possession  of  the  Pargana  of  Kot  Salbahan.  Dalip  Singh  had  two 
sons,  Rao  Singh  and  Karam  Singh ;  and  the  descendants  of  Rao  Singh,  one 
of  whom  was  Baldeo  Singh,  father  of  Bhup  Singh,  have  always  borne  the 
title  of  Rao.  Rao  Baldeo  Singh  did  excellent  service  in  the  time  of  the 
Mutiny,  and  received  a  commendatory  parwdna  in  reward.  He  also 
received  a  Certificate  of  Honour  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi  in 
1877;  and  was  appointed  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Bhanpur,  Budaon,  North- Western  Provinces. 

BHUP  SINGH,  BAGGA  (of  Dabanwala),  Sarddr. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  the  Bagga  (Jat)  family, 
formerly  of  great  wealth  and  power  in  the  Gurdaspur  district,  Descended 
from  Sardar  Amar  Singh,  who  overran  the  greater  part  of  the  district.  His 
son  and  successor,  Sardar  Bhag  Singh,  survived  his  father  only  three  years ; 
and  on  his  death  his  cousin  Budh  Singh  took  possession  of  the  estates,  to 
the  exclusion  of  Bhag  Singh's  son,  Hari  Singh.  But  Budh  Singh  was 
deprived  of  his  possessions  by  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh.  Subsequently 
the  Lahore  Darbar  assigned  a  jdgir  to  Hari  Singh,  who  was  the  father  of  the 
present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Gurddspur,  Punjab. 

BHUPBNDRA  NARAYAN  RAI  (of  Madhavapassa),  Rdjd. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  not  to  have  been  formally  recognised 
by  Government.  The  family  at  one  time  possessed  three  farmdns  of  the 
time  of  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah,  bearing  the  seal  of  the  Nawab 
Murshid  Kuli  Khan,  confirming  Udai  Narayan  Rai  in  the  Zaminddri  of 
Chandradip,  Bakarganj. 

Residence. — Madhavapassa,  Bdkarganj,  Bengal. 

BHUPBNDRADEB  RAI,  Rdjd  Rai  and  Mahdsai. 

This  is  a  title  that  appears  not  to  have  been  formally  recognised  by 
Government.  The  family  claims  to  have  received  it  from  the  Emperor 
Aurangzeb  in  the  year  1090  Hijrah ;  and  states  that  the  original  sanad  was 
in  their  possession  up  to  the  time  of  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi, 
in  1877. 

Residence. — Bansberia",  Hooghly,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  81 


BHUTAN,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SANGAY  DORJI,  Deb  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

His  Highness  the  Deb  Raja  is  a  Buddhist  by  religion,  and  a  Thibetan 
by  race.  He  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  23rd  August  1885.  The  area  of 
the  State  is  about  20,000  square  miles;  its  population  is  estimated  at 
200,000,  chiefly  Buddhists. 

Residence. — Bhutan. 

BHUTNATH  DE,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Raipur,  Central  Provinces. 

BHUVAN  MOHAN  VIDYARATNA,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the 
Empress.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular 
Rajas,  and  was  given  for  eminent  oriental  learning,  especially  in  Sanskrit. 
Is  a  professor  in  the  Nadiya  tols,  the  ancient  Sanskrit  University  of 
Bengal. 

Residence.— Nadiy£,  Bengal. 

BHYSONDA.     See  Bhaisaunda. 

BICHHROD  I.,  THAKUR  RATAN  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family ;  was  born 
about  the  year  1860,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  iyth  April  1874.  The 
population  of  his  State  is  about  366,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bichhrod,  Western  Malwa,  Central  India. 

BICHHROD  II.,  THAKUR  MADHO  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family ;  was  born  about 
the  year  1847,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1878. 
Residence. — Bichhrod,  Western  Malwa",  Central  India. 

BIHARI  LAL  KHAZANCHI,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Jh.^    Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


it 


82  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BIHAT,  RAO  MAHUM  SINGH,  Jdgirddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Rao  is  descended  from  an  ancient  Bundela  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  a 
collateral  branch  of  that  which  rules  at  Orchha.  He  was  born  on  i6th 
November  1858,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  9th  April  1872.  Arjun 
Pal,  who  ruled  at  Mahoni,  was  the  common  ancestor  of  the  Orchha  and  Bihat 
families — his  third  son,  Dya  Pal,  settling  at  Etaura,  and  subsequent  genera- 
tions occupying  Gurha  in  Bihat  State,  and  finally  Bihat  itself.  Aperbal  Singh, 
Chief  of  Bihat,  obtained  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1807. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  about  13  square  miles;  its  population  4704,  chiefly 
Hindus.  The  Rao  maintains  a  military  force  of  5  cavalry,  75  infantry,  and 
i  gun. 

Residence. — Bihat,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

BIHORA,  THAKUR  SARDARBAWA,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1854.  Area  of  State  is  rather  under  i  square  mile;  its  popula- 
tion is  chiefly  Bhil  (aboriginal).  The  Thakur  belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Muham- 
madan)  family. 

Residence. — Bihora,  Rewd  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

BIJA,  THAKUR  UDB  CHAND,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1829.  Succeeded  to  the  gadi  1841.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  family 
(Hindu),  whose  founder,  Garab  Chand,  came  from  Ujjain  in  early  times  and 
conquered  this  territory.  It  was  overrun  by  the  Gurkhas  between  1803  and 
1815  ;  but  when  they  were  expelled  by  the  British  in  the  latter  year,  the 
Thakur  was  confirmed  in  possession  by  a  sanad,  on  conditions  of  feudal 
service.  The  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  has  an  area  of 
4  square  miles,  and  a  population  of  1158,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Thakur 
maintains  a  military  force  of  10  men. 

Residence. — Bija,  Punjab. 

BIJAI  BAHADUR  (of  Chichli),  Rdjd. 

Born  1849.  Succeeded  his  father,  Raja  Nizam  Singh,  in  1871.  The 
title  is  hereditary  ;  and  was  originally  conferred  by  the  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla, 
dating  so  far  back,  it  is  said,  as  921  A.D.  The  sanad  has  been  destroyed  by 
age.  In  1808  a  flag,  a,  staff,  a  belt,  and  a  drum  were  bestowed  on  Raja 
Sangram  Shah  by  the  late  Nawab  Sidak  Ali,  Subahdar  of  the  Nagpur  Raja, 
for  the  capture  of  a  famous  rebel  named  Mir  Khan.  The  family  were  settled 
at  Fatehpur  in  Hoshangabad  until  1227;  when  Pahar  Singh,  the  younger 
son  of  Raja  Bariya  Singh  of  Fatehpur,  came  to  Chichli  and  Sangal.  The 
present  Raja's  father,  Raja  Nizam  Singh,  rendered  good  service  to  Govern- 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA         o  83 

ment  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  in  1857;  and  received,  in  consideration 
thereof,  a  sanad  si  loyalty,  dated  igth  September  1859,  together  with  a  sword 
of  honour  and  a  money  grant.  He  was  also  made  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 
The  Raja  Bijai  Bahadur  has  a  son  whose  name  is  Lai  Saheb.  The  family 
banner  is  a  yellow  flag  or  pitambar,  with  chauri  and  staff ;  the  motto  on  the 
Raja's  seal  is  Sado  Sahai  Narsingh,  Nizam  Singh  Sut  Bijai  Bahadur  Singh, 
which  is  "  May  the  god  Narsingh  always  help  Bijai  Bahadur  Singh,  son  of 
Nizam  Singh." 

Residence. — Narsinghpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BIJAI  CHAND  MAHTAB,  Mahdrdj- Kumar.     See  Burdwan. 

BIJAI  SINGH  MBHTA,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1878. 
Residence. — Jodhpur,  Rajputdna. 

BIJAWAR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  SAWAI  BHAN 

PARTAB  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  24th  December  1842.  Succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  November 
1847.  His  Highness  the  Chief  of  Bijawar,  like  those  of  Charkhari  and 
Ajaigarh,  is  descended  from  Jagat  Raj,  the  second  son  of  the  Maharaja 
Chhatarsal ;  and  the  Bijawar  territory  is  a  portion  of  that  which  was  ruled  by 
his  great  ancestor.  The  second  son  of  Jagat  Raj  was  Birsinghdeo  of  Bijawar  ; 
and  the  son  of  the  latter,  named  Kesri  Singh,  obtained  a  sanad  from  the 
British  Government  in  1811.  The  great-grandson  of  the  last-named  is  the 
present  Maharaja  Bahadur.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  974  square  miles  ; 
its  population  113,285,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  2405  Muhammadans  and 
2506  Jains.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  100  cavalry,  1000 
infantry,  and  1 3  guns  ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns.  The  family 
is  Bundela  Rajput  (Hindu)  ;  its  motto  is  Agni  pratdp  Vishwesha  (Hindi, 
meaning  "  As  fire  resplendent,  the  Lord  of  the  World  ") ;  and  its  banner  was 
unfurled  at  the  Delhi  Imperial  Assemblage  in  1877. 

Residence. — Bijdwar,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

BUNA,  DIWAN  MAKUND  SINGH,  Jdgirddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Is  a  member  of  the  Hashtbhaiya  family  (see  Dhurwai),  who  are  Bundela 
Rajputs,  the  State  being  an  offshoot  of  that  of  Orchha  (q.v.)  Born  January 
1838  •  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1850.  Diwan  Sawant  Singh  of  Bijna  was 
the  second  son  of  Diwan  Rai  Singh,  the  common  ancestor  of  the  Hashtbhaiya. 
Sawant  Singh's  grandson,  Surjun  Singh,  obtained  a  sanad  from  the  British 
Government  in  1823  ;  and  his  grandson  is  the  present  Chief.  The  area  of 
the  State  is  27  square  miles;  its  population  2084,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Chief  maintains  a  military  force  of  4  cavalry,  30  infantry,  and  2  guns. 

Residence. — Bijna,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BUNT,  Rani  of. 

Is  the  widow  of  the  late  Raja  Kumud  Narayan  Bhup  of  Bijni,  and  is  in 
possession  of  the  Bijni  estates.  The  Bijni  family  is  descended  from  a 
younger  son  of  one  of  the  Rajas  of  Kuch  Behar  (q.v.) 

Residence. — Bijni,  Godlpdra,  Assam. 


BIKANIR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  RAJ  RAJBSHWAR 
SIROMAN  SRI  GANGA  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 


Born  1879.  Succeeded  to  the  gadi  iQth  August  1887.  Is  a  Rahtor 
Rajput,  descended  from  Bika  Singh,  the  founder  of  Bikanir,  who  was  the 
sixth  son  of  Rao  Jodha,  Chief  of  Jodhpur  (q.v.},  claiming  descent  from 
Umalrai,  fifty-sixth  in  descent  from  Rama.  The  title  was  confirmed  to  the 
family,  in  the  person  of  the  Maharaja  Guj  Singh,  by  the  Emperor  Ahmad 
Shah  of  Delhi  in  1752  A.D.  The  Bikanir  flag  is  yellow  and  red  —  the  former 
representing  Lakshmindrdyan,  and  the  latter  Devi.  The  area  of  the  State  is 
22,340  square  miles;  its  population  509,021,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  over 
50,000  Muhammadans  and  21,000  Jains.  His  Highness  (who  is  still  a 
minor)  maintains  a  military  force  of  400  cavalry,  564  infantry,  and  91  guns. 
He  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1  7  guns. 

Residence.  —  Bikanir,  Rajputdna. 


BILASPUR,  Rdjd  of.     See  Kahlur. 


BILAUDA,  THAKUR  SAMRAT  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1872  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1878.  Is 
descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  population  of  the  State  is 
about  276,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Bilauda,  Western  Mdlwa",  Central  India. 


BILBARI,  MHOSHA  walad  VAGHU,  Chief  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1860.  Is  descended  from  a  Puar  family.  The  State  is  one 
of  the  numerous  Dang  States  in  Khandesh ;  its  area  is  under  2  square  miles, 
and  its  population  about  1418,  chiefly  Bhils  (aborigines). 

Residence. — Bilbari,  KMndesh,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  85 


BILOD,  The  Khan  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  State  is  in  Western  Malwa,  Central  India,  and  the  succession  to  the 
gadi  was  undecided  at  the  time  when  information  was  obtained  in  1891. 
The  population  is  about  600,  partly  Hindus,  partly  Muhammadan ;  the  ruling 
family  is  Muhammadan. 

Residence. — Bilod,  Central  India. 

BIPIN  BIHARI  DATT,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  July  1888. 
Residence. — Hugli,  Bengal. 

BIPIN  KRISHNA  BASU  (BOSS),  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Ndgpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BIR  SHAMSHBR  JANG,  K.C.I.E.,  Maharaja  Sir. 
Prime  Minister  of  Nepal. 

His  Excellency  the  Prime  Minister  of  Nepal  was,  on  25th  May  1892, 
created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of 
India. 

Residence. — Khatmandu,  Nepal 

BIR  SINGH  DEO  (of  Kuarpur),  Thdkur. 

Born  1816.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  conferred  on  an 
ancestor  of  the  present  Thakur  by  one  of  the  Gond  Rajas  of  Mandla.  Is 
uncle  of  Thakur  Kirat  Singh,  and  a  sharer  in  the  tdluka  of  Kuarpur.  His 
sons  are  (i)  Kunwar  Himalchal  Singh,  (2)  Kunwar  Surat  Singh,  (3)  Kun- 
war  Himat  Singh. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BIRA  SINGHA  NARAYAN  RAI  (of  Madhavapassa),  Raja. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  not  to  have  been  formally  recognised 
by  Government.  The  family  at  one  time  possessed  three  farmdns  of  the 
time  of  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah,  bearing  the  seal  of  the  Nawab 
Murshid  Kuli  Khan,  confirming  Udai  Narayan  Rai  in  the  Zaminddri  of 
Chandradip,  Bakarganj. 

Residence. — Madhavapassa,  Bakarganj,  Bengal. 

BIRESHWAR  DATT,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


86  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BISHAN  CHAND  DUDHURIA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  loth  June  1852.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd 
January  1888  for  his  liberal  philanthropy  and  public  services.  Owns  lands  in 
the  districts  of  Maimansingh,  Murshidabad,  Birbhum,  Burdwan,  Bhagalpur, 
Faridpur,  and  Rajshahi,  and  has  always  contributed  to  charitable  and  other 
funds,  opening  annachatras  (or  poor-houses)  in  times  of  famine,  etc.  His 
son  is  named  Bijai  Singh  Dudhuria,  born  November  1879.  His  brother  is 
Rai  Budh  Singh  Dudhuria  Bahadur  (q.v.) 

Residence. — Azimganj,  Murshidabad,  Bengal. 


BISHAN  DATT  (of  Barwara),  Thdkur. 

Born  1831.    The  title  is  hereditary.     The  tdluka  was  given  to  the  family 
of  Anrudh  Singh  Baldeo  Sahai  by  Raja  Nizam  Shah  of  Mandla  about  1743. 
Residence. — Barwara,  Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


BISHAN  SABUP,  MUNSHI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Kekri,  Ajmir. 


BISHAN  SINGH  (of  Bheri),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  descended 
from  Sardar  Mahtab  Singh,  Miran  Kotia,  a  Sikh  Chief  famous  for  his  prowess, 
who  lived  in  1761  A.D.  His  son,  Sardar  Rai  Singh,  acquired  by  conquest 
some  villages  in  the  Ambala  district  more  than  a  century  ago. 

Residence. — Bheri,  Ludhidna,  Punjab. 


BISHAN  SINGH  (of  Nabha),  Diwdn,  C.I.E. 

The  Diwan  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire  on  ist  January  1890,  for  distinguished  services  to  the  State 
of  Nabha  in  the  Punjab. 

Residence. — Ndbha,  Punjab. 


BISHEN  LAL  SINGH  (of  Kendi),  Rdjd. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  have  not  been  formally  recognised  by  Govern- 
ment. The  family  is  descended  from  Raja  Nabir  Singh,  who  was  Zaminddr 
of  Kendi,  in  the  Hazaribagh  district,  at  the  commencement  of  the  i8th 
century.  The  Raja  has  a  son,  named  Iswar  Prasad  Singh,  who  bears  the 
courtesy  title  of  Tikait. 

Residence. — Hazdribagh,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  87 


BISHESHWAR  BAKHSH  SINGH,  Ral 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Jaunpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


BISHESHWAR  BAKHSH  SINGH,  Rai. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Partdbgarh,  Oudh. 


BISHNATH  SINGH  (of  Katra  Balkhera),  Thdkur, 

The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  Raja  Nizam 
Shah,  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

BISHNU  CHANDRA  DATTA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Has   rendered  good  service   as    Deputy   Postmaster  -  General,    Eastern 
Bengal,  and  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Dacca,  Bengal. 


BISHUN  NARAYAN  (of  Sidli),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred  on  i4th  August  1868.  Is  the 
son  of  the  late  Raja  Gauri  Narayan,  descended  from  a  family  said  to  be 
descended  from  the  ancestors  of  the  Maharaja  of  Kuch  Behar.  The  founder 
received  a  jdgir  from  the  Raja  of  Kuch  Behar ;  his  descendants  subsequently 
became  subjects  of  the  Mughal  Empire,  and  in  1765  came  under  British  rule. 
They  were  under  Bhutiya  control  for  some  time,  and  reverted  to  British  control 
after  the  Bhutan  war  in  1865. 

Residence. — Godlpdra,  Assam. 


BISHUNATH  SINGH,  Rao. 

Born  1 5th  September  1870;  succeeded  his  father  on  ist  October  1888. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  and  is  said  to  have  been  conferred  originally  on 
Raghubar  Singh,  Thakur,  father  of  Rao  Bishunath  Singh,  by  Raja  Gyan 
Chand. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


BOBBILI,  Rdjd  of. 
See  Venkatasveta  Chala-pathi  Ranga  Rao,  Ravu,  Rdjd. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BOD,  RAJA  JOGINDRA  DEO,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1857  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  5th  October  1879.  Belongs 
to  a  Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family,  founded  by  Ganda  Mardan  Deo,  seventy 
generations  back.  The  title  of  Raja  has  been  enjoyed  since  the  time  of  the 
Mahratta  rule;  it  was  formally  recognised  by  the  British  Government  on 
2ist  May  1874,  in  the  lifetime  of  the  late  Raja  Pitambar  Deo,  father  of  the 
present  Raja.  The  eldest  son  of  the  ruling  Raja  is  called  the  Jubaraj ; 
the  younger  sons  Babus.  It  is  said  that  the  Rajas  of  Bod  have  always 
been  famous  for  their  loyalty  to  the  Emperors  of  India  who  were  in  power 
from  time  to  time.  Formerly  there  was  a  main  route  through  this  State  to 
the  Central  and  Western  Provinces,  and  whenever  any  persons  duly  credited 
by  the  Muhammadan  or  Mahratta  rulers  passed  over  it  the  Rajas  of  Bod 
used  to  render  them  every  assistance,  and  thus  earned  their  favour.  When 
Raja  Pratap  Deb  was  the  ruler,  certain  officers  of  the  Muhammadan  Emperor 
were  passing  through  this  State  with  troops  en  route  to  Puri.  Some  of  the 
troops  having  caught  fever  it  was  necessary  for  them  to  halt  there  for  about 
a  month,  during  which  time  the  Raja  treated  them  very  hospitably,  and 
gained  their  good  opinion.  On  their  reporting  the  facts  to  the  Emperor,  the 
title  of  "  Swasti  Sri  Derlakhya  Dumbadhipati  Jharkhund  Mandaleswar  "  was 
conferred  upon  the  then  Raja.  This  title  continued  till  the  time  of  Raja 
Banamali  Deb,  when  certain  Mahratta  officers  went  to  Sonpur  to  realise 
peshkash)  and  committed  much  violence.  The  people  of  Sonpur  formed  a 
conspiracy  to  kill  the  officers,  who  fled  to  Bod  for  refuge.  The  Sonpur 
people  continued  their  pursuit  up  to  Bod,  where  the  Raja  took  them 
prisoners  and  sent  them  to  Nagpur.  This  conduct  of  the  Chief  very  much 
pleased  the  Mahratta  ruler,  who  conferred  the  title  of  "  Swasti  Sri  Prabala- 
pratapaditya  Parutapa  Danasampanna  Jharkhand  Badshah"  on  the  Raja. 
This  title  was  subsequently  abbreviated  to  "  Jharkhand  Paichha " ;  and  in 
consideration  of  the  above,  the  Raja  was  once  for  all  exempted  from  paying 
peshkash  to  the  Mughal  and  Mahratta  rulers.  The  area  of  the  State  (which 
is  one  of  those  known  as  the  Orissa  Tributary  Mahals)  is  about  2064  square 
miles;  its  population  130,103,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  over  37,000  belonging  to 
aboriginal  tribes.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  592  infantry  and 
2  guns. 

Residence. — Bod,  Orissa. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  89 

BOLANDBA,  THAKUR  SALAMSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1865.  Is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  about  14  square  miles;  its  population  about  873,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Bolandra,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

/ 

BOMANJI  SOHRABJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

BONAI,  RAJA  INDAR  DEO  BAHADUR,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1836;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  i2th  September  1876. 
Rendered  good  service  to  the  Government  during  the  Keonjhar  disturbances 
in  1867-68.  Is  descended  from  a  Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family,  who  call  them- 
selves Kodam  Bangsa,  because  the  progenitor  of  the  race  was  born  under  a 
kodam  tree.  The  infant,  it  is  said,  was  abandoned,  and  was  in  danger  of  falling 
into  the  hands  of  an  enemy,  when  a  peacock  swallowed  it,  and  kept  it  in  his 
craw  until  the  danger  was  over ;  and  in  gratitude  the  family  adopted  the 
peacock  as  its  crest.  The  title  of  Tikait  is  the  courtesy  title  of  the  heir- 
apparent  ;  that  of  Potait  is  borne  by  the  second  son,  that  of  Ldl  by  the  third 
son,  and  Bdbu  by  the  younger  sons,  if  any.  The  Raja  Bahadur  has  the 
following  sons — Tikait  Nilambar  Deo,  Potait  Bishambar  Deo,  Lai  Hari 
Krishna  Deo.  The  area  of  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Chota  Nagpur 
Tributary  Mahals)  is  about  1297  square  miles ;  its  population  24,026,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Bonai,  Chota  Ndgpur,  Bengal. 

BORKHBRA,  THAKUR  AMAR  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  is  descended  from  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family. 
Residence. — Borkhera,  Indore,  Central  India. 

BORKHERA  (WESTERN  MALWA),  THAKUR  BHAIRON 

SINGH,  Thdkur  oj. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  the  year  1858  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadt  in  1873.    The  popula- 
tion of  the  State  is  about  1000,  partly  Hindus,  partly  Muhammadans. 
Residence. — Borkhera,  Western  Malwa",  Central  India. 


90  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

BRAHMA  NARAYAN  SINGH,  Thdkur. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  not  to  have  been  officially  recognised. 
The  Thakur's  sons  all  bear  the  courtesy  title  of  Bdbu. 
Residence. — Manbhum,  Bengal. 

BRAJA  GOPAL  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  have  never  been  formally  recognised  by 
Government.  The  Raja's  elder  son  is  styled  Tikait,  his  name  is  Madan 
Mohan  Singh ;  and  the  younger,  whose  name  is  Sarat  Chandra  Singh,  has 
the  title  of  Hikim. 

Residence. — Mdnbhum,  Bengal. 

BRAJA  KISHOR  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  never  to  have  been  officially  recog- 
nised by  Government.  The  family  claims  to  be  of  Rajput  descent.  The 
Raja's  eldest  son,  named  Ramakanai  Singh,  bears  the  courtesy  title  of 
Jubardj ;  the  second,  named  Syamsundar  Singh,  bears  that  of  Hikim ;  the 
third  is  styled  Kumdr.  In  this  family  no  name  is  given  to  a  son  till  he 
attains  the  age  of  twelve  years.  The  younger  sons  of  the  Raja,  below  the 
third,  are  styled  Bdbu,  except  the  fourth,  who  sometimes  has  the  courtesy 
title  of  Bara  Thdkur. 

Residence. — Bdrabhum,  Mdnbhum,  Bengal. 

BRAMHA  NAND  MAL,  Paik-Rai. 

This  is  one  of  the  titles  that  appear  not  to  have  been  formally  recognised 
by  Government.  It  was  originally  conferred  by  one  of  the  old  Rajas  of 
Kujung. 

Residence. — Cuttack,  Orissa. 

BRIJ  BHUKAN  LAL,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1820.  The  title  is  personal;  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May 
1882,  the  Rai  Bahadur  having  held  many  important  public  offices,  having 
retired  on  pension  in  1872,  and  having  been  granted  a  medal  by  Govern- 
ment at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India.  Is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  of  Lucknow ;  one  of  the  founders  of  the 
Jubilee  High  School,  Lucknow ;  President  of  the  Kayastha  Sadar  Sabha  of 
India,  1888  ;  and  Secretary  to  the  Trustees  of  the  Husainabad  Endowment. 
Has  borne  for  many  years  a  high  character  for  loyalty  and  benevolence. 
His  son  is  named  Ananda  Prasad,  born  1846;  his  grandson,  Bansi  Dhar, 
born  1874;  his  great-grandson,  Manohar  Ldl,  born  1891. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

BRIJ  LAL  GHOSH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  8th  October  1879. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  91 

BRIJ  RAJ  SINGH  (of  Bhaddu),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  family  is  Rajput,  and  claims  descent  from 
the  Pandus,  being  of  the  same  stock  as  the  families  of  Kulu,  Bisauli,  and 
Bahadurwah.  Its  founder,  Raja  Jai  Singh,  was  a  tributary  of  the  Kanahya 
Sardar,  Jaimal  Singh.  His  grandson,  Raja  Umaid  Singh,  on  the  grant  of  the 
hill  territories  by  the  British  Government  to  the  Maharaja  Ghulab  Singh  of 
Kashmir  and  Jammu,  was  dispossessed  of  his  territories,  but  received  a 
pension  from  the  British  Government  from  the  territories  ceded  by  the  Maha- 
raja to  meet  this  and  similar  claims.  He  settled  in  Nurpur,  Kangra  district. 

Residence. — Ka"ngra,  Punjab. 

BUDDHA  KHAN,  Khan. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Hathan,  Merwara. 

BUDH  SINGH  DUDHURIA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888.     Is  a 
brother  of  the  Rai  Bishan  Chand  Dudhuria  Bahadur  (q.v.) 
Residence. — Murshidabad,  Bengal. 

BUDHO  KHAN  walad  MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

BULAKA  SINGH,  Sardar. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

BUN  BBHARI  KAPUR  (of  Burdwan),  Rdjd. 

Title  of  Raja  conferred,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Born  nth  November  1853  ;  adopted  by  the  third  brother  of  the  late 
Maharaja  Adhiraj  Mahtab  Chand  Bahadur  of  Burdwan  on  3  ist  August 
1856.  Appointed  Diwan-i-Rdj  of  Burdwan  in  1877,  and  Vice-President 
of  the  Burdwan  Raj  touncil  in  1879.  At  the  Imperial  Assemblage 
of  Delhi  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclama- 
tion of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  received  a 
Certificate  of  Honour,  was  appointed  Honorary  Magistrate,  and  Member 
of  the  District  Board  of  Burdwan;  and  on  23rd  January  1885  a  Member 
of  the  Bengal  Legislative  Council.  Appointed  Joint  Manager,  Burdwan 
Raj  estate,  1885,  and  sole  Manager  in  1891  ;  and  has  rendered  admirable 
services  to  the  Burdwan  Raj  and  to  the  country  for  many  years  past.  He  is 
the  natural  father  of  the  present  Maharaj-Kumar  of  Burdwan  (who  is  still  a 
minor) ;  a  brother-in-law  of  the  late  Maharaja  Aftab  Chand  Bahadur,  and  a 
nephew  of  His  Highness  the  late  Maharaja  Mahtab  Chand  Bahadur  of 
Burdwan. 

Crest. — A  horse's  head,  erased,  proper. 

Residence. — The  Bonabas,  Burdwan. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


BUNDI,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAO  RAJA  RAGHUBIR 
SINGH  BAHADUR,  Mahdrao  Rdjd  of. 

Born  about  1868;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  March  1889.  Is  a 
Chauhan  (Kara)  Rajput  (Hindu),  descended  from  Rao  Deo  Singh,  son  of 
Rao  Bakht  Singh  Deoji,  who  founded  the  State  of  Bundi  about  the  year 
1242  A.D.  The  flag  of  the  family  is  coloured  yellow,  with  the  motto  Sri 
Rangesh  Bhagt  Bundesh  Ram  Singhe^  meaning  "  Raja  Ram  Singh,  ruler 
of  Bundi,  is  a  believer  in  Raghunathji."  The  State  is  situated  in  that  part 
of  Rajputana  known  as  the  Haraoti  and  Tonk  Agency.  Its  area  is  2300 
square  miles;  its  population  about  254,701,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  9477 
Muhammadans  and  3101  Jains.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force 
of  446  cavalry,  1835  infantry,  and  144  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of 
17  guns. 

Residence. — Bundi,  Rajputana. 

BUR  SINGH  (of  Mukerian),  Sardar,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

The  first  title  is  hereditary,  the  second  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
ist  June  1888.  The  Sardar  and  his  brothers  were  important  Sardars  during 
the  reign  of  the  Mahajara  Sher  Singh  of  Lahore.  When  Sher  Singh  was 
assassinated,  Sardar  Budh  Singh  (brother  of  Sardar  Bur  Singh)  was  killed  on 
the  spot,  and  his  cousin  severely  wounded.  Sardar  Bur  Singh  was  deputed 
to  Fatehgarh  to  remain  in  attendance  on  Shdhzada  Shahdeo  Singh,  son  of 
Maharaja  Sher  Singh,  who  accompanied  the  Maharaja  Dalip  Singh  to  that 
place. 

Residence. — Mukerian,  HoshiaVpur,  Punjab. 

BURDWAN,  MAHARAJ-KUMAR  BIJAI  CHAND  MAHTAB, 

Mahdrdj-Kumdr  of. 

Born  1 9th  October  1881.  Succeeded  the  late  Maharaja  Aftab  Chan d 
Mahtab  Bahadur,  Maharaja  of  Burdwan.  Belongs  to  a  Kapur  Kshatriya 

family  of  Kotli  in  Lahore,  Punjab, 
whence  Abu  Rai,  the  founder  of 
the  Burdwan  Raj  family,  migrated 
to  Bengal.  Was  adopted  by  the 
late  Maharaja,  and  is  the  son  of 
Raja  Bun  Behari  Kapur  of  Burd- 
wan (q.v.\  a  scion  of  the  same 
family,  who  is  also  the  guardian 
and  manager  of  the  large  estates 
of  the  young  Maharaj  -  Kumar. 
Abu  Rai  Kapur  settled  in  district 
Burdwan;  and  in  1657  A.D.  was 
appointed  Chaudhri  and  Kotwal 
of  Rekabi  Bazar,  etc.,  under  the 
Fauzdar  of  Chakld  Burdwan.  He 
was  succeeded  by  Babu  Rai,  who  owned  Pargand  Burdwan  and  three 
other  estates,  and  also  succeeded  his  father  as  Chaudhri.  Then  followed  in 
succession  his  son  Gyaneshyam  Rai,  and  his  grandson  Krishna  Rama  Rai ; 
the  latter  received  a  far  man  from  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb,  dated  24th 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  93 

Rabiwal  Akhir,  in  the  thirty-eighth  year  of  his  reign  (1695  A-D.),  confirming 
him  as  Zamindar  and  Chaudhri  of  Burdwan.  Succeeded  by  his  son  Jagat 
Rama  Rai,  who  received  a  similar  farmdn  from  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb, 
dated  5th  Jamadiwal  Awol,  in  the  forty-third  year  of  his  reign  (1700  A.D.)  ; 
and  again  his  son,  Kirti  Chandra  Rai,  who  succeeded,  received  a  similar 
farmdn  from  the  same  Emperor,  dated  2oth  Sawab,  in  the  forty-eighth  year 
of  his  reign  (1705  A.D.),  mentioning  him  as  Zamindar  and  Chaudhri  of 
forty-nine  Mahals  in  Pargand  Burdwan.  Kirti  Chandra  Rai  received  a 
second  farmdn  from  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah,  adding  some  Mahals^ 
in  the  year  1736  A.D.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Chitra  Sen  Rai; 
who,  in  the  twenty-first  year  of  the  reign  of  the  Emperor  Muhammad 
Shah  (1740  A.D.),  received  a  farmdn  recognising  him  as  Zamindar  of 
Chakld  Burdwan,  and  giving  him  the  title  of  Raja.  He  was  succeeded  by 
his  cousin,  the  nephew  of  Kirti  Chandra,  Raja  Tilak  Chandra  Rai ;  who 
received  a  sanad  from  the  Emperor  Ahmad  Shah,  dated  7th  Rajab,  in  the 
seventh  year  of  his  reign  (1753  A.D.),  confirming  him  as  Raja  of  Burdwan, 
etc.  In  1765  he  received  another  sanad  from  the  Emperor  Shah 
Alam,  granting  an  increase  of  the  Zaminddri,  and  the  additional  title  of 
Bahadur ;  and  about  the  same  time  the  same  Emperor  wrote  him  a  friendly 
letter,  intimating  his  creation  as  Raja  Bahadur,  and  also  as  a  Commander  of 
4000  infantry.  To  this,  in  the  official  farmdn  that  followed,  was  added  also 
the  command  of  2000  cavalry;  and  lastly,  in  the  ninth  year  of  the  Emperor 
Shah  Alam  (1768  A.D.),  he  received  from  the  Commander-in-Chief,  by  order 
of  the  Emperor,  a  sanad  conferring  the  title  of  Maharaja  Adhiraj,  and  making 
him  a  Commander  of  5000  infantry  and  3000  cavalry,  with  authority  for 
guns,  bands,  nakara,  etc.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  Maharaja 
Tej  Chandra  Rai,  who,  in  1771  A.D.,  received  a  similar  sanad  to  the  last- 
named.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  adopted  son,  Maharaja  Mahtab  Chand, 
who,  in  1833  A.D.,  received  a  farmdn  from  Lord  William  Bentinck, 
Governor-General,  confirming  him  in  the  title  of  Maharaja  Adhiraj  Bahadur. 
In  1868  he  obtained  for  himself  and  his  descendants  the  license  of  Her 
Majesty  to  bear  the  arms  and  supporters  described  below;  and  at  the 
Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  he  was 
granted,  as  a  personal  distinction,  the  right  to  receive  a  salute  of  13  guns. 
He  managed  his  great  estates  with  so  much  success  that  they  became  some 
of  the  most  prosperous  in  Bengal ;  and  at  the  time  of  the  Santal  Rebellion 
in  1855,  and  again  during  the  troubles  of  the  Mutiny,  the  Maharaja  did 
everything  in  his  power  to  strengthen  the  hands  of  the  Government,  by 
placing  elephants  and  bullock-carts  at  the  disposal  of  the  authorities,  and  by 
keeping  open  the  communications  in  the  neighbouring  districts.  On  his 
death  in  1879  he  was  succeeded  by  his  adopted  son,  the  late  Maharaja 
Aftab  Chand  Mahtab,  who,  on  attaining  his  majority  in  1881,  was  installed 
at  the  Palace,  Burdwan,  in  all  his  father's  honours  and  possessions.  He 
died  prematurely  in  1888,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  adopted  son,  the 
present  Maharaj-Kumar,  who  is  still  a  minor.  The  family  colour  is  dark- 
blue  with  scarlet  facings.  The  arms  are  azure,  an  ancient  Hindustani  shield 
proper,  between  in  chief  a  crescent  argent  and  in  base  two  swords  in  saltire, 
points  downwards,  also  proper.  The  crest  is  an  iron-gray  horse's  head, 
couped,  around  the  neck  a  riband  azure,  and  pendent  therefrom  an 
escutcheon  of  the  last,  charged  with  a  lotus-flower  proper.  The  supporters 


94  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

are,  on  either  side  an  iron-gray  horse  regardant,  around  the  neck  a  riband 
gules,  and  pendent  therefrom  an  escutcheon  of  the  last,  charged  with  a  lotus- 
flower  proper. 

Residences. — The  Palace,  Burdwan,  Bengal  ;  Mahtab  Manzil,  and  Dilaram, 
and  Dar-ul-Bahr  (Dilkusha  Gardens),  Burdwan  ;  The  Rajbdti,  Chinsurah,  Bengal ; 
The  Rajb£ti,  Kalna,  Bengal ;  The  Aftab  House,  Alipur,  Calcutta  ;  The  Rosebank, 
Darjiling  ;  The  Retreat,  Kurseong,  Bengal ;  and  other  residences  at  Bhdgalpur, 
Benares,  Cawnpur,  and  Agra. 

BURHAN-UD-DIN-KHAN,  FAKIR  SAYYID  (of  Lahore), 

Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title-is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Bhopdl,  Central  India. 

BYA  GALE,  MAUNG,  Ahmtidan  gaung  Tazeik-ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889.  It  means 
"Recipient  of  the  Medal  of  Honour  for  Good  Service,"  and  is  indicated 
by  the  letters  A.T.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Pegu,  Burma. 

BYRAMJBE  DADABHOY,  Khan  Bahadur. 
See  Behramji  Dadabhai,  Khan  Bahadur. 

CALICUT,  MAHARAJA  SIR  MANA  VIKRAMA  BAHADUR, 

K. C.S.I.,  Zamorin  of. 

Born  i Qth  March  1820 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  26th  March  1868.  The 
present  Zamorin  is  believed  to  be  the  1 1 9th  in  descent  from  the  founder  of 
the  family,  who  derived  his  title  from  Cheraman  Perumal,  the  last  Emperor 
of  Malabar.  The  tradition  is  that  there  were  two  youths  of  the  Eradi  caste 
from  Pumthura,  near  Erode,  who  rendered  Cheraman  Perumal,  the  last 
Emperor  of  Malabar,  signal  service  in  subduing  the  stronghold  of  an  eastern 
invader,  the  Chola  King  of  Choladesh.  When  Cheraman  Perumal  became  a 
Buddhist  in  352  A.D.,  and  retired  from  political  life,  dividing  his  empire  of 
Malabar  among  his  eighteen  feudatories,  it  chanced  that  these  two  youths  were 
absent  on  a  pilgrimage  to  Benares,  so  they  were  overlooked  in  the  distribution 
of  territory.  At  the  last  moment  they  returned,  and  were  presented  by  the 
Emperor  with  his  Imperial  sword,  and  a  small  piece  of  land  called  Kokorikot 
— whence  the  modern  Calicut — Cheraman  Perumal  bidding  them  win  what 
more  they  wanted  with  the  sword.  Accordingly,  when  Vasco  da  Gama 
arrived  at  Calicut  in  1498,  he  found  the  descendant  of  one  of  these  youths, 
the  Zamorin  of  Calicut,  ruling  over  the  greater  part  of  South  Malabar.  From 
that  time  the  Zamorins  were  mainly  engaged  in  wars  with  the  Rajas  of  Cochin 
and  their  allies,  the  Portuguese.  The  family  follows  the  well-known  Maru- 
makkatayam  law  of  inheritance,  by  which  the  succession  is  always  to  the 
offspring  of  its  female  members  only ;  among  these  the  next  eldest  male  to  the 
Zamorin  is  the  heir-apparent.  In  1766  the  then  Zamorin,  being  beleaguered 
by  Haidar  Ali  of  Mysore,  set  fire  to  his  palace,  and  voluntarily  perished  in 
the  flames.  Thenceforward  the  Zamorins  were  (with  short  intervals  of 
attempts  at  rebellion)  the  subjects  of  Haidar  and  Tippu,  until  the  Calicut 
territory  was  ceded  to  the  English  by  the  treaty  with  Tippu  in  1792.  The 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  95 

present  Zamorin  was  appointed  a  Fellow  of  the  Madras  University  in  1882, 
created  a  Maharaja  Bahadur  in  1878,  and  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most 
Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  on  25th  May  1892.  His  heir-apparent 
under  the  Marumakkatayam  law  is  Mana  Vikrama  Raja,  born  1832,  who 
bears  the  courtesy  title  of  "  The  Eralpad." 

Residence. — Calicut,  Malabar  District,  Madras. 

CAMBAY,  HIS  HIGHNESS  NAWAB  JAPAR  ALI  KHAN 
SAHBB  BAHADUR,  Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Bora  in  the  year  1848  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  nth  June  1880.  Belongs 
to  a  Mughal  (Shiah  Muhammadan)  family,  descended  from  Mirza  Jafar 
Nizam-ud-daula,  who  married  the  daughter  of  Momin  Khan  Dehlami,  agent 
for  Surat  and  Cambay.  The  Nawab  at  the  time  of  the  Treaty  of  Bassein  in 
1802  was  Fateh  AH  Khan,  who  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Bandeh  Ali 
Khan,  and  the  latter  by  his  nephew,  the  Nawab  Husain  Yar  Khan,  father  of 
the  present  Nawab.  The  full  title  of  His  Highness  is  Sardar  Nawab  Najib- 
ud-daula,  Mumtaz-ul-Mulk,  Munim  Khan  Bahadur,  Dilawar  Jang  Dawe 
Ekbalu,  His  Highness  Jafar  Ali  Khan  Saheb  Bahadur,  Nawab  of  Cambay. 
His  Highness  married  in  1876  the  Bibi  Gauhar  Khanum  Saheb,  and  in  1882 
the  Bibi  Khurshid  Jahan  Begum.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  350  square 
miles;  its  population  about  86,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  with  about  12,000 
Muhammadans.  The  Nawab  maintains  a  military  force  of  36  cavalry,  496 
infantry,  and  1 2  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Cambay,  Kaira,  Bombay. 

CASHMERE,  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  of. 
See  Jammu  and  Kashmir. 

CHADCHAT,  Thdkur  of.     See  Santalpur  and  Chadchat,  Thdkur  of. 

CHAMBA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  SHAM  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  in  1866  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1873.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  the  Raja  Sail,  who  in  very  early  times 
came  from  Marwar  to  Chamba.  In  1846  the  State  came  into  the  possession  of 
the  British  Government  after  the  first  Sikh  war,  and  a  part  of  it  was  made 
over  to  the  Maharaja  Golab  Singh  of  Jammu  and  Kashmir.  Subsequently, 
however,  by  an  arrangement  made  with  the  latter  in  1847,  Chamba  came 
again  entirely  under  British  control,  and  it  was  assigned  to  the  then  Raja, 
Raja  Sri  Singh,  and  his  heirs.  On  his  death  in-  1870  he  was  succeeded  by 
his  brother,  Raja  Gopal  Singh,  who  abdicated  in  1873,  and  was  succeeded 
by  the  present  Raja.  In  1854  the  sanitarium  of  Dalhousie  was  surrendered 
to  the  Government  by  the  Raja  of  Chamba,  in  consideration  of  the  remission 
of  part  of  the  yearly  tribute,  and  in  1867  the  cantonments  of  Bakloh  and 
Balun.  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  very  mountainous,  being  situated  in 
the  Himalayas,  on  the  frontiers  of  Kashmir,  is  about  3092  square  miles;  its 


96  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

population   115,773,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including    6859   Muhammadans. 
The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  12  cavalry,  200  infantry,  and  3  guns, 
and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 
Residence. — Chamba,  Punjab. 

CHAND  MAL,  SETH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Ajmir,  Rajputana. 

CHANDAR  SHIKHAR  (of  Sissaindi),  Rdjd. 

Born  2 Qth  October  1860;  succeeded  the  Raja  Kashi  Prasad  in  1873. 
Belongs  to  a  Tiwari  Brahman  family,  on  whom  the  title  of  Raja  was  con- 
ferred by  King  Amjad  Ali  Shah  of  Oudh,  and  it  was  recognised  as  hereditary 
by  the  British  Government  in  1877.  Raja  Kashi  Prasad  was  consistently 
loyal  during  the  Mutiny,  and  gave  great  assistance  to  British  officers.  He 
was  specially  mentioned  in  Lord  Canning's  Proclamation  of  March  1858  as 
one  of  the  six  loyal  Oudh  Talukdars,  and  was  granted  large  estates  as  a 
reward. 

Residence. — Sissaindi,  Lucknow,  Oudh. 

CHANDASINGH  EANSINGH  SHAHANI,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890. 
Residence. — Sind,  Bombay. 

CHANDRA  KANTA  TARKALANKAR,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty,  in  recog- 
nition of  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  the  holder  to  take  rank 
in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Mymensingh,  Bengal. 

CHANG  BHAKAR,  BHAYA  BALBHADRA  SINGH,  Bhaya  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  the  year  1825  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  December  1865. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  that  is  a  collateral  branch  of  the  Korea 
Chauhan  Rajputs,  descended  from  Jorawal  Singh,  a  younger  step-brother  of 
Raja  Garib  Singh  of  Korea.  The  Bhaya's  brother  is  named  Lai  Ran 
Bahadur  Singh.  The  State  is  one  of  those  known  as  the  Chota  Nagpur 
Tributary  Mahals.  Its  area  is  about  906  square  miles ;  and  its  population 
about  13,466,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Chang  Bhakar,  Chota  Na~gpur,  Bengal,  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  97 


CHARKHARI,    HIS    HIGHNESS    MAHARAJ-ADHIRAJ 
SIPADAR-UL-MULK  MULKHAN  SINGH  BAHADUR, 

Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Bom  January  1872  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  loth  July  1880.  Belongs  to 
the  famous  Bundela  Rajput  family  founded  by  Bir  Singh  in  the  1 3th  century, 
who  first  took  the  clan  name  of  Bundela,  and  from  whom  are  descended  a 
very  large  number  of  celebrities  in  Central  Indian  history,  including  the  royal 
families  of  Orchha,  Panna,  Dattia,  Ajaigarh,  Charkhari,  Bijawar,  Sarila,  Jigni, 
Jaso,  Lughasi.  One  of  these  descendants,  the  Maharaja  Chhatarsal,  acquired 
the  sovereignty  of  Eastern  and  Northern  Bundelkhand.  Being  hard  pressed 
by  the  Mahrattas,  he  adopted  the  Peshwa  as  one  of  his  sons,  who  thus 
obtained  one-third  of  his  dominions,  including  Sagar,  Kalpi,  etc.  His  eldest 
son  inherited  Panna,  while  from  the  second  son,  Jagat  Raj,  descended  the 
Chiefs  of  Ajaigarh,  Charkhari,  Bijawar,  and  Sarila.  The  son  of  Jagat  Raj 
was  Kirat  Singh ;  and  the  grandson  of  the  latter,  the  Maharaja  Vikramaditya 
of  Charkhari,  received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1 804.  His 
grandson  was  the  Maharaja  Jai  Singh,  who  attended  the  Imperial  Assemblage 
at  Delhi  in  January  1877,  and  in  celebration  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her 
Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India  received  the  additional  title  of 
Sipadar-ul-Mulk.  His  son  is  the  present  Maharaja,  who  succeeded  as  a 
minor  in  1880,  attained  his  majority  in  January  1892,  and  assumed  the 
Government  of  his  State  at  a  grand  Darbar  held  at  Charkhari  on  loth 
November  1892.  At  this  Darbar  were  present,  besides  the  Maharaja  and  the 
young  Raja  of  Sarila,  all  the  principal  jagirdars,  thakurs,  and  officials  of  the 
State,  numbering  more  than  a  hundred.  The  area  of  the  State  is  788  square 
miles;  its  population  about  143,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  with  6000  Muham- 
madans.  The  motto  of  the  family  is  Singhasanesho  ran  Vijayi  ("The 
Master  of  the  Throne  is  the  Victorious  in  War  ").  The  Maharaja  maintains 
a  military  force  of  188  cavalry,  1552  infantry,  and  42  guns,  and  is  entitled 
to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence, — Charkhdri,  Central  India. 


\ 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


CHBNTSAL  RAO,  P.,   C.I.E. 

Born  1832  ;  Sarishtadar  of  the  Madras  Revenue  Board,  1872;  Fellow 
of  the  Madras  University,  1875;  Superintendent  of  Stamps  and  Stationery, 
1882  ;  Member  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  Fort  St.  George,  1887,  and  of 
the  Governor-General's  Council,  1892  ;  cr.  C.I.E. ,  1887. 

Residence. — Madras. 

CHEPPADIRA  TBIMMIAH,  Rat  Bahddur. 

Is  the  Subahdar  of  the  Yedenalknad,  Kurg,  and  received  the  title  as  a  per- 
sonal distinction  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Mercara,  Kurg. 

CHBRRA,  HAJAN  MANIK,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1833;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  24th  May  1875.  The  Chief 
and  his  people  (said  to  number  about  9000)  are  Khasis.  This  is  one  of  the 
Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States. 

Residence. — Cherra,  Khasi  Hills,  Assam. 

CHET  SINGH  (of  Bhikra),  Rao. 

Born  1 5th  April  1851.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  has  long  been  recog- 
nised. The  family  are  Sengar  Rajputs,  descended  from  the  Rajas  of  Rura 
in  Etawah.  The  Rao  has  a  son  and  heir,  named  Lala  Tej  Singh,  born  8th 
October  1866. 

Residence. — Bhikra,  Etdwah,  North- Western  Provinces. 


CHETAN  SHAH,  Khan  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Shdhpur,  Punjab. 


CHHALIAR,  RAWAL  CHHATRASINGHJI,  Rdwal  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  the  year  1863;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2ist  June  1888. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  which  pays  a  tribute  to  the  Gaekwar  of 
Baroda,  as  well  as  to  the  Paramount  Power.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about 
9  square  miles. 

Residence. — Chhalia"r,  Rewd  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  99 


CHHATARPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  VISHWANATH 
SINGH  BAHADUR,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 


Born  2  Qth  August  1866;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i4th  November  1866. 
Belongs  to  a  Puar  Rajput  (Hindu)  family  ;  descended  from  the  Sardar  Soneh 
Sah,  a  Sardar  of  the  Panna  Raj,  who  was  in  military  possession  of  the 
Chhatarpur  jdgir  when  the  British  acquired  Bundelkhand.  He  was  granted 
a  sanad  by  the  British  Government  in  1806,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
the  Raja  Partab  Singh.  The  grand-nephew  of  the  latter  was  the  Raja  Jagat 
Raj,  the  father  of  the  present  Raja.  The  family  motto  is  Agni  pratdp 
Vishweshah  ("  As  fire  resplendent,  Lord  of  the  World  ").  The  area  of  the 
State  is  1169  square  miles;  its  population  about  167,700,  chiefly  Hindus, 
with  about  5500  Muhammadans  and  749  Jains.  The  Raja  maintains  a 
military  force  of  39  cavalry,  814  infantry,  and  39  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  1  1  guns. 

Residence.  —  Chhatarpur,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


CHHATRA  KUNWAI  (of  Amgaon),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  derived  from  Raja  Hindi  Shah 
of  Garha-Mandla.     The  family  is  Lodhi. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


CHHATRA  SINGH,   Subahddr-Major,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  June  1887  for  eminent 
military  service. 

Residence. — Burma. 

CHHBDI  LAL,  LALA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  bestowed  on  ist  June  1888.  The  Rai 
Bahadur's  grandfather,  Lala  Sadasukh,  was  a  wealthy  grain  and  cotton 
merchant  in  Cawnpur. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


CHHOTA  BARKHBRA,  BHUMIA  MUGAT  SINGH,  Bhumia  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1865  ;  succ|eded  to  the  gadi  i4th  September  1889.  Is  descended 
from  a  Bhilala  family.  The  population  of  the  State  is  about  125,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Chhota  Barkhera,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 


100 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


CHHOTA  UDAIPUR,  MAHARAWAL  SHRI  MOTISINGHJI, 

Raj  a  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  yth  July  1881.  Belongs  to  a 
Chauhan  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  the  famous  Patai  Rawal, 
the  last  Chauhan  Chief  of  Champaner,  from  whom 
also  descend  the  Chiefs  of  Baria.  When  Cham- 
paner was  captured  by  the  Muhammadans  under 
Muhammad  Begar  in  1484,  the  Chauhans  moved 
to  Chhota  Udaipur  and  to '  Baria.  The  Raja 
Jitsinghji,  father  of  the  present  Raja,  bravely 
resisted  Tantia  Topi  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857  ; 
and  the  latter  was  defeated  by  General  Parke 
when  encamped  before  the  town  of  Chhota  Udaipur. 
The  family  at  one  time  occupied  a  fort  at  Mohan  ; 
it  pays  tribute  to  the  Gaekwar  of  Baroda.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  about  873  square  miles;  its 
population  about  71,000,  chiefly  Bhils  or  Kolis 
or  other  aboriginal  tribes.  The  Maharawal  main- 
tains a  military  force  of  50  cavalry,  256  infantry, 
and  4  guns  ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Chhota  Udaipur,  Rewd  Kantha,  Bombay. 


The  Santak  of  the  Chauhan 
Rajputs,  called  Ckakra,  used 
in  the  seal  and  for  signature. 

(A  circle  with  four  Trisulas  or 
Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car- 
dinal points*) 


CHIKLI,  GUMAN  SINGH,  Chief  of . 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  the  year  1864;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  November 
1888.  Is  a  Muhammadan,  but  descended  from  a  Wasava  Bhil  (aboriginal) 
family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  200  square  miles;  its  population 
about  1444,  chiefly  (aboriginal)  Bhils. 

Residence. — Chikli,  Khandesh,  Bombay. 

CHIKTIABAR,  BHUMIA  UMBD  SINGH,  Bhumia  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1845;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1864.  The  population  of 
the  State  is  about  415,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Chiktiabar,  Bhopawar,  Central  India. 


CHINCHLI,  NAIK  JINMYA  walad  GUDAD  BHAVAN,  Chief  of 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  State  is  also  called  Dang  Chinchligadad,  being  one  of  the  numerous 
Dang  States  in  Khandesh  ;  and  the  Chief  or  Naik,  sometimes  called  Zimna 
walad  Bhawan,  is  a  minor  and  unmarried ;  belongs  to  an  aboriginal  Bhil 
tribe.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about,  2  7  square  miles ;  and  its  population 
about  1668. 

Residence. — Chinchli,  Khdndesh,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  101 


CHIRAKAL,  KERALA  VARMA  RAJA,  Valiya  Rdjd  of. 

Born  1849.  Is  tne  head  of  one  of  the  branches  of  the  Kolattiri  House, 
the  Raja  of  Kolattiri  having  been  one  of  those  chieftains  among  whom  Chera- 
man  Perumal,  Emperor  of  Malabar,  divided  his  dominions  when  he  became 
a  Buddhist  and  retired  from  the  world  in  352  A.D.  In  1734  the  Chirakal 
Raja  was  acknowledged  by  all  the  members  of  the  Kolattiri  House  as  the 
head  of  the  family,  and  was  entrusted  with  the  administration.  The  Raja  at 
the  time  of  Tippu's  invasion  in  1789  was  named  Rama  Varma,  and  he 
committed  suicide1  to  avoid  falling  into  the  hands  of  the  conqueror.  A 
prince,  who  took  refuge  in  the  jungles  until  the  English  obtained  possession 
of  the  country,  was  recognised  by  them  in  1795  as  Raja.  The  family,  like 
that  of  the  Zamorin  of  Calicut  and  other  Chiefs  of  Malabar,  follows  the 
Marumakkatayam  law  of  inheritance ;  by  which  the  succession  is  to  the  off- 
spring of  its  female  members,  among  whom  the  next  eldest  male  after  the 
Raja  is  his  heir-apparent.  The  late  Valiya  Raja  of  Chirakal  was  called 
Rajaha  Raja ;  and  he  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Valiya  Raja  under  the 
Marumakkatayam  law.  He  receives  an  allowance  from  Government,  in 
compensation  for  the  estate  that  belonged  to  his  ancestors. 

Residence. — Malabar,  Madras. 

CHIRODA,  DEVI  SINGH,  Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  Chief  is  of  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.     His  State  contains  an  area  of 
about  i  square  mile;  with  a  population  of  241,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Chiroda,  Ka'thiclwa'r,  Bombay. 

CHITPAL  SINGH  (of  Nurpur  Chitpalgarh),  Rdjd. 

Born  7th  August  1847;  succeeded  his  father  as  Raja  in  1852.  The 
title  is  hereditary,  and  was  so  recognised  on  9th  May  1866.  The  Raja 
represents  one  of  the  chief  families  of  the  ancient  Sombansi  race,  and  is  the 
most  direct  descendant  of  the  great  Rajas  of  Partabgarh.  The  Raja  Duniapat, 
who  possessed  Partabgarh,  was  succeeded  by  his  widow,  the  Thakurain  Kusal 
Kunwar,  who  adopted  Shiuratan  Singh  of  Karain  and  Tarwal.  His  son  was 
the  Raja  Dhir  Singh  of  Chitpalgarh ;  and  the  grandson  of  the  latter  is  the 
present  Raja,  who  was  educated  at  the  Partabgarh  High  School,  was  appointed 
to  the  Statutory  Civil  Service  in  1881,  and  is  now  an  Assistant  Commissioner 
in  Oudh. 

Residence. — Partdbgarh,  Oudh. 

CHORANGLA,  RAWAL  RAMSINGHJI,  Rdwal  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  the  year  1846,  of  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  His  State 
contains  an  area  of  nearly  4  square  miles,  and  a  population  of  about  1300, 
chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Chorangla,  Rewa"  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


I02  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


CHOTA  LAL  SIJWAR,  CJ.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1884. 

CHOTA  NAGPUR,  Maharaja  of. 
See  Pratap  Udit  Nath  Sahai  Deo,  Mahdrdjd. 

CHUIKADAN,  Mahant  of.     See  Kondka. 

CHUMILAL,  VENILAL,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Broach,  Bombay. 

CHURA,  THAKUR  BBCHARSINGHJI  RAISINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  Qth  February  1840;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  January  1844;  is 
a  scion  of  the  Wadhwan  family,  being  a  Jhala  Rajput,  and  thus  connected  in 
race  with  the  ruling  Houses  of  Wankaner  and  Dhrangadra.  The  present 
Thakur  has  a  son  and  heir,  named  Kumar  Madhavasinghji. 

Residence. — Chura,  Kdthidwdr,  Bombay. 

COCHIN,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  SIR  VIRA  KERALA 
VARMA,  K.C.I.E.,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1846  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1888.  Belongs  to  a  Hindu  family 
of  pure  Kshatriya  blood,  claiming  descent  (with  the  Royal  House  of  Travan- 
core)  from  the  ancient  Chiefs  who  ruled  from  Gokura  in  North  Kanara  to  the 
southernmost  point  of  India.  In  the  time  of  Haidar  AH  in  Maisur,  the  Raja 
of  Cochin  was  tributary  to  that  potentate;  but  in  1798  he  signed  a  treaty, 
acknowledging  himself  tributary  to  the  British  Power.  The  father  of  the 
present  Raja  was  His  Highness  the  Raja  Rama  Varma,  who  was  created  a 
Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  in  1871. 
The  armorial  bearings  of  the  family  are  a  palanquin  with  umbrella,  lamp,  and 
conch  or  chank-shell.  The  heir  of  His  Highness  the  Raja  is  the  Prince 
Rama  Varma,  Elaya  Raja,  born  1852.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1361  square 
miles  ;  its  population  about  600,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  with  about  33,000 
Muhammadans  and  136,000  Christians.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military 
force  of  1 6  cavalry,  327  infantry,  and  4  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute 
(hereditary)  of  17  guns. 

Residence. — Tripuntora,  Ernakolam,  Southern  India. 

COOCH  BEHAR,  Mahdrdjd  of.     See  Kuch  Behar. 
CUTCH,  His  Highness  the  Rao  of.     See  Kutch. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  103 


DABHA,  MIAN  GULAB  MIYAN,  Mian  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  5th  November  1837  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  27th  July  1854.  Is 
one  of  the  Gaekwar's  tributaries.  Belongs  to  a  family  claiming  descent  from 
the  Jhala  Rajputs  of  Halwar  in  Kathiawar ;  his  ancestor,  Hari  Singhji,  who 
was  in  the  service  of  Shah  Mahmud  Begara  of  Gujarat,  became  a  Musalman 
in  1483.  His  son  and  heir  is  Kunwar  Motamiyan.  The  area  of  the  State 
is  about  99  square  miles;  its  population  is  1922,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Da"bha,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

DABIR,  Bhumia  of.     See  Jamnia. 

DABRI,  THAKUR  PARBAT  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1878;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1885.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Dabri,  Western  Mdlwa",  Central  India. 

DAD  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Dadu  Dero,  Sind. 

DADABHAI  HORMUSJI  DUBA,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  received  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  2£th 
May  1892  in  recognition  of  great  public  services. 
Residence. — B  ombay . 

DADABHAI  PALANJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2ist  April  1882. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

DADHALYA,  THAKUR  JASWANT  SINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1830.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family  that  came  originally 
from  Udaipur.  His  ancestor  Vikaji  was  in  the  service  of  Kalyan  Mai,  Rao 
of  Idar,  from  whom  he  obtained  the  grant  of  Dadhalya  in  1674 ;  is  tributary 
to  the  Gaekwar  and  to  Idar.  The  area  of  the  State  is  7  2  square  miles  ;  its 
population  3877,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Dadhalya,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


104  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DAFLAPUR,  Chief  of.     See  Jath. 

DAJI  GANGAJI  RANG,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  loth  April  1873. 
Residence. — B  ombay. 

DAJI  GOVIND  GUPTB,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  28th  February  1883. 
Residence. — Thana,  Bombay. 

DAJI  NILKANTH  NAGARKAR,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

DAL  CHAND  (of  Sahanpur),  Rai. 

Born  October  1827.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  the  representative  of  a 
Jat  family  of  ancient  origin,  who  came  from  Jind  in  the  middle  of  the 
1 6th  century.  A  scion  of  this  family,  named  Muchh  Padarath,  founded 
the  town  of  Nagal  on  the  Ganges ;  and  rising  to  high  favour  with  Prince 
Salim  (afterwards  the  Emperor  Jahangir)  in  the  Court  of  the  Emperor  Akbar, 
obtained  a  Dress  of  Honour,  the  title  of  Rai,  and  the  grant  of  the  territory 
between  Nagal  and  Barhapura.  The  Rai  Tapraj  Singh,  grandfather  of  the 
present  Rai,  was  a  man  of  great  influence.  The  Rai  has  four  sons — Partab 
Singh,  Harbans  Singh,  Jagat  Singh,  and  Bharat  Singh. 

Residence. — Sahanpur,  Bijnaur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


DAL  SINGH  (of  Nahil),  Rao. 

Born  1842;  succeeded  his  father,  Rao  Jetsingh,  in  1884.  The  title  is 
hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  family  of  Katehria  Rajputs,  claiming  descent  from 
Rao  Hari  Singh,  who,  in  the  i6th  century,  settled  in  Gola  Raipur  on  the 
river  Khanant.  A  farmdn  of  the  Emperor  Shah  Jahan,  dated  1645,  con- 
ferred the  Zaminddri  of  Gola  on  Vikrama  Singh,  a  descendant  of  Rao  Hari 
Singh,  and  subsequently  the  family  removed  to  Nahil.  They  had  many 
struggles  with  the  Pathans  during  the  i7th  and  i8th  centuries,  in  the 
course  of  which,  on  one  occasion,  the  Rao  Gopal  Singh,  Katehria  Thakur 
of  Nahil,  was  slain  in  an  engagement,  leaving  only#  widow  and  two  infant 
sons  as  the  sole  representatives  of  the  family.  Rao  Jetsingh,  father  of  the 
present  Rao,  did  good  service  in  the  Mutiny,  defending  the  town  of  Pawayan 
when  the  Maulavi  Ahmadullah  Shah  besieged  it  in  1857  ;  and  he  also  supplied 
provisions  to  the  British  forces  on  their  arrival  in  the  district.  The  Rao  Dal 
Singh  has  three  sons — Bechu  Singh,  Jagannath  Singh,  and  Sardan  Singh. 

Residence. — Ndhil,  Shdhjahdnpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  105 


DALIP  SINGH,  G.C.S.I.,  His  Highness  the  Maharaja. 

The  title  is  personal.  His  Highness  the  Maharaja,  who  lives  in  Europe, 
is  the  representative  of  the  "  Lion  of  the  Punjab,"  the  famous  Maharaja 
Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore,  under  whom  the  Sikh  power  rose  to  its  highest 
point. 

Residence. — Europe. 

DALIP  SINGH  (of  Kulu),  Rai. 

Born  1862.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  family  whose  founder, 
Sudh  Singh,  emigrated  from  Mayapuri  to  Kulu  in  the  beginning  of  the 
1 4th  century,  and  established  himself  there,  assuming  the  title  of  Raja. 
His  son,  Raja  Bahadur  Singh,  succeeded  him,  and  greatly  extended  his 
dominions  by  conquest.  The  family  enjoyed  independence  up  to  the  time 
of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore,  who  wrested  the  country  from  the 
Rai  Jitsingh,  the  last  independent  Raja  of  Kulu,  but  bestowed  the  Wazir-i- 
Rupi  estate  in  Kulu  on  Rai  Thakur  Singh,  a  relative  of  Jitsingh's.  This 
grant,  with  the  hereditary  title  of  Rai,  was  confirmed  by  the  British  Govern- 
ment by  a  sanad  dated  24th  October  1846.  On  his  death  Rai  Thakur 
Singh  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Rai  Gayan  Singh,  who  was  the  father  of 
the  present  Rai. 

Residence. — Ka"ngra,  Punjab. 


DALISNA,  THAKUR  DAULAT  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1857.     Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.     The  population  of 
the  State  is  765. 

Residence. — Dalisna,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


DALPATRAM  DAYABHAI,  C.I.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  6th  June  1885. 

Residence. — B  ombay . 

DALPATRAM  PRANJIVAN  KHAKAR,  Rao  Saheb. 

Born  at  Diu  on  ist  November  1835.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was 
conferred  on  i6th  February  1887.  Was  educated  at  the  Elphinstone  College, 
Bombay,  where  he  took*high  honours.  Appointed  to  the  Bombay  Education 
Service,  1859;  greatly  distinguished  himself  as  Educational  Inspector  of  Kutch, 
as  tutor  to  His  Highness  the  Rao  of  Kutch,  and  in  other  ways.  Has  written 
and  edited  many  important  works.  Retired  on  pension  in  1866;  and  in 
1887  received  the  title  in  honour  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty's  reign.  Is  a  Member  of  the  Managing  Committee  of  the  Seth 
Gokuldas  Tejpal  Charities,  and  a  Trustee  of  the  same ;  also  a  Member  of  the 


106  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Bombay  Branch  of  the  Royal  Asiatic  Society,  and  other  learned  Societies.  The 
Rao  Saheb  married,  1859,  Devkorbai,  daughter  of  Meghji  Jadavji,  physician 
of  Bhaunagar,  and  has  a  son,  Mazaulal,  born  nth  November  1870.  He  is 
a  Brahma-Kshatriya  by  caste,  and  belongs  to  a  family  long  settled  in  the 
Portuguese  dominions  in  Western  India. 

Residence. — 10  Cowasji  Patel's  Tank  Road,  Bombay. 


DAMARA  KUMARA  MADDU  VBNKATAPPA  NAYUDU 
BAHADUR  GARU  (of  Kalahasti),  Rdjd.     See  Kalahasti. 

DAMODAR  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

An  Honorary  Magistrate  of  Bareilly.  Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 

Residence. — Bareilly,  North- Western  Provinces. 

DAMODAR  NARAYAN,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — B  ombay . 

DANAKOTI  MUDALIYAR,  A.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1852.  A  landowner  in  Madras,  and  Member  of  the  Madras 
Municipal  Commission,  1885.  Granted  the  personal  title  of  Rai  Bahadur, 
1887. 

Residence.  — Madras. 


DANAKOTI  RAJU,  W.  B.,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born    1839.      M.D.   of  Madras;    appointed  a  Fellow  of  the   Madras 
University,  1875.     Granted  the  personal  title  of  Rao  Bahadur,  1889. 
Residence. — Madras. 


DANTA,  MAHARANA  JASWANTSINGHJI  HARISINGHJI, 

Mahdrdnd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 4th  October  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  December  1876. 
Is  tributary  to  the  Gaekwar  and  to  Idar.  Belongs  *to  a  very  ancient  family 
of  Pramara  Rajputs,  who  are  said  to  have  come  from  Ujjain,  and  to  have 
settled  in  Sind  in  the  year  809  A.D.  The  area  of  the  State  is  2300  square 
miles;  its  population  about  18,000.  The  Maharana  maintains  a  military 
force  of  70  cavalry  and  67  infantry. 

Residence. — Danta,  Mahi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


107 


DARBHANGA,  MAHARAJA  SIR  LACHHMBSWAR  SINGH 
BAHADUR,  K.C.I.B.,  Maharaja  of. 

One  of  the  Premier  Nobles  of  British  India. 

Born   1856;    succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor   2oth  October  1860. 
In  the  great  Bengal    famine   of   1873-74,   the   Maharaja  expended  nearly 

.£300,000  in  charitable  relief;  and  has 
since  then  always  taken  the  foremost 
part  in  every  public  philanthropic  work 
in  Bengal,  and  indeed  in  every  part  of 
the  Empire — to  which  his  vast  revenues 
have  been  largely  devoted. 

Belongs  to  an  ancient  Rajput 
family,  whose  ancestor,  Mahesh  Thakur, 
obtained  the  title  of  Raja,  and  the  grant 
of  the  Darbhanga  Raj,  from  the  Mughal 
Emperor  of  Delhi,  Akbar  the  Great, 
early  in  the  i6th  century.  Mahesh 
Thakur  died  in  the  year  1558  A.D., 
leaving  five  sons — Ram  Chandra  Thakur, 
Gopal  Thakur,  Achit  Thakur,  Parmanand  Thakur,  and  Subhankar  Thakur. 
Some  of  the  elder  sons  succeeded  in  turn  to  the  Raj,  but  they  all  died  without 
issue,  and  the  family  was  continued  in  the  line  of  the  youngest  son,  the 
Raja  Subhankar  Thakur.  He  died  in  1607,  leaving  six  sons.  Of  these 
the  eldest,  Purushottam,  succeeded  to  the  Raj ;  and  on  his  death  in 
1642  was  succeeded  by  his  brother,  Sundar  Thakur.  He  held  the  Raj  for 
twenty  years,  and  dying  in  1662  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son,  Mahinath 
Thakur.  The  latter  died  in  1684  without  issue,  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
brother,  Nirpat  Thakur,  who  ruled  till  1700  A.D.,  when  he  died,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  the  great  Raja  Raghu  Singh.  He  obtained  the  con- 
firmation of  the  hereditary  title  of  Raja  through  the  Nawab  Mahabat  Jang, 
who  was  at  that  time  Mughal  Subahddr  of  Behar.  He  also  obtained  from 
the  Mughal  Government  the  grant  of  the  lease  of  the  whole  of  the  Sarkdr 
Tirhut — including  the  modern  districts  of  Muzaffarpur  and  Darbhanga — on 
the  payment  to  Government  of  an  annual  revenue  of  Rs.  1,00,000.  The 
enormous  value,  in  those  early  times,  of  this  grant  may  be  gathered  from  the 
fact  that  in  1685  A-D- tne  revenue  of  Sarkdr  Tirhut  was  officially  returned 
at  Rs.  7, 6 9, 2  8 7.  At  one  time,  during  the  administration  of  the  Raja  Raghu 
Singh,  the  Nawab  Subahdar,  jealous  of  the  vast  wealth  accumulated  by  the 
Raja,  seized  his  property  and  carried  off  his  family  as  prisoners  to  Patna,  the 
Raja  himself  only  preserving  his  liberty  by  prompt  flight.  Subsequently, 
however,  he  was  restored  to  favour,  and  received  large  grants  from  the 
Mughal  Government,  on  condition  that  he  should  "do  justice,  relieve 
distress,  and  put  the  country  in  a  flourishing  condition."  These  stipulations 
have  been  liberally  fulfilled  by  Raja  Raghu's  descendants  and  successors  in 
the  Raj.  This  Raja  built  a  large  mud  fort  at  Bhawara,  near  Madhubani,  the 
ruins  of  which  still  remain  there,  and  the  family  resided  there  for  the  next 
half-century.  He  died  in  1736,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  Raja 
Bishnu  Singh.  The  latter  died  without  issue  in  1740,  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  brother,  the  Raja  Narendra  Singh,  who  received  large  grants  from  the 
Nawab  Subahdar  AH  Vardi  Khan,  on  condition  of  his  engaging  for  the 


io8  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

revenue,  and  supporting  the  interests  of  the  Mughal  Government.  The  Raja 
Narendra  Singh  died  without  issue  in  1760;  but  he  adopted  Pratap  Singh, 
the  great-great-grandson  of  Narayan  Thakur,  younger  brother  of  the  Raja 
Sundar  Thakur,  and  son  of  the  Raja  Subhankar  Thakur  mentioned  above. 
Raja  Pratap  Singh  determed  to  remove  the  family  residence  from  the  fort  of 
Bhawara ;  and  he  built  a  new  Rajbari  at  Darbhanga,  to  which  he  removed 
in  1762,  and  it  has  been  the  seat  of  the  family  ever  since.  Raja  Pratap 
Singh  died  in  1776,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother,  the  Raja  Madhu 
Singh.  In  that  year  the  Raja  received  from  Shah  Alam,  the  Mughal 
Emperor  of  Delhi,  the  grant  of  Dharmpur,  in  the  district  of  Purniah.  The 
Raja  Madhu  Singh,  during  a  long  administration  of  thirty-two  years,  had 
frequent  disputes  with  the  Calcutta  Government  in  regard  to  the  revenue 
payments  and  the  extent  of  his  rights  over  the  land.  These  disputes  at  one 
time  became  so  acute  that  the  settlement  was  made  with  others ;  but  ulti- 
mately he  obtained  from  the  Board  of  Revenue  the  restoration  of  his  estates. 
'The  Raja  Madhu  Singh  died  in  1808,  leaving  five  sons — Kishan  Singh,  who 
died  without  issue ;  Chhatar  Singh,  who  succeeded  him,  and  three  others. 
Chhatar  Singh  is  the  first  of  the  Darbhanga  Rajas  who  is  recorded  to  have 
held  the  higher  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur,  though  it  is  probable  that  it  had 
also  been  held  by  some  at  least  of  his  ancestors.  The  Maharaja  Chhatar 
Singh,  who  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1808,  lived  till  1839;  when,  on  the 
ground  of  old  age,  he  made  over  his  estates  and  the  title  to  his  elder  son, 
Rudra  Singh — giving  to  his  younger  son,  Bisdeo  Singh,  for  maintenance,  the 
Raj  villages  in  Jarail,  four  Bouses,  two  elephants,  and  apartments  in  the 
Darbhanga  Palace.  He  asked  to  have  Rudra  Singh's  name  entered  in  the 
Bengal  Revenue  Roll,  and  died  a  few  days  afterwards.  These  arrangements 
led  to  extensive  litigation,  as  the  younger  son  claimed  a  larger  share  of  the 
estates.  Ultimately  the  High  Court  decided  that  the  law  of  inheritance  in 
this  family  must  follow  the  family  custom,  and  not  the  ordinary  Hindu  law ; 
and  by  the  family  custom  (or  Kuldchdr)  the  eldest  son  succeeds  to  the  Raj, 
the  younger  obtaining  sufficient  properties  in  land  for  their  maintenance, 
which  lands  (as  under  feudal  tenure)  revert  to  the  Raj  on  failure  of  male 
issue.  The  Maharaja  Rudra  Singh  died  in  1850,  leaving  four  sons — Mahesh- 
war  Singh  (who  succeeded  him),  Ganeshwar  Singh,  Nitreshwar  Singh,  and 
Gopeshwar  Singh.  For  ten  years  the  Maharaja  Maheshwar  Singh  held  the 
Raj.  He  died  on  2oth  October  1860,  leaving  two  sons — Lachhmeswar  Singh 
(who  succeeded  him,  and  is  the  present  Maharaja  Bahadur)  and  Rameshwar 
Singh  (who  is  now  the  Raja  Rameshwar  Singh  Bahadur,  q.v.) 

The  Maharaja  Lachhmeswar  Singh  Bahadur  of  Darbhanga  was  under  the 
guardianship  of  the  Court  of  Wards  during  his  minority ;  and  had  the  great 
advantage  of  having,  as  tutor,  a  very  able  and  sympathetic  English  gentle- 
man, Mr.  Chester  Macnaghten,  whose  capacity  for  this  work  was  so  marked 
that  he  was  afterwards  selected  by  the  Government  for  the  Principalship  of 
the  Rajkumar  College  at  Rajkot,  in  Kathiawar,  for  the  Princes  and  Chiefs  of 
Western  India.  Since  the  Maharaja  attained  his  majority  he  has  entirely 
devoted  himself  to  the  public  duties  of  his  position  as  one  of  the  greatest 
Nobles  of  British  India.  He  has  long  served  as  a  Member  of  the  Legislative 
Council  of  the  Viceroy,  and  taken  a  leading  part  in  the  debates  of  that  body. 
During  the  lengthened  discussions  on  the  important  Bengal  Tenancy  Bill,  he 
acted  (in  conjunction  at  first  with  the  lamented  patriot,  Kristodas  Pal,  and 
subsequently  with  the  Raja  Piari  Mohan  Mukharji,  C.S.I.)  as  the  repre- 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  109 

sentative  of  the  landowners  of  Bengal  and  Behar ;  and  received  the  warm 
recognition  of  the  ability  and  moderation  he  brought  to  bear  on  this  and 
other  questions  from  successive  Viceroys.  To  the  public  at  large  he  is  best 
known  as  one  of  the  most  munificent  of  living  philanthropists.  In  addition 
to  the  ^£300,000  expended  in  charitable  relief  during  the  Bengal  famine  of 
1873-74,  in  every  time  of  scarcity  the  Maharaja's  arrangements  for  meeting 
it  have  been  on  a  splendid  scale,  and  have  been  in  many  cases  the  models 
for  the  Government  measures.  He  has  built,  and  entirely  supports,  a  first- 
class  Dispensary  at  Darbhanga,  which  cost  ^"3400 ;  a  similar  one  at 
Kharakpur,  which  cost  ^3500;  and  largely  contributes  to  many  others. 
He  has  built  an  Anglo-vernacular  school  at  a  cost  of  ^1490,  which  he 
maintains,  as  well  as  nearly  thirty  vernacular  schools  of  different  grades ;  and 
subsidises  a  much  larger  number  of  educational  institutions.  He  has  con- 
structed hundreds  of  miles  of  roads  in  various  parts  of  the  Raj,  planting 
them  with  tens  of  thousands  of  trees  for  the  comfort  of  travellers.  He  has 
constructed  iron  bridges  over  all  the  navigable  rivers  of  the  Raj,  and  completed 
an  elaborate  system  of  irrigation-works,  for  prevention  of  famine.  In  carrying 
out  his  duties  as  one  of  the  largest  landowners  of  India  he  has  had  the 
advantage  of  the  assistance  of  several  very  able  English  managers  in  succession, 
specially  selected  with  the  approval  of  the  Government — including  Colonel 
Money  of  the  Staff  Corps,  Mr.  G.  W.  Llewhellin  and  Mr.  Henry  Bell,  formerly 
of  the  Bengal  Civil  Service.  With  the  aid  of  these  gentlemen  and  others, 
the  Darbhanga  Raj  has  attained  the  proud  position  of  being  regarded  as  the 
model  for  good  and  benevolent  management.  The  Maharaja  has  devoted 
special  attention  to  all  agricultural  improvements,  and  especially  to  improve- 
ments in  the  breeds  of  horses  and  cattle  in  Behar.  He  is  a  liberal  patron  of 
the  turf,  and  has  been  the  owner  of  the  largest  and  most  valuable  racing-stud 
in  India,  under  experienced  English  trainers ;  and  he  is  also  a  keen  sportsman 
and  a  first-rate  whip,  his  jungles  on  the  Nepal  frontier  affording  some  of  the 
best  sport  in  the  country.  The  new  Palace  at  Darbhanga,  with  its  immense 
stables,  its  botanical  and  zoological  gardens,  and  its  many  beautiful  surround- 
ings, is  well  known  in  England  by  the  sketches  that  have  appeared  in  the 
London  illustrated  papers. 

Most  of  the  Maharaja  of  Darbhanga's  munificence  has  been  devoted  to 
objects  of  charity  pure  and  simple,  such  as  famine-relief  medical  aid,  and 
the  like.  But  he  has  also  contributed  very  largely  to  objects  of  general 
public  utility — as,  for  instance,  in  the  gift  of  Rs. 50,000  to  the  funds  of  the 
Imperial  Institute.  In  celebration  of  Her  Majesty's  Jubilee  he  remitted  a 
large  portion  of  the  rents  of  all  his  tenants  for  the  year  1887.  It  has  been 
computed  that  since  his  succession  to  the  Raj  an  aggregate  sum  of  some- 
thing like  two  millions  sterling  has  been  expended  on  charities,  works  of  public 
utility,  and  charitable  remissions  of  rent. 

On  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the 
Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire.  The  family  cognisance  is  the 
Gangetic  dolphin  or  sacred  fish  of  the  Hindus.  The  Darbhanga  Raj  com- 
prises large  portions  of  the  modern  districts  of  Darbhanga,  Muzaffarpur, 
Monghyr,  Purniah,  and  Bhagalpur.  The  capital,  Darbhanga,  is  the  civil 
station  of  the  district  of  the  same  name ;  it  is  a  large  and  thriving  town,  with 
a  population  (by  the  census  of  1881)  of  65,955,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence, — Darbhanga,  Tirhut,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DARGAHI  LAL,  Rai  Bahadur, 

Born  2 1  st  November  1 8 1 6.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
2nd  January  1888,  in  recognition  of  eminent  public  services  as  a  Municipal 
Commissioner  of  Cawnpur  since  1862,  and  an  Honorary  Magistrate  since 
1879.  The  Rai  Bahadur  is  a  Kayasth  by  caste,  and  is  a  native  of  Bilgram 
in  the  Hardoi  district ;  but  has  practised  as  a  Pleader  at  Cawnpur  since 
1842. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


DARIA  KHBRI,  THAKUR  ONKAR  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1861;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  9th  April  1888.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family ;  the  predecessor  of  the  present  Thakur  was  Thakur 
Ranjit  Singh.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  6  square  miles ;  its  population 
about  6 1 6. 

Residence. — Daria  Kheri,  Bhopa"!,  Central  India. 


DARKUTI,  RANA  RAM  SARAN  SINGH,  Rdnd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1843;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i5th  October  1883.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  whose  founder  came  from  Marwar  at  an  unknown 
date  and  settled  in  the  Simla  Hills.  Twenty-three  generations  bore  rule ; 
and  the  father  of  the  present  Chief  was  the  Rana  Ram  Singh,  who  succeeded 
to  the  gadi  in  1856.  The  Gurkhas  overran  this  State,  with  others  in  the 
Simla  Hills ;  and  when  they  were  expelled  by  the  British  in  1815  the  then 
Rana  was  confirmed  in  possession.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  4  square 
miles;  its  population  590,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a  military 
force  of  10  infantry. 

Residence. — Darkuti,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


DARYA  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  xoth  April  1867. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


DARYAO  SINGH  (of  Ghat  Piparia),  Thdkur. 

Born  1831.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  conferred  by  the 
Mughal  Emperors  of  Delhi.  The  ancestors  of  the  Thakur  obtained  Ghat 
Piparia  in  jdgir  from  the  former  Government  of  Sagar. 

Residence. — Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  in 


DAS  MAL,  DIWAN,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  tne 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

DASPALLA,  RAJA  CHAITAN  DEO  BHANJ,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1854;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2ist  January  1873.  Belongs  to  a 
Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family,  said  to  be  of  the  Solar  race ;  descended  from  a 
younger  son  of  the  Raja  Narayan  Bhanj  of  Bod  (q.v.)  The  title  of  Raja  has 
been  enjoyed  by  the  head  of  the  family  since  the  time  of  the  Mahrattas  ;  and 
was  formally  conferred  by  the  British  Government,  2ist  May  1874.  The 
cognisance  of  the  family  is  a  peacock  with  tail  spread.  The  area  of  the 
State,  which  is  one  of  the  Orissa  Tributary  Mahals,  is  about  568  square  miles  ; 
its  population  about  42,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  about  13,000 
Kandhs  and  other  aboriginal  tribesmen.  The  Raja  maintains  a  force  of  343 
infantry  and  8  guns. 

Residence. — Daspalla,  Orissa,  Bengal. 

DATANA,  THAKUR  BHAWANI  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1864;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  loth  December  1880.  Belongs  to 
a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Datana,  Western  Malwa,  Central  India. 

DATTIA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  LOKINDAR 
BHAWANI  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Mahdrdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 3th  August  1854;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2oth  November  1857. 
Belongs  to  the  great  Bundela  Rajput  family  descended  from  Bir  Singh,  who 
took  the  clan  name  of  Bundela,  and  settled  in  Bundelkhand  in  the  i3th 
century ;  and  from  whom  are  descended  the  ruling  families  of  Orchha,  Dattia, 
Panna,  Ajaigarh,  Charkhari,  Bijawar,  Sarila,  etc.  In  the  time  of  the 
Emperors  Akbar  and  Jahangir,  the  Maharaja  Bir  Singh  Deo  was  ruler  of 
Orchha;  and  his  second  son,  Bhagwan  Rai,  became  ruler  of  Dattia.  The 
State  came  under  British  control,  with  other  territories  in  Bundelkhand,  by 
the  Treaty  of  Bassein,  concluded  with  the  Peshwa  in  1802.  The  Raja 
Parichhat  of  Dattia,  whose  first  treaty  with  the  British  Government  is  dated 
1804,  sided  with  the  British  throughout  the  subsequent  wars  with  the 
Mahrattas;  and  was  rewarded  in  1817,  on  the  deposition  of  the  Peshwa,  by 
a  new  treaty  and  enlarged  territories.  His  adopted  son  was  the  Raja  Bijai 
Bahadur  of  Dattia ;  and  the  adopted  son  of  the  latter  is  the  present  Chief, 
whose  succession  was  disputed  by  Arjun  Singh  (an  illegitimate  son  of  the 
Raja  Bijai  Bahadur),  but  was  enforced  by  British  troops.  The  ancient  title 


112  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

of  the  family  was  Maharaja  Rao  Raja.  In  1865  the  Government  recognised 
the  title  of  Maharaja  as  hereditary  ;  and  on  ist  January  1877,  at  the  Imperial 
Assemblage  at  Delhi,  in  honour  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  the  title  of  Lokindar  was  added.  The  motto 
of  the  family  is  Wir  dalap  Sharandah  ("  Lord  of  the  Brave  Army,  Giver  of 
Refuge").  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  836  square  miles;  its  population 
about  183,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  some  9000  Muhammadans. 
His  Highness  the  Maharaja  maintains  a  military  force  of  945  cavalry,  5203 
infantry,  and  124  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 
Residence. — Dattia,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


DAULAT  RAM,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1883. 
Residence. — Jalandhar,  Punjab. 

DAULAT  SINGH  (of  Kaksis),  Rdjd. 

Born  2nd  October  1830.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  family 
which  is  a  branch  of  the  Kachhwaha  Rajput  clan  from  Lahar,  of  Surajbansi 
origin,  claiming  descent  from  Raja  Dula  Rai  of  Narwar.  His  son  Indarpal 
in  the  year  1033  A.D.  came  to  Indarki  and  Lahar,  and  established  a  branch  of 
the  family  there,  dispossessing  the  Meo  clan.  The  eldest  son  of  Raja  Indarpal 
was  Raja  Bawan  Pal,  who  seized  Rampur  in  1241,  and  reigned  there.  The 
fifth  in  descent  from  Bawan  Pal  was  the  Raja  Aman  Deo,  who  seized  Kaksis 
and  all  the  neighbouring  territory.  His  descendants  suffered  much  from  the 
Bundela  invasion  in  1558;  and  subsequently  from  the  exactions  of  the 
Peshwa  and  Sindhia.  The  head  of  the  family  was  confirmed  in  possession 
of  the  estates  that  remained  to  him  when  the  country  came  under  British 
control  in  1841.  The  Raja  has  a  son  and  heir,  Raghunath  Singh,  aged 
about  thirty-four  years. 

Residence. — Sikri,  Pargana"  Madhogarh,  Jalaun,  North- Western  Provinces. 


DAULATRAI  SAMPATRAJ,  MUNSHI,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 


DATA  KISHAN,  Rai. 

Born  5th  December  1842.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  the  son  of  Rai 
Hingan  Lai,  Kayasth,  formerly  Tahsildar  of  Dehra  Dun  ;  who  had  a  jdgir  and 
the  honorary  title  of  Deputy  Magistrate  and  Collector  conferred  on  him  on 
4th  August  1858,  for  special  services  rendered  to  the  Government  during 
the  Mutiny  in  the  Jaunpur  district.  The  Rai  has  a  son  and  heir  named 
Madan  Makund,  born  25th  February  1865. 

Residence. — Jaunpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  113 


DAYAL  SINGH  (of  Majithia),  Sarddr. 

Born  in  1848  A.D.  The  title  is  hereditary,  derived  originally  from  the 
Sikh  Government,  and  confirmed  by  the  British  Government.  The  family  is 
of  the  Shergil  Jat  tribe.  The  great-grandfather  of  Sardar  Dayal  Singh,  who 
was  named  Jodh  Singh,  was  a  feudal  retainer  of  Sardar  Amar  Singh  Baggah, 
who  possessed  a  large  territory  in  the  district  now  called  Gurdaspur,  and  held 
a  considerable  jdgir.  He  died  in  1788.  His  only  son,  Sardar  Desa  Singh, 
remained  in  the  service  of  the  Baggah  Sardars  till  1809.  He  entered  the 
service  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  on  the  reduction  of  the  Baggah  Sardars, 
and  accompanied  the  Maharaja  in  his  famous  expedition  to  Kangra.  After 
the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas  he  was  appointed  Governor  of  the  Hill  States. 
He  continued  to  perform  -  valuable  service  ;  and  with  his  son,  Sardar  Lahna 
Singh,  received  extensive  grants  from  Ranjit  Singh.  He  died  in  1832,  and 
was  succeeded  in  all  his  estates  and  honours  by  Sardar  Lahna  Singh,  father 
of  the  present  Sardar,  who  received  charge  of  the  hill  territory  between  the 
Ravi  and  the  Sutlej.  He  proved  a  most  capable  Governor ;  but  on  the  rise 
of  Raja  Hira  Singh  to  power,  he  left  the  Punjab  for  a  pilgrimage,  to  avoid 
the  enmity  of  Pandit  Jalla.  After  the  close  of  the  Sutlej  Campaign  he 
returned  to  Lahore  at  the  invitation  of  the  Council  and  the  Resident,  and 
consented  to  join  the  Council.  Subsequently,  however,  foreseeing  further 
troubles,  he  determined  to  leave  the  Punjab;  and  in  January  1848  he  left 
for  Benares,  where  he  died.  He  was  a  skilful  mechanist  and  an  original 
inventor  ;  and  greatly  improved  the  Sikh  ordnance. 

Residence. — Majithia,  Amritsar,  Punjab. 


DAYAL  SINGH  (of  Vadala),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Sialkot,  Punjab. 

DBBI  PARSHAD,  Rai. 

The  title  is  personal ;  was  originally  conferred  by  Carnatic  Nawab,  and 
recognised  December  1890. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Deccan. 

DEBI  PARSHAD,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Central  Provinces. 


DBBI  SINGH  (of  Rajwara),  Rao. 

Born  1860.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  has  come  down  from  ancient 
times.  The  family  is  Bundela  Rajput,  and  is  a  branch  of  that  of  the  Rajas 
of  Chanderi. 

Residence. — Rajwdra,  Lalitpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


114  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DBBI  SINGH,  CHAUDHEI  (of  Asaura),  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  4th  September  1839.  The  title  is  personal ;  and  was  conferred  on 
7th  December  1888,  for  the  Chaudhri's  services  in  connection  with  the 
improvement  of  agriculture. 

Residence. — Meerut,  North-Western  Provinces. 

DEDHROTA,  THAKUR  PUNJAJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1850.     Belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.     The  area  of  the 
State  is  about  10  square  miles  ;  its  population  about  noo. 
Residence. — Dedhrota,  Mdhi  Kcintha,  Bombay. 

DBLAN  SINGH  (of  Kaimori),  Rao. 

Born  1851.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred 
by  Nizam  Shah,  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla.  Rao  Anrudh  Singh,  the  father  of 
Rao  Delan  Singh,  rendered  good  service  to  the  British  Government  during 
the  Mutiny  of  1857. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


DEO,  RAJA  BHIKAM  NARAYAN  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Rdjd  of. 

Succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Maharaja  Sir  Joy  Prakash  Singh  Bahadur 
of  Deo,  K. C.S.I.,  in  1881.  Belongs  to  a  Sesodiya  Rajput  family,  and  claims 
to  be  descended  from  the  ancestors  of  His  Highness  the  Maharana  of 
Udaipur,  through  Raja  Rai  Bhan  Singh  Bahadur.  The  Raja  Fatheh  Narayan 
Singh,  in  1782,  and  again  in  1804,  was  rewarded  by  Government  for  his 
services  with  a  grant  of  land  and  other  honours.  He  was  succeeded  by  his 
son,  Ganesam  Singh,  who  in  1 8 1 6  was  similarly  rewarded  with  the  grant  of  a 
Zaminddri ;  and  the  son  of  the  latter,  Babu  Manti  Bhan  Singh,  rendered 
excellent  service  in  the  Kol  insurrection  of  1831.  Manti  Bhan  Singh  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  Joy  Prakash  Singh,  who  was  conspicuous  for  his  loyalty 
and  faithful  services  during  the  Mutiny  in  1857  ;  and  for  his  laudable  exer- 
tions in  keeping  this  part  of  the  district  in  order,  and  in  quelling  the  insurrec- 
tion in  the  Chutia  Nagpur  division,  he  was  at  first  honoured  with  the  title  of 
Maharaja  Bahadur,  and  then  in  1866  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  His  only  son  is  the  present  Raja 
Bahadur. 

Residence. — Gya,  Bengal. 

DEO  NANDAN  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1891,  "for  his 
high  rank  and  position,  and  public  spirit."  Is  a  younger  son  of  the  late 
Raja  Raghu  Nandan  Singh,  Raja  of  Sheohar,  a  brother  of  the  late  Raja  Sheo 
Nandan  Singh  Bahadur,  and  an  uncle  of  the  present  Raja  of  Sheohar. 

Residence. — Sheohar,  Muzaffarpur,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  115 


DEO  RAO  VINAYAK,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Akola,  Berar. 

DEODAR,  WAGHELA  ANANDSINGH  CHANDAJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 843 ;  succeeded  to  the gadi  in  1888.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu) 
family. 

Residence. — Deodar,  Pdlanpur,  Bombay. 

I 

DEODAR,  WAGHELA  DEWAJI  CHANDAJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1837;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1888.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Deodar,  Pdlanpur,  Bombay. 

DEODAR,  WAGHELA  GAMBHIR  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1834  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  April  1890.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Deodar,  Pdlanpur,  Bombay. 

DEODAR,  WAGHELA  SARDAR  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1853  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  April  1890.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Deodar,  Pdlanpur,  Bombay. 

DERBHAVTI,  RAJA  BHONRAO  RATNU,  Rdjdof.* 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1870.  The  Chief  belongs  to  a  Bhil  (aboriginal)  family.  The  State, 
which  is  one  of  the  Dang  States  in  Khandesh,  contains  an  area  of  about  76 
square  miles,  and  a  population  of  nearly  5000,  chiefly  Bhils  and  Konknas 
(aboriginal  tribes). 

Residence. — Derbhavti,  Khandesh,  Bombay. 

DEROL,  THAKUR  RAMSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born   1853.     Belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.     The  area  of  the 
State  is  about  10  square  miles;  its  population  is  1224,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Derol,  Mahi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


n6  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DBVALIA,  Thdkur  of.     See  Agar. 

DBVBNDRA  NATH  MALLIK,  Kumdr. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  July  1861  ;  the  Kumar 
being  the  eldest  son  of  the  late  Raja  Rajendra  Nath  Mallik.  The  family 
name  is  Sil  ;  but  the  hereditary  title  of  Mallik  having  been  granted  by  the 
old  Mughal  Emperors,  has  been  adopted  as  a  family  name.  The  family  is 
very  ancient ;  its  pedigree  for  twenty  generations  is  in  existence,  and  its  head 
has  long  been  reckoned  the  Dalapati  or  Chief  of  the  Shuvarnavanik  caste, 
and  of  the  Brahmans  of  that  clan.  The  crest  of  the  family  is  an  oval  star 
enclosing  a  lion. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

DBVBNDRA  NATH  SAHAI  DEO,  Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  conferred  by  the  Maharaja  of 
Chota  Nagpur,  and  confirmed  on  23rd  December  1872.  The  family  is  a 
younger  branch  of  that  of  the  Rajas  of  Chota  Nagpur,  and  is  said  to  be 
descended  from  the  pandrik  nag  or  sacred  Serpent ;  its  cognisance  or 
crest  is  a  cobra  with  a  human  face  under  the  expanded  hood. 

Residence. — Lohdrdaga,  Bengal. 

DEWA  SINGH  (of  Bahrain),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Jdlandhar,  Punjab. 

DBWAS,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  KRISHNAJI  RAO  PUAR, 

Rdjd  of  (Senior  Branch). 

"Bdbd  Saheb." 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  November  1849  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i8th  March  1861.  Belongs, 
with  His  Highness  the  Raja  of  Dewas  of  the  Junior  Branch  (who  is  called 
the  "  Dada  Saheb "),  to  a  Puar  Rajput  family,  descended  from  a  common 
ancestor  with  the  Raja  of  Dhar.  The  Raja  Kaluji  had  two  sons,  Tukaji  and 
Jiwaji,  and  these  sons  received  from  Baji  Rao  Peshwa  the  grant  of  the  Dewas 
State  in  common — the  descendants  of  Raja  Tukaji  being  known  as  the  Senior 
Branch  or  "  Baba  Saheb."  Tukaji  was  succeeded  by  Krishnaji,  and  the  latter 
by  Tukaji  II.,  who  adopted  Rukmangad  Rao,  commonly  known  as  Khasi 
Saheb.  He  succeeded  Tukaji  II.  in  1824;  and,  dying  in  1860,  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  adopted  son,  the  present  Chief. 

The  two  Rajas  of  Dewas,  Senior  Branch  and  Junior  Branch  (or  Baba 
Saheb  and  Dada  Saheb),  reside  in  different  palaces  in  the  same  town  of 
Dewas  ;  but  the  rule  of  each  Chief  is  distinct  within  his  own  limits.  Both 
Chiefs  rendered  good  service  during  the  Mutiny. 

The  area  of  the  territories  under  the  rule  of  the  Baba  Saheb  is  155  square 
miles;  population  about  73,940,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  nearly  8000 
Muhammadans.  His  Highness  the  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  70 
cavalry,  594  infantry,  and  14  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 

Residence. — Dewds,  Indore,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  117 


DEWAS,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  NARAYAN  RAO  PUAR, 
Rdjd  of  (Junior  Branch). 

"Dddd  Saheb." 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  2oth  December  1860;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  8th  August  1864. 
Belongs,  with  His  Highness  the  Raja  of  Dewas  of  the  Senior  Branch  (who  is 
called  the  "  Baba  Saheb),  to  a  Puar  Rajput  family,  descended  from  a  common 
ancestor  with  the  Raja  of  Dhar.  The  Raja  Kaluji  had  two  sons,  Tukaji  and 
Jiwaji,  and  these  sons  received  from  Baji  Rao  Peshwa  the  grant  of  the  Dewas 
State  in  common — the  descendants  of  Raja  Jiwaji  being  known  as  the  Junior 
Branch  or  "Dada  Saheb."  Jiwaji  adopted  Anand  Rao  Puar,  who,  in  1837, 
adopted  Haibat  Rao,  who  succeeded  him.  The  latter  died  in  1864  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  Raja. 

The  two  Rajas  of  Dewas,  Senior  Branch  and  Junior  Branch  (or  Baba 
Saheb  and  Dada  Saheb),  reside  in  different  palaces  in  the  same  town  of 
Dewas,  but  the  rule  of  each  Chief  is  distinct  within  his  own  limits.  Both* 
Chiefs  rendered  good  service  during  the  Mutiny. 

The  area  of  the  territories  under  the  rule  of  the  Dada  Saheb  is  134 
square  miles;  population  68,222,  chiefly  Hindus,' but  including  nearly  7000 
Muhammadans.  His  Highness  the  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  79 
cavalry,  166  infantry,  and  6  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 

Residence. — Dew£s,  Indore,  Central  India. 


DEY,  KANNY  LALL,  C.I.E.,  Rai  Bahadur.     See  Kanhai  Lai  De. 


DHABLA  DHIR  and  KAKARKHERI,  THAKUR  CHAND 
SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1836  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1871.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family.  The  State,  which  is  in  the  Bhopal  Agency,  contains  an 
area  of  about  10  square  miles,  and  an  estimated  population  of  about  1000, 
chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Shujdwalpur,  Bhopd.1,  Central  India. 

DHABLA  GHOSI,  THAKUR  GOPAL  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1820;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1854.     The  population  of 
his  State  (which  is  in  the  Bhopal  Agency)  is  about  400,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Shujdwalpur,  Bhopdl,  Central  India. 

DHAKJI  KASHINATHJI,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Bombay. 


ii8  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

DHAMASIA,  THAKUR  KALUBAWA,  Thdkurof. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1834.     Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Muhammadan)  family.     The  area  of 
the  State  is  about  5  miles ;  its  population  is  chiefly  Bhil  (aborigines). 
Residence. — Dhamasia,  Rewd  Kantha,  Bombay. 

DHAMI,  RANA  FATBH  SINGH,  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1855;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  26th  January  1870.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  whose  founder,  on  the  invasion  of  India  by  Shahab- 
ud-din  Ghori  in  the  i4th  century,  fled  from  Rajpura  in  the  Ambala  dis- 
trict, and  conquered  the  territory  of  Dhami.  The  State  was  formerly  a 
feudatory  of  Bilaspur,  but  was  made  directly  dependent  on  the  British  Power 
on  the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas  by  the  latter  in  1815.  The  sanad  recognis- 
jng  the  Rana  is  dated  4th  September  1815.  The  present  Rana  succeeded 
the  Rana  Govardhan  Singh  in  1870.  The  area  of  the  State  is  29  square 
miles ;  its  population  about  3300,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a 
military  force  of  60  infantry. 

Residence. — Dhami,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 

DHANJIBHAI  FAKIRJI  COMMODORE,  Khan  Bahadur. 
Created  a  Khan  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Marri,  Punjab. 

DHANJISHA  EDALJI  MANA,  Khan  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  29th  June  1886. 
Residence. — Kardchi,  Sind. 

DHANJISHA  HORMASJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Kathiawar,  Bombay. 

DHANPAT  RAI,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  recognised  on  9th  December  1864. 
Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

DHANPAT  RAI,  Rat  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Peshawar,  Punjab. 

DHANPAT  SINGH  DUGAR  (of  Baluchar),  Rai  Bahadur. 
Born  1841.     The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i3th  December 
1866.     The  Rai  Bahadur,  son  of  the  late  Pratap  Singh  Dugar  of  the  Oswal 
caste,  is  a  leading  man  among  the  Jains,  and  has  founded  many  Dharmsalas 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  119 

for  the  use  .of  his  co-religionists  in  various  parts  of  India,  and  published  and 
distributed  the  Jain  sacred  books.  He  is  a  banker  and  manufacturer,  having 
houses  in  most  of  the  great  cities  of  Bengal,  and  has  been  distinguished  for 
his  liberality  and  public  spirit.  He  has  been  twice  married,  and  has  three 
sons — Babu  Ganpat  Singh  and  Babu  Narpat  Singh  by  the  first  wife,  and 
Babu  Maharaj  Bahadur  Singh  by  the  second.  Is  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 
The  family  emigrated  about  150  years  ago  from  Kishengarh  in  Rajputana, 
and  settled  at  Baluchar  and  Azimganj,  in  the  district  of  Murshidabad, 
Bengal. 

Residence. — Azimganj  and  Baluchar,  Murshidabad,  Bengal. 


DHAR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  SIR  ANAND  RAO 
PUAR,  K.C.S.I.,  C.I.B.,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  8th  April  1844;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2ist  November  1864. 
Belongs  (with  their  Highnesses  the  Rajas  of  Dewas,  Senior  and  Junior 
Branch)  to  the  great  Puar  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  said  to  be  descended  from 
the  famous  Hindu  legendary  heroes,  King  Vikramaditya  and  Raja  Bhoj. 
Raja  Bhoj  is  said  to  have  been  the  first  Puar  to  come  to  Dhar.  About  the 
year  1730  Anand  Rao  Puar,  Raja  of  Dhar,  was  acknowledged  by  the  Peshwa, 
Baji  Rao,  to  be  the  head  of  the  Puars.  One  of  the  great  historical  Prin- 
cesses of  India,  celebrated  for  her  courage  and  abilities,  and  the  determina- 
tion with  which  she  resisted  the  attacks  of  Sindhia  and  Holkdr,  was  the  Rani 
Mina  Bai,  widow  of  Anand  Rao  II.,  who  was  the  great-grandson  of  his 
namesake.  The  Rani  was  succeeded  by  her  adopted  son,  Raja  Ramchandra 
Puar,  who  adopted  Jeswant  Rao,  the  half-brother  of  the  present  Raja.  Raja 
Jeswant  Rao  died  in  1857,  and  the  State  was  confiscated  for  rebellion 
during  the  Mutiny,  but  it  was  restored  in  1864  to  the  present  Raja,  who  was 
then  a  minor.  The  title  of  Viswas  Rao  ("  Faithful ")  is  said  to  have  been 
conferred  on  this  family  by  the  Maharajas  of  Satara,  as  the  descendants  of 
Sivaji  and  the  heads  of  the  Mahratta  Empire,  but  it  has  not  been  recognised 
in  recent  years.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  1740  square  miles,  and  it 
has  many  feudatories.  The  population  is  about  148,000,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  about  12,000  Muhammadans  and  about  19,000  aborigines. 
The  present  Raja  has  been  granted  the  title  of  Maharaja  as  a  personal  dis- 
tinction, and  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1883  ;  he  had  been  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  on  ist  January  1877,  on  tne  occasion 
of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  His 
Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  367  cavalry,  1249  infantry,  and  5 
guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 5  guns. 

Residence. — Dhdr,  Bhopawar,  Central  India. 


DHARAM  NARAYAN,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Ambala,  Punjab. 


120  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

DHARAM  NARAYAN  PANDIT,  C.I.E.,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i5th  February  1860. 
Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 

DHARAM  SINGH  (of  Bichuri),   Sardar. 

Born  1857.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  of  Manjha, 
Punjab.  Sardar  Dargaha  Singh  acquired  considerable  territory  by  conquest 
in  1759  A.D.,  but  his  descendants  were  deprived  of  the  largest  portion  of 
their  estates  by  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh.  The  grandson  of  the  Sardar 
Dargaha  Singh  was  Sardar  Dewa  Singh,  who  was  the  father  of  the  present 
Sardar. 

Residence. — Bichuri,  Jcilandhar,  Punjab. 

DHARAMPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARANA  SHRI 
NARAYANDEVJI  RAMDEVJI,  Rdjd  of. 

Born  3rd  September  1840;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2oth  January  1860. 
Belongs  to  the  Solar  race  of  Udaipur,  and  is  consequently  a  Sesodiya  Rajput. 
His  Highness's  ancestors  have  borne  the  title  of  Maharana  from  time  imme- 
morial. They  were  the  Rajas  of  the  Surat  district  when  the  British  first 
came  to  the  country,  and  have  always  been  recognised  by  the  Paramount 
Power.  His  Highness  has  four  sons — Shri  Dharamdevji,  Shri  Mohandevji, 
Shri  Haridevji,  and  Shri  Baldevji.  His  banner  bears  a  golden-yellow  sun  in 
the  centre  of  the  field,  in  virtue  of  his  descent  from  "  the  Sun  of  the  Hindus," 
the  Udaipur  Chief.  Has  two  grandsons,  also  several  daughters  and  grand- 
daughters ;  and  has  received  a  sanad  guaranteeing  him  the  privilege  of  adop- 
tion. The  area  of  the  State  is  794  square  miles;  its  population  about 
102,000,  chiefly  Hindus.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  40 
cavalry,  171  infantry,  and  4  guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Dharampur,  Surat,  Bombay. 

DHARMA  RAO  NAYADU,  R.,  Rao  Bahddur. 

Born  1857;  appointed  Deputy  Collector  in  1869;  Assistant  Commis- 
sioner of  Salt  Revenue  in  1880;  granted  the  personal  title  of  Rao  Bahadur 
in  1890. 

Residence. — Cocanada,  GodaVari  District,  Madras. 

DHARMRAJ  KUNWAR  (of  Parhat  and  Rajabazar),  Rdni. 

Born  1854;  succeeded  her  late  husband,  the  Raja  Mahesh  Narayan  of 
Rajabazar,  on  nth  October  1878.  The  family  are  Raghubansi  Rajputs, 
whose  founder  came  from  Kaliangarh  Sawain,  and  acquired  the  territories  of 
Rajabazar.  The  neighbouring  Rajas  conferred  the  title  of  Raja  by  tilak 
some  200  or  300  years  ago,  and  the  late  Raja  was  the  seventh  who  had 
borne  the  title.  He  was  Raja  of  Parhat,  in  the  district  of  Partabgarh,  Oudh, 
as  well  as  of  Rajabazar ;  and  was  an  Honorary  Magistrate  both  in  Oudh  and 
in  the  North- Western  Provinces. 

Residence. — Ra"ja"baza>,  Garwdra,  Jaunpur  District,  North- Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  121 


DHARNANDA,  THAKUR  BHIM  SINGH, 

Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  December 
1887.  Belongs  to  a  Chauhan  Rajput  (Hindu) 
family,  descended  from  Thakur  Chhatar  Sal,  who 
was  recognised  by  the  British  Government  in 
I843-  The  population  of  the  State  is  about 

in  the  seal  and  for  signature.         5OOO,   chiefly  Hindus. 
(A  circle  with  four  Trisulas  or  _,      .  ,  _..  ._,..  _, 

Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car-  Residence. — Dharnanda,  Gwalior,  Central  India. 

dinal  points.) 

DHARUP  SINGH,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  ancestor  of  this  family,  Rao  Kehari  Singh, 
did  good  service  with  Sultan  Muhammad,  Nawab  of  Rahatgarh,  in  return  for 
which  he  received  the  title  and  considerable  grants.  The  father  of  the 
present  Rao  Saheb  was  the  Rao  Jag  Raj  Singh. 

Residence. — S£gar,  Central  Provinces. 

DHAUKAL  PARSHAD,  MUNSHI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  27th  February  1828.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
2nd  January  1888.  Belongs  to  a  Kanungo  family  of  Pargand  Karsoli,  and 
rendered  good  service  to  Government  during  the  Mutiny.  Is  an  Honorary 
Magistrate. 

Residence. — Mainpuri,  North- Western  Provinces. 

DHBNKANAL,  RAJA  SURA  PRATAP  MAHINDRA 
BAHADUR,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1884;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  2Qth  August  1885. 
The  family  are  Kshatriya  Hindus,  and  were  anciently  feudatories  of  the 
old  Rajas  of  Orissa ;  said  to  have  been  founded  by  Harihar  Samant  Singhar, 
who  established  himself  in  Dhenkanal  after  killing  the  aboriginal  Raja 
Dhenka,  from  whom  the  State  derives  its  modern  name.  The  titles  of 
Samant,  Singhar ;  Brahmarbar  were  conferred  on  the  family  by  the  old  Rajas 
of  Orissa.  Subsequently  the  title  of  Mahindra  Bahadur  was  conferred  by 
the  Mahrattas,  who  also  recognised  the  title  of  Raja,  which  finally  was  con- 
ferred on  the  predecessor  of  the  present  Chief  by  the  Government  of  India 
in  1874.  The  family  crest  and  seal  is  the  minaketana,  a  flag  bearing  the 
emblem  of  the  sacred  fish.  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the 
Orissa  Tributary  Mahals,  is  1463  square  miles;  its  population  about  208,316, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  about  80,000  Savars  and  other  aboriginal 
tribesmen.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  343  infantry  and  8  guns. 
Residence. — Dhenkanal,  Orissa,  Bengal. 

DHIRAJ  KARAN,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January 
1893. 

Residence. — Monghyr,  Bengal.  • 


122  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DHOLPUR,  His  Highness  the  Mahdrdj  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1862  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadt  as  a  minor  9th  February  1873.  The 
full  titles  of  this  Chief  are — Major  His  Highness  Rais-ud-daula"  Sipahdar-ul- 
Mulk,  Maharaj-Adhiraj  Sri  Sawai  Maharaj  Rana  Nihal  Singh,  Lokindar  Baha- 
dur, Diler  Jang,  Jai  Deo.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  (Hindu)  family,  which  traces  its 
pedigree  back  to  the  nth  century,  when  it  held  lands  under  the  Puar  Kings 
of  Delhi.  In  later  times  it  acquired  territory  on  the  banks  of  the  Chambal, 
and  was  powerful  in  the  i8th  century,  when  the  Rana  of  Gohad,  ancestor  of 
the  present  Maharaj  Rana,  joined  the  British  troops  in  the  Mahratta  war  in 
1779.  The  title  of  Rana  had  been  recognised  by  the  Emperor  Sikandar 
Lodi  of  Delhi,  but  in  1779  the  British  recognised  the  Rana  as  Maharaj 
Rana.  '  In  1805  Lord  Cornwallis  granted  Gohad  to  Sindhia,  and  in  exchange 
granted  to  the  Maharaj  Rana  Kirat  Singh  (ancestor  of  the  present  Chief)  the 
territories  of  Dholpur,  Bari,  and  Rajakhera.  Kirat  Singh  was  succeeded  by 
Bhagwant  Singh,  who  showed  great  loyalty  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and 
was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of 
India.  His  son  married  a  daughter  of  the  late  Raja  of  Patiala,  but  died 
before  his  father,  leaving  a  son  and  heir,  the  present  Maharaj  Rana,  who 
succeeded  his  grandfather  in  1873.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1200  square 
miles;  its  population  about  250,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  18,000 
Muhammadans  and  2500  Jains.  The  Maharaj  Rana  maintains  a  military 
force  of  139  cavalry,  1588  infantry,  and  32  guns.  His  Highness  is  an 
Honorary  Major  in  the  British  army,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 
The  family  colour  was  azure,  but  in  an  encounter  towards  the  end  of  the  last 
century  the  then  Chief  captured  from  the  Thakurs  of  Bamraoli  a  golden- 
yellow  flag,  with  a  figure  of  Hanuman  (the  monkey-god)  in  the  centre  of  the 
field,  and  this  has  been  subsequently  adopted  as  the  family  cognisance. 

Arms. — Or,  a  "  Hanuma"n  "  gules,  on  a  chief  azure  a  sword  between  two 
towers  or.  Supporters. — Two  Rajput  warriors  in  full  armour.  Crest. — 
A  "  Narsinghji  "  (man-lion)  proper.  Motto. — Mitra  Mitra,  Amitra  Amitra 
("  Sure  friend,  sure  foe.") 

Residence. — Dholpur,  Rajputdna. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  123 


DHRANGADRA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SIR  MANSINGHJI 
RANMALSINGHJI,  K.C.S.I.,  Raj  Saheb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  nth  January  1837  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  death  of  his 
father,  His  late  Highness  the  Raj  Saheb  Ranmalsinghji,  K.C.S.I.,  on  28th 
October  1869.  Is  the  head  of  the  Jhala  Rajputs,  and  the  Chief  of  this 
family  has  consequently  long  held  the  title  of  Raj  Saheb,  while  the  title  of 
"  Maharana  "  is  commonly  used  by  the  Jhala  clansmen  of  their  chief,  and  it 
is  also  commonly  used  as  the  vernacular  equivalent  of  "  His  Highness,"  the 
title  conferred  by  the  Queen  Empress.  The  Jhala  Rajputs  are  said  to  have 
entered  Kathiawar  from  Sind  in  the  8th  century  A.D.,  and  the  founder  of  this 
dynasty  is  stated  to  have  been  Harapal  Devji,  who  obtained  from  the 
Solankhi  Rajput  Chief  of  Patan  the  grant  of  the  district  subsequently  known 
as  Jhalawar  in  Kathiawar.  It  may  be  noted  that  the  State  of  Jhalawar  in 
Rajputana  was  founded  in  the  beginning  of  the  i8th  century  A.D.  by  Jhala 
emigrants  from  Kathiawar.  His  Highness's  ancestors — from  whom  also 
descend  the  Chiefs  of  Wankaner,  Limri,  Wadhwan,  Chura,  Sayla,  ano!  Than- 
Lakhtar —  were  settled  first  at  Patri  in  Ahmadabad;  then  at  Halwad  in 
Kathiawar;  and  finally  at  Dhrangadra.  Sir  Mansinghji  has  been  dis- 
tinguished for  the  enlightened  character  of  his  administration,  especially  in 
the  matters  of  public  instruction  and  internal  communications.  He  has 
established  an  efficient  girls'  school  at  Dhrangadra,  and  many  good  schools 
throughout  the  State ;  and  has  constructed  many  good  roads,  and  other 
public  works.  To  commemorate  the  visit  of  His  Royal  Highness  the  Duke 
of  Edinburgh  to  Bombay  in  1870  His  Highness  contributed  a  large  sum 
towards  the  erection  of  a  Dharmsdla  at  Rajkot ;  and  his  loyalty  was  still 
more  conspicuously  displayed  on  the  occasion  of  the  landing  of  His  Royal 
Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales  at  Bombay  in  1875,  which  was  celebrated  by 
the  erection  and  endowment  of  the  Albert  Edward  Hospital  at  Dhrangadra. 
His  Highness  was  prevented  by  serious  illness  from  attending  the  Imperial 
Assemblage  at  Delhi  on  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India,  but  he  was  on  that  occasion  created  a  Knight  Com- 
mander of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  and  received  the 
addition  of  four  guns  to  his  salute  as  a  personal  distinction.  When  he  was 
presented  with  the  insignia  of  the  Star  of  India,  at  the  same  time  as  His 
Highness  the  Jam  of  Nauanagar,  the  Political  Agent,  speaking  for  the 
Government,  said  :  "  His  Highness  the  Raj  Saheb  of  Dhrangadra  commands 
respect  as  the  head,  both  of  the  Jhala  tribe  and  of  a  ruling  house  second  to 
none  in  domestic  virtue.  He  now  accedes  to  the  honours  enjoyed  by  his 
father,  Sir  Ranmalsinghji,  the  worthy  son  of  a  worthy  sire.  The  decorations 
granted  to  these  princes  are  the  natural  ornaments  of  exalted  hereditary  rank." 
Much  sympathy  was  felt  for  His  Highness  when,  in  1879,  he  lost  his  eldest 
son  and  heir,  the  late  Rajkumar  Jaswantsinghji,  whose  son  (the  grandson  of 
the  present  Chief)  is  now  the  heir-apparent  to '  the  gadi.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  1156  square  miles;  its  population  about  100,000,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  about  6000  Muhammadans.  The  Raj  Saheb  maintains  a 
military  force  of  103  cavalry,  470  infantry,  and  9  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  15  guns. 

Residence. — Dhra"ngadra,  Ka"thia"wa"r. 


I24  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DHROL,  THAKUR  SAHBB  HARISINGHJI  JAISINGHJI, 

Thdkur  Saheb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1846;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Thakur  Saheb  Jesinghji,  26th 
October  1886.  Is  a  Jareja  Rajput,  descended  from  a  brother  of  Jam  Rawal, 
the  first  Jam  of  Nauanagar,  who  founded  that  State  in  1542  A.D;  and  the 
family  is  also  the  same  as  that  of  His  Highness  the  Maharao  Raja  of  Kutch. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  about  283  square  miles;  its  population  is  about 
22,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  nearly  3000  Muhammadans.  The 
Thakur  Saheb  maintains  a  military  force  of  25  cavalry,  285  infantry,  and  6 
guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Dhrol,  Kdthia'wa'r,  Bombay. 

DHULATIA,  THAKUR  FATBH  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1866  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1872.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Dhulatia,  Western  Malwa",  Central  India. 

DHURWAI,  DIWAN  RANJOR  SINGH,  Jdgirddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1833  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i4th  January  1851.  Belongs 
to  a  Bundela  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  the  Raja  Bir  Singh  Deo 
of  Orchha.  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the  Hashtbhai  jdgirs^  is 
about  1 8  square  miles;  its  population  is  about  1600,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Jagirdar  maintains  a  military  force  of  10  cavalry,  100  infantry,  and  3  guns. 

Residence. — Dhurwai,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

DILAWAR  SINGH  (of  Tilokpur),  Midn. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Ka"ngra,  Punjab. 

DINA  NATH,  PANDIT,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893,  for  eminent 
service  in  the  Police. 

Residence. — Central  Provinces. 

DINABANDHU  NYAYARATNA,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887  for 
eminence  in  oriental  learning,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her 
Majesty's  reign.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after 
titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Konnagar,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  125 

DINANATH  GHOSH,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  nth  December  1884. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

DINENDRA  NARAYAN  RAI,  Kumdr. 

Honorary  Magistrate  and  Municipal  Commissioner  of  Calcutta.     Granted 
the  title  of  Kumar,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Calcutta. 

DINKAR  RAO,  SIR,  K.C.S.I.,  Rdjd  Mushir-i-Khas  Bahddur. 

Born  1819.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Raja  comes  of  an  ancient 
Dakhani  family  of  the  Bombay  Presidency,  but  usually  resides  in  Agra, 
Cawnpur,  or  Benares,  in  the  North -Western  Provinces.  Was  Minister  of 
His  late  Highness  the  Maharaja  Sindhia  of  Gwalior  till  1859  :  subsequently 
became  Superintendent  of  the  Dholpur  State,  and  was  a  Member  of  the 
Baroda  Commission.  The  Raja  was  created  in  1866  a  Knight  Commander 
of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  At  the  Imperial  Assemblage 
at  Delhi,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty 
as  Empress  of  India,  he  received  the  title  of  Raja  Mushir-i-Khas  Bahadur  as 
a  personal  distinction,  and  on  28th  August  1884  this  was  declared  hereditary. 
His  son  and  heir  is  named  Raghunath  Rao  Dinkar,  born  4th  August  1858. 

Residence. — Agra,  North- Western  Provinces. 

DINSHA  DOSABHAI  KHAMBATTA,  Khdn  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  August  1881. 
Residence. — Disa,  Bombay. 

DIWAN  CHAND,  RaL 

Born  1835.  The  only  son  of  Diwan  Ganpat  Rai;  who  was  in  favour 
with  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh,  appointed  by  him  tutor  of  his  grandson,  and 
rewarded  by  the  grant  of  a  jdgir  and  the  appointment  of  Hazurnavis. 
Descended  from  a  family  whose  ancestor,  Gaggan  Mai,  was  distinguished,  in 
the  time  of  the  Emperor  Akbar,  as  the  founder  of  Ghartal  in  Sialkot,  and 
obtained  the  title  of  Malik.  His  grandsons,  Diwan  Ramji  Mai  and  Shamji 
Mai,  earned  the  title  of  Diwan  in  the  time  of  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb  ;  Ramji 
Mai  was  appointed  Hazurnavis,  and  Shamji  obtained  a  command  in  the 
Kabul  army.  The  family  left  Ghartal  for  Jammu,  and  subsequently  for  Dera 
Nanak  ;  but  Diwan  Nand  Gopal,  the  grandfather  of  Rai  Diwan  Chand, 
returned  to  the  ancestral  home.  His  son  was  Diwan  Ganpat  Rai  mentioned 
above,  who  was  appointed  by  the  Maharaja  Sher  Singh  officer  in  charge  of 
the  magazines.  He  was  a  brave  soldier,  and  fought  in  the  battles  of  Pesha- 
war, Multan,  and  Dera  Ismail  Khan;  and  throughout  the  rebellions  of  1847 
and  1848  attached  himself  to  the  British  Resident.  The  Rai  Diwan  Chand 
was  for  some  time  Tahsildar  of  Roras  in  Wazirabad  ;  has  subsequently  been 
an  able  and  successful  journalist  and  author,  as  well  as  distinguished  in 


126  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

municipal  and  university  work,  and  is  Vice-President  of  the  Punjab  Press 
Association.  Received  the  title  on  24th  May  1889.  Has  two  sons,  Munshi 
Brij  Lai  and  Munshi  Gayan  Chand.  • 

Residence. — Sidlkot,  Punjab. 

DIWAN  MUHAMMAD,  SAYYID,  Khan  Saheb. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893,  for  eminent 
services  in  the  post  of  Mir  Munshi  of  the  British  Agency  at  Kabul. 
Residence. — Kharar,  Ambala,  Punjab. 

DODA  KHAN,  Mulk. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — S  ind . 

DOSABHAI  FRAMJI  KARAKA,  C.S.I. 

A  distinguished  citizen  and  official  of  Bombay,  late  Collector  of  Bombay 
and  Chairman  of  the  Justices.  Created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 

DOSABHAI  PBSTANJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Surat,  B ombay . 

DOST  ALI  KHAN  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  descended  from  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

DOST  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb. 
The  title  is  personal. 
Residence. — Tajpur,  Sind. 

DOST  MUHAMMAD  walad  WALIDAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  descended  from  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shika"rpur,  Sind. 

DOTRIA.     See  Bhaisola. 

DRUG  SINGH  (of  Sarekha),  Thdkur. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary  ;  and  is  stated  to  have  been  originally 
conferred  by  the  Gond  Rajas,  Harade  Shah  and  Nizam  Shah  of  Mandla. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  127 

The  family  is  Gond  (aboriginal),  and  is  descended  from  Thakur  Bhik  Rai ; 
whose  grandson,  Thakur  Ranju  Singh,  was  father  of  Thakur  Prithi  Singh,  and 
grandfather  of  the  present  Thakur.     Thakur  Drug  Singh  has  three  sons — 
Thakur  Jai  Singh,  Deo  Singh,  and  Sardar  Singh. 
<  Residence. — Seoni,  Central  Provinces. 

DUDHPUB,  THAKUR  ANUPBAWA  DADABAWA,  Thakur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1878;  succeeded  to  \hegadi  i8th  November  1888.  Belongs  to 
a  Rajput  (Muhammadan)  family. 

Residence. — Dudhpur,  Rewd  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

DUGRI,  MIAN  KHUDA  BAKSH,  Mian  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  about  1854  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  December  1883.  Belongs 
to  a  Pindari  (Muhammadan)  family. 

Residence. — Dugri,  Bhopdl,  Central  India. 

DUJANA,  JALAL-UD-DAULA  NAWAB  MUHAMMAD  MUM- 
TAZ  ALI  KHAN  BAHADUR  MUSTAKIL,  JANG,  Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1864  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i5th  October  1879,  on  tne  death  of 
the  late  Nawab  Muhammad  Saadat  AH  Khan.  The  Nawab  belongs  to  an 
Afghan  (Muhammadan)  family ;  whose  founder,  Abdus  Samand  Khan,  with 
his  sons,  obtained  the  grant  of  large  estates  from  Lord  Lake  as  a  reward  for 
service  rendered.  The  tenure  was  made  hereditary,  and  other  territories 
added,  by  a  sanad  dated  4th  May  1806.  The  Nawab  Abdus  Samand  Khan 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  Dunde  Khan,  and  he  by  the  Nawab  Hasan  AH 
Khan,  who  was  the  father  of  the  late  Nawab  Muhammad  Saadat  AH  Khan. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  89  square  miles;  its  population  23,416,  chiefly 
Hindus,  but  including  nearly  6000  Muhammadans.  The  Nawab  maintains 
a  military  force  of  25  cavalry  and  140  infantry. 

Residence. — Dujdna,  Rohtak,  Punjab. 

DULAM  SINGH  (of  Piparia),  Thakur. 

Born  1850.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Thakur  is  a  grandson  of 
Thakur  Ananta  Singh,  who  was  a  brother  of  Thakur  Prithi  Singh,  the  father 
of  Thakur  Drug  Singh  of  Sarekha  (see  above).  The  title  was  originally 
derived  from  the  Gond  Rajas  of  Mandla. 

Residence.- — Seoni,  Central  Provinces. 

DUMRAON,  MAHARAJA  SIR  RADHA  PRASAD  SINGH 
BAHADUR,  K.O.I.B.,  Mahdrdjd  of. 

Born  i4th  August  1841.  Belongs  to  an  ancient  Kshatriya  (Hindu) 
family,  claiming  descent  from  the  Raja  Vikramaditya  of  Malwa,  through  the 
Raja  Bhoj  Singh,  who  founded  the  ancient  Hindu  city  of  Bhojpur,  the  ruins 


128  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

of  which  are  distant  about  one  mile  from  Dumraon,  in  the  district  of  Shah- 
abad.  One  of  the  descendants  of  Raja  Bhoj  Singh  was  Narayan  Mai,  on 
whom  it  is  said  that  the  Mughal  Emperor  Jahangir  conferred  the  title  of 
Raja  in  the  year  1604  A.D.  ;  and  his  son,  grandson,  and  great-grandson  in 
turn  received  the  same  title.  The  last-named  was  the  Raja  Haril  Singh,  who 
in  the  year  1720  A. D.  received  from  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah  the  title  of 
Raja,  extensive  grants  of  land,  and  the  command  of  1000  infantry  and  800 
cavalry.  His  son  was  the  Raja  Chhatardhari  Singh,  who  also  obtained  the 
same  title  and  further  grants  from  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah  in  1746 
A.D.  Chhatardhari's  son  was  the  Raja  Vikramaditya  Singh,  who  received  his 
title  in  1771  A.D.  from  the  Emperor  Shah  Alam,  and  subsequently  obtained 
a  confirmation  thereof  and  sundry  grants  from  the  British  Government.  His 
son,  Jai  Prakas  Singh,  seems  to  have  obtained  the  title  of  Maharaja  from  the 
Marquess  of  Hastings  in  1 8 1 6.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  grandson,  Janaki 
Prasad  Singh,  who  died  whilst  a  minor ;  and  the  latter  in  turn  was  followed 
by  his  uncle,  the  late  Maharaja  Maheshwar  Bakhsh  Singh  (father  of  the 
present  Maharaja),  who  was  a  younger  son  of  the  Raja  Jai  Prakas  Singh, 
born  2oth  October  1803,  and  succeeded  to  the  Raj  in  1844.  The  Maharaja 
Maheshwar  Bakhsh  Singh  took  a  leading  part  in  the  reception  of  His  Royal 
Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales ;  and  was  honoured  with  the  gift  of  a  portrait- 
medal  from  His  Royal  Highness,  and  a  letter  of  acknowledgment  of  his 
services.  He  was  reported  to  stand  conspicuous  for  his  loyalty  and  liberality 
on  all  occasions,  and  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  Dying  in  1881,  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
the  present  Maharaja  Radha  Prasad  Singh  Bahadur.  The  latter  had  been 
created  a  Raja  during  the  lifetime  of  his  father,  for  good  service  rendered 
during  the  great  famine  of  1873-74;  and  he  had  also  been  honoured  by 
receiving  a  portrait-medal  from  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales, 
and  a  letter  of  acknowledgment  for  services  rendered  in  the  reception  of  His 
Royal  Highness.  On  succeeding  his  father  he  received  the  title  of  Maharaja 
Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction,  i3th  January  1882. 
Residence. — Dumraon,  Shdhabad,  Bengal. 


DUN,  MATING-,  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence.  — Katha,  B  urma. 

DUNJ  SHBTAN  (of  Spiti),  Nona  of  Spiti. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Nono  being  the  descendant  of  the  Tibetan 
Chiefs,  formerly  feudatories  of  Ladakh  in  Tibet.  Since  the  conclusion  of 
the  first  Sikh  war  in  1846,  Spiti  has  been  an  outlying  subdivision  of  the 
Himalayan  district  of  Kangra,  Punjab ;  and  is  administered  by  British 
officials  with  the  aid  of  the  Nono,  who  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate.  The 
population  of  the  valley — which  is  covered  by  deep  snow  every  year  from 
December  to  April — is  hardly  3000,  almost  entirely  Tibetan  in  race. 

Residence. — Spiti,  Kdngra,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  129 


DUNGARPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAWAL  UDAI  SINGH 
BAHADUR,  Mahdrdwal  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  22nd  May  1839  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  September  1846. 
Is  a  Sesodia  Rajput,  descended  from  a  branch  of  the  ruling  family  of 
Udaipur,  the  "  Sun  of  the  Hindus."  The  Maharawals  of  Dungarpur  were 
ributary,  from  time  to  time,  to  the  Mughal  Emperors  of  Delhi  and  to  the 
Mahrattas ;  from  whom  they  were  finally  rescued  by  the  British  Power, 
a  treaty  being  concluded  in  1 8 1 8.  The  Bhils  were  reduced  to  submission  ; 
and  in  1825  the  Maharawal  Jaswant  Singh,  being  found  incompetent,  was 
deposed  by  the  Government,  and  his  adopted  son  Dalpat  Singh,  second  son 
of  the  Chief  of  Partabgarh,  appointed  to  succeed.  Subsequently  the 
Maharawal  Dalpat  Singh  succeeded  to  the  gadi  of  Partabgarh  ;  so  the  British 
Government  permitted  him  to  adopt  the  present  Maharawal  (then  a  minor) 
to  succeed  him  in  Dungarpur.  The  Maharawal  has  a  son  and  heir,  the 
Maharaj  Kunwar  Khuman  Singh.  The  distinctive  family  colour  is  red. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  about  1000  square  miles;  its  population  about 
154,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  3609  Muhammadans  and  67,000 
Bhils  (aborigines).  His  Highness  the  Maharawal  maintains  a  military  force 
of  251  cavalry,  535  infantry,  and  8  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of 
15  guns. 

Residence. — Dungarpur,  Rdjputdna. 

DUR  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  KHAGWANI,  Bahadur 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  nth  March  1859. 
Residence. — Dera  Ismail  KMn,  Punjab. 

DURGA  CHARAN  LAHA,  C.I.B.,  Maharaja. 

Born  23rd  November  1822.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred 
on  3oth  May  1891.  The  Maharaja,  whose  family  name  is  more  commonly 
spelt  "  Law,"  was  born  at  Chinsurah ;  educated  at  the  Hindu  College, 
Calcutta ;  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Messrs.  Prawn  Kissen  Law  and 
Company,  and  a  Zamindar ;  appointed  Justice  of  the  Peace  and  Honorary 
Presidency  Magistrate ;  first  native  Member  of  the  Port  Commission ; 
Member  of  the  Bengal  Legislative  Council  1874  ;  a  Member  of  the  Senate 
of  the  Calcutta  University;  elected  a  Governor  of  the  Mayo  Hospital  nth 
April  1878;  Member  of  the  Imperial  Legislative  Council  1882;  Commis- 
sioner for  the  Reduction  of  Public  Debt  February  1882;  Sheriff  1882  ; 
made  a  Companion  of  the  Indian  Empire  24th  May  1884  ;  President  of  the 
British  Indian  Association  in  1885  and  1888;  the  title  of  Raja  was  con- 
ferred in  1887;  again  appointed  a  Member  of  the,  Imperial  Legislative 
Council  1888  ;  the  title  of  Maharaja  conferred  in  1891  ;  and  exempted  from 
personal  attendance  in  Civil  Courts  27th  January  1892.  The  Maharaja  has 
two  sons — the  Maharaj-Kumar  Kristo  Dass  Law,  born  24th  February  1849; 
and  Maharaj-Kumar  Rishee  Kesh  Law,  born  4th  May  1852,  both  Honorary 
Presidency  Magistrates. 

Residence. — 2  Cornwallis  Street,  Calcutta. 

K  • 


130  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


DURGA  GATI  BANARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Is  a  distinguished  member  of  the  Uncovenanted  Civil  Service.  Obtained 
the  title  on  ist  January  1891,  "for  good  work  as  Personal  Assistant  to  the 
Commissioners  of  the  Patna  and  Presidency  Divisions,  and  as  Collector  of 
Stamp  Revenue  and  Superintendent  of  Excise  Revenue,  Calcutta." 

Residence. — C  alcutta. 

DURGA  PARSHAD,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  8th  September  1827.  The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1885, 
as  a  personal  distinction.  Belongs  to  a  family  which  came  originally  from 
Kanauj  in  the  Farrukhabad  district  and  settled  in  Bareli.  Educated  at  Bareli ; 
appointed  to  the  Education  Service  in  1852,  in  which  he  served  with  great 
distinction,  and  was  made  Inspector  of  Schools  of  the  Western  Circle  of  Oudh 
in  1870.  At  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  on  ist  January  1877,  on 
the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress 
of  India,  received  a  Silver  Medal  and  a  Certificate  of  Honour.  In  1883 
appointed  Inspector  of  Schools  for  Rohilkhand,  and  retired  on  pension  in 
1885.  Is  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and  has  filled  many  important  public 
positions.  The  Rai  Bahadur  has  three  sons — Kunwar  Kanhia  Lai,  born 
1850;  Kunwar  Lai  Bahadur,  born  1863;  Kunwar  Jagdamba  Prasad, 
born  1870. 

Residence. — Bareli,  North- Western  Provinces. 

DURGA  PARSHAD,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  gth  October  1843.  The  title  was  conferred  on  29th  May  1886,  as 
a  personal  distinction.  Belongs  to  a  family  that  came  originally  from  Lahore 
and  settled  at  Benares,  purchasing  estates  in  various  districts.  His  grand- 
father was  Kanhaiya  Lai,  who  was  treasurer  of  Gorakhpur  1802-14.  Was 
appointed  an  Honorary  Magistrate  in  1871,  and  has  rendered  good  service 
in  that  capacity.  Received  a  Certificate  of  Honour  at  the  Imperial  Assem- 
blage of  Delhi  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of 
Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India  ;  and  in  1879  was  presented 
with  a  khilat  in  recognition  of  his  services  in  the  famine  of  1876-77.  Is  a 
Member  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  the  North- Western  Provinces. 

Residence. — Gordkhpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 

DURGA  PRASAD,  PANDIT,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  was  conferred,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  25th  May  1892, 
in  recognition  of  his  eminence  as  an  oriental  scholar.  It  entitles  him  to  take 
rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Jaipur,  Ra"jputa"na. 

DURGA  PRASHAD  GHOSH,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1878,  as  a  personal  distinction. 
Residence. — Hugli,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  131 


DURJAN  SINGH  (of  Patehpur),  Rdjd. 

Born  22nd  July  1837.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Raj  Gond 
family  that  claims  an  antiquity  of  more  than  900  years,  the  tradition  being 
that  the  jdgir  of  Fatehpur  was  granted  to  their  ancestors  in  939  A. D.  A 
sanad  of  the  Raja  Kamal  Nain,  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla,  dated  1500  A.D.,  is 
still  in  existence,  conferring  or  confirming  thisjdgir. 

Residence. — Hoshangabad,  Central  Provinces. 


DWARIKA  NATH  MUKHARJI,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Born  in  February  1831.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i5th  March  1882, 
as  a  personal  distinction.  Belongs  to  a  Kulin  Brahman  family  of  high  caste, 
descended  from  the  famous  Kamdev  Pandit.  Educated  at  the  Nizamat 
College;  Murshidabad.  Appointed  to  the  Public  Works  Department  in  1849  > 
and  from  1856  to  1889  executed  many  very  important  works  in  Fort 
William  and  elsewhere.  Rendered  valuable  service  during  the  Mutiny  of 
1857;  retired  on  pension  August  1889.  His  grandfather,  Navakisor 
Mukharji,  was  in  the  service  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh ;  and  his  father,  the 
Diwan  Radhanath  Mukharji,  was  in  the  Public  Works  Department,  and 
became  Diwan  to  Her  Highness  the  Nawab  Bhao  Begam.  Has  a  son  and 
heir,  Babu  Devendranath  Mukharji. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


DWARKA  TBWARI,  SUBAHDAR,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Nepa"l. 

BDALJI  PBSTANJI,  Khan  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  February  1875. 
Residence. — Mhow,  Central  India. 

ELAYA  RAJA,   The.     See  Travancore,  Mahdrdjd  of; 
also  see  Cochin,  Rdjd  of. 

FAGHFUR  MIRZA,  Mirza  Bahddur. 

Is  the  son-in-law  of  the  late  Wajid  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh.  Son  of 
Nawab  Mumtaz-ud-daula,  son  of  Asghar  Ali  Khan,  eldest  son  of  Muhammad 
Ali  Shah,  third  King  of  Oudh.  On  the  death  of  the  latter  he  was  succeeded 
by  his  second  son,  Amjad  Ali  Shah,  though  the  Nawab  Mumtaz-ud-daula, 
the  son  of  the  eldest  son,  was  alive.  Mumtaz-ud-daula  married  Zinat-un- 
Nissa,  the  daughter  of  Malika  Zamani,  one  of  the  consorts  of  Nasir-ud-din 
Haidar,  second  king. 

Residence. — Oudh. 


132  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


PAIZ  ALI  KHAN  BAHADUR  (of  Kotah),  NAWAB  SIR, 

K.C.S.I. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most 
Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  3ist  December  1875. 
Residence. — Kotah,  Rajputdna. 

FAIZ  MUHAMMAD  KAZI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i2th  April  1876. 
Residence. — Karachi,  Sind. 

PAIZ-ULLA  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  loth  July  1878. 
Residence. — Jodhpur,  Rajputana. 

FAIZ-UN-NISA,  CHAUDHRAIN,  Nawdb  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence.  — Tipperah,  B  engal. 

PAKHR-UD-DIN  HAIDAR  ALI  KHAN,  SAYYID,  Nawdb 
Intikhab-ud-dauld. 

Is  a  grandson  of  the  late  Wajid  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh,  being  the  son 
of  the  Nawab  Azmat-ud-daula,  who  married  one  of  the  King's  daughters. 
The  title  was  granted  to  Azmat-ud-daula  by  King  Wajid  Ali  Shah  in  1849. 

Residence. — O  udh. 

PAKIRJI  JIWAJI,  Khdn  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3rd  February  1882. 
Residence.  — Bombay. 

PARDANJI  PBSTANJI,  Khdn  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  8th  October  1874. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

PARID-UD-DIN,  MAULAVI,  SAYYID,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  September  1827.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th 
February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty,  for  distinguished  service  as  a  Judge.  The  family  traces  its 
descent  from  Sayyid  Abdul  Khair,  of  Khursan,  who  settled  in  Kara,  district 
Allahabad,  in  the  year  1300.  The  Khan  Bahadur's  ancestors  received  muafi 
grants  from  the  Mughal  Emperors  for  their  ability  and  learning. 

Residence. — Agra,  North-Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  133 


PARIDKOT,  His  Highness  the  Rdjd  Bahadur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1842  ;  succeeded  to  ft&  gadi  22nd  April  1874.  His  full  titles  are 
— His  Highness  Farzand-i-Saadat-i-Nishan-i-Hazrat-i-Kaisar-i-Hind  Barar  Bans 
Raja  Bikram  Singh  Bahadur,  Raja  Bahadur  of  Faridkot.  Is  the  head  of  the 
Barar  Jat  tribe  of  Sikhs,  the  family  tracing  their  origin  from  Barar,  seventeenth 
in  descent  from  Jesal,  the  founder  of  the  Jesalmir  State,  and  the  ancestor  of 
the  Sidhu  and  other  illustrious  Jat  clans.  A  descendant  of  Barar's,  named 
Ballan,  rose  to  eminence  in  the  time  of  the  Emperor  Akbar.  His  nephew 
built  Kot-Kapura,  a  fort  about  six  miles  south  of  the  town  of  Faridkot ;  and 
a  descendant  named  Sardar  Hamir  Singh  became  independent  Chief  of 
Faridkot  in  1782.  In  1808  Faridkot  submitted  to  the  Maharaja  Ranjit 
Singh,  and  the  territory  was  granted  to  Diwan  Mokam  Chand,  the  Lahore 
General.  But  when  in  1808-9  the  British  Government  demanded  from  the 
Maharaja  the  surrender  of  his  conquests  on  the  left  bank  of  the  Sutlej, 
Faridkot  was  given  back  to  its  ancient  possessors;  and  in  1845,  when  the 
first  Sikh  war  broke  out,  the  Sardar  Pahar  Singh  of  Faridkot  attached  him- 
self to  the  English,  using  his  utmost  exertions  to  collect  supplies  and  carriage, 
and  furnishing  guides  for  the  army.  Pahar  Singh  received  as  his  reward  the 
title  of  Raja,  together  with  half  the  territory  confiscated  from  the  Raja  of 
Nabha,  and  in  this  obtained  possession  once  more  of  Kot-Kapura,  the 
ancestral  seat  of  his  family.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  Raja  Wazir 
Singh,  who  joined  the  English  in  the  second  Sikh  war,  and  greatly  dis- 
tinguished himself  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857  by  seizing  mutineers,  guarding 
the  ferries  over  the  Sutlej,  and  attacking  a  notorious  rebel  named  Sham  Das, 
whose  village  he  destroyed.  His  troops  served  with  credit  under  General 
Van  Cortlandt  in  Sirsa  and  elsewhere.  For  these  services  Raja  Wazir  Singh 
received  the  additional  titles  of  "  Barar  Bans  Raja  Saheb  Bahadur,"  a  khilat 
of  increased  value,  and  a  salute  of  1 1  guns.  He  was  also  exempted  from 
the  service  of  ten  horsemen,  which  he  had  previously  had  to  provide ;  and  in 
1862  he  received  a  sanad  conferring  the  right  of  adoption.  The  present 
Raja  has  given  up  excise  and  transit  duties  in  exchange  for  compensation. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  612  square  miles;  its  population  97,034,  of  whom 
40,182  are  Sikhs,  27,463  are  Hindus,  and  29,035  are  Muhammadans.  His 
Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  70  cavalry,  300  infantry,  and  6  guns ; 
and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Faridkot,  Punjab. 


134  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


FARRUKH  MUHAMMAD  TAKI  ALI,  Mirza  Bahadur. 

Is  the  grandson  of  the  late  Amjad  All  Shah,  fourth  King  of  Oudh,  being 
the  son  of  Mirza  Dara  Sitwat.  The  title  was  conferred  by  King  Muhammad 
Ali  Shah  on  Prince  Dara  Sitwat  in  1838. 

Residence. — O  udh. 

FARRUKH  SHAH.     See  Muhammad  Farrukh  Shah. 

FARRUKH  SIYAR,  Shdhzdda. 

Is  a  descendant  of  Shah  Shuja,  the  King  of  Kabul,  who  was  restored  to 
the  throne  of  Afghanistan  by  the  British.  The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and 
was  recognised  4th  February  1853. 

Residence. — Ludhicina,  Punjab. 

FATBH  KHAN  walad  ABBAS  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 


FATBH  KHAN  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Amirs 
of  the  Talpur  family,  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

FATEH  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

FATBH  KHAN,  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  personal ;  a  courtesy  title. 
Residence. — Hala,  Sind. 

FATBH  KHAN,  MIR  (of  Mirpur),  His  Highness. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  loth  November  1877,  His 
Highness  being  a  descendant  of  the  Amir  who  was  ruling  at  the  time  of  the 
conquest. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  135 

FATBH  KHAN,  Khan. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Chang,  Merwara. 

FATEH  KHAN  GHEBA,  SARDAR,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Rawalpindi,  Punjab. 

FATEH  SHER  KHAN,  TIWANA,  MALLIK,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  3ist  January  1860  as  a  personal  distinction. 
Belongs  to  an  ancient  Rajput  family,  the  Tiwanas  of  Mitha  Tiwana,  who 
claim  common  descent  with  the  Sials  of  Jhang  and  the  Ghebas  of  Pindigheb, 
all  in  the  division  of  Rawalpindi,  Punjab.  Amir  Ali  Khan  was  the  founder 
of  the  family ;  and  his  son,  Mir  Ahmad  Khan,  built  Mitha  Tiwana,  which 
became  a  flourishing  town  under  his  successors,  Dadu  Khan  and  Sher  Khan. 
Dadu  Khan  was  killed  in  a  skirmish  with  his  own  son  Sher  Khan,  who  then 
became  Chief.  His  grandson,  Ahmad  Yar  Khan,  submitted  to  the  Maha- 
raja Ranjit  Singh  ,  and  the  nephew  of  Ahmad  Yar  Khan,  Fateh  Khan,  held  a 
command  under  Sardar  Hari  Singh  Nalwa  till  the  death  of  that  General  in 
1837.  Subsequently  he  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  Bannu  territory  by 
Raja  Dhyan  Singh,  Prime  Minister  at  Lahore.  On  the  outbreak  of  the  re- 
bellion in  1848  Fateh  Singh,  on  the  recommendation  of  Lieutenant  Edwardes, 
was  appointed  Governor  of  Bannu.  He  did  good  service,  but  his  fort  of 
Dalipnagar  was  besieged  by  the  mutineers,  and  he  was  shot  down  in  the 
gateway.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Fateh  Sher  Khan,  the  present 
Mallik,  who  served  as  one  of  Major  Edwardes's  chief  officers.  In  the 
Mutiny  of  1857  he  rendered  excellent  service  in  the  Hissar  and  Jhajjar  terri- 
tories, and  was  rewarded  with  an  extensive  jdgir,  as  well  as  the  title  of  Khan 
Bahadur. 

Residence. — Shdhpur,  Punjab. 

FATEH  SINGH  (of  Pawayan),  Rdjd. 

Born  loth  October  1858.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  present  Raja 
succeeded  his  adoptive  father  on  the  i7th  May  1889.  Belongs  to  a  family 
of  Gaur  Rajputs,  who  first  came  into  the  district  of  Shahjahanpur  to  help  the 
Rani  of  Nahil  against  the  Pathans.  Udhai  Singh,  the  leader  of  the  second 
expedition,  founded  the  town  of  Pawayan.  At  the  time  of  the  cession  in 
1802  the  great-grandson  of  Udhai  Singh,  named  Raja  Raghunath  Singh,  was 
Raja  of  Pawayan,  and  he  was  confirmed  in  his  possessions  by  Mr.  Wellesley, 
the  Deputy  Governor.  He  was  succeeded  in  1825  by  his  widow  the  Rani ; 
and  the  latter,  having  adopted  Raja  Jagannath  Singh  (the  uncle  and  adoptive 
father  of  the  present  Raja),  died  in  1850.  The  Raja  is  an  Honorary 
Magistrate. 

Residence. — Shdhjahdnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


136  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


PATEH  SINGH  (of  Thehpur),  Sarddr. 

Born  1823.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Descended  from  Sardar  Milka 
Singh,  who  was  one  of  the  most  powerful  of  the  Sikh  Chiefs  during  the  latter 
half  of  the  last  century.  He  died  in  1804,  and  his  son,  Sardar  Jiwan 
Singh,  died  the  next  year.  The  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  then  seized  the 
largest  portion  of  the  estate,  giving  Sardar  Anand  Singh,  the  son  and  heir  of 
Jiwan  Singh,  jdgirs  in  Firozpur  district.  Sardar  Anand  Singh  died  in  1831, 
leaving  his  only  son,  the  present  Sardar,  a  minor  of  eight  years  of  age.  On 
the  annexation  of  the  Punjab  the  Sardar's  personal  jdgir  was  confirmed  to 
him  for  life — one  quarter  to  descend  to  his  son,  who  is  named  Shamsher 
Singh,  born  in  1843. 

Residence. — Thehpur,  Lahore,  Punjab. 


PATBH  SINGH,  RAJ  (of  Dilwara),  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — M  e wa"  r,  Ra"  j  puta"  na. 

PATH  ALI,  Nawdb,  C.SJ.     See  Banganapale,  Nawdb  of. 

FAUJDAR  KHAN  (of  Ashti),  Nawdb. 

Born  about  1825.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Nawab  is  the  son  of 
Nawab  Hatam  Khan ;  and  is  descended  in  a  direct  line  from  the  Afghan 
Chief,  Muhammad  Khan  Niazi,  to  whom  Ashti  was  granted  as  a  jdgir  by 
the  Emperor  Jahangir  of  Delhi.  The  title  of  Nawab  was  conferred  by  the 
Emperor  Shah  Jahan,  and  has  been  recognised  by  the  British  Government. 
The  Nawab  has  a  son  and  heir  named  Hatam  Khan. 

Residence. — Ashti,  Wardha,  Central  Provinces. 


FAZL  AHMAD  KHAN  (of  Panipat),  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  descended  from  the  Nawab  Lutf-ulla  Khan, 
whose  great-grandson,  Nawab  Bakar  AH  Khan,  was  the  grandfather  of  the 
present  Nawab.  The  family  occupied  important  posts  under  the  Mughal 
Emperors  of  Delhi.  The  Nawab  Bakar  AH  Khan  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
the  Nawab  Aman-ulla  Khan ;  he  rendered  excellent  service  to  Government 
during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  was  rewarded  with  a  considerable  grant  of 
lands.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  elder  son,  the  present  Nawab. 

Residence. — Pdnipat,  Karnal,  Punjab. 


FAZL  ALI  walad  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  the  Mirs  who  were 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  137 

FAZL  HUSAIN,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1826.     The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1882, 
in  recognition  of  eminent  services  rendered  during  the  famine  of  1877. 
Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

FAZL  HUSAIN  KHAN  walad  SOHRAB  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  the  Mirs  who  were 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shika"rpur,  Sind. 

FAZL  IMAM  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal;  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Patna,  Bengal. 

FAZL  MUHAMMAD  walad  ALI  BAKHSH  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  the  Mirs  who  were 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

FIEOZ  KHAN  (of  Bari),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Raja  is  a  Gakkar  Chief,  son  of  Raja  All 
Gauhar  Khan.  The  Gakkars  trace  their  descent  from  Kai  Gohar,  a  native 
of  Ispahan  in  Persia,  whose  son,  Sultan  Kaid,  is  said  to  have  conquered 
Badakshan  and  part  of  Thibet.  They  were  settled  in  the  Punjab  about  300 
A.D.  ;  and  their  conquest  of  Kashmir,  and  their  resistance  to  the  Emperor 
Babar,  are  historical  events.  The  Raja  has  two  sons,  named  Sher  Ahmad 
Khan  and  Gauhar  Rahman. 

Residence. — Haza"ra,  Punjab. 

FRAMJI  ARDBSAR,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1888. 
Residence. — Ahmednagar,  Bombay. 

GABAT,  THAKUR  VAJESING-H,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1875  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor ;  is  a  tributary  to  Idar, 
and  belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.  The  State  has  an  area  of  22 
square  miles;  and  a  population  of  1430,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Gabat,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


I38  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GABBAR  SINGH  (of  Kaimori),  Rao. 

The  title  is  hereditary  ;  and  was  originally  conferred  by  Raja  Bikram 
Shah,  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla.  The  family  is  said  to  be  descended  from 
Shiani  Shah  Rao,  who  first  bore  the  title  of  Rao. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

GAD,  Thdkur  of.     See  Garh. 

GADHI,  RAJA  UMAR  SINGH  walad  DBVRAO,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1868  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  6th  October  1886.  The  area  of  the 
State,  which  is  one  of  the  Dang  States  of  Khandesh,  is  170  square  miles ;  its 
population  6309,  chiefly  Bhils,  Konknas,  and  other  aboriginal  tribes. 

Residence. — Gadhi,  Khdndesh,  Bombay. 

GADHKA,  AZAM  JADBJA  SHIVSINGHJI  GOVINDJI, 

Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1869;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor,  26th  November  1870. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  23  square 
miles;  its  population  2252,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Gadhka,  Kd.thi£wdr,  Bombay. 

GAGAR  MAL,  LALA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign,  as  a  personal  distinction. 

Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

GAJAMAN  KRISHNA  BHATAVADEKAR,  Rao  Bahdditr. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence.  — Baroda. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


139 


GAJAPATI  RAO,  G.  N.,  Rdjd,  C.LE. 

Born  2nd  December  1828.     Is  a  scion  of  the  ancient  Goday  family  of 
Vizagapatam  in  the  Northern  Circars,  Madras  Presidency,  and  Zamindar  of 

Ankapalle  and  other  estates.  Educated  in  the 
Hindu  College,  Calcutta.  Was  a  Member  of 
the  Madras  Legislative  Council  from  1868  to 
1884;  and  a  Fellow  of  the  University  of 
Madras.  The  title  of  Raja  was  conferred 
upon  him  in  1881  ;  and  the  Companionship 
of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire  in  1892.  Has  established  and  main- 
tains several  schools ;  presented  the  statue  of 
Her  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress  of  India  to 
the  city  of  Madras  in  honour  of  Her  Majesty's 
Jubilee  in  1887  ;  and  has  given  large  donations 
to  many  public  objects.  Has  received  from 

His   Holiness  the  Pope  Leo  XIII.,  through 

His  Delegate  Apostolic  in  East  Indies,  in  1891, 

a  mosaic  picture  as  a  mark  of  appreciation  of  his  kindness  shown  to  the 
Catholics  of  Vizagapatam.  The  Raja's  grandfather,  Sri  Goday  Jaga  Rao, 
distinguished  himself  in  the  service  of  Government  about  the  middle  of  the 
1 8th  century.  It  was  of  him  that  the  Honourable  Court  of  Directors  in  a 
communication  to  the  Government  of  Fort  Saint  George,  dated  iyth  April 
1789,  wrote:  "We  concur  in  the  acknowledgment  your  Government  have 
rendered  of  the  zeal  for  our  interests  manifested  on  various  occasions  by 
Goday  Jugga  Row."  Sri  Jaga  Rao  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sri  Goday 
Soorya  Narayan  Rao,  father  of  the  Raja;  born  1792,  died  1853.  Lord 
Connemara,  when  publicly  complimenting  the  Raja  on  his  presentation  of  the 
statue  of  the  Queen  Empress  to  the  city  of  Madras,  said  of  this  gentleman  : 
"The  Raja's  father,  Goday  Soorya  Narayan  Rao,  followed  in  the  footsteps  of 
his  father,  founded  various  charitable  institutions,  and  during  the  famine  of 
1833  fed  a  large  number  of  poor  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Nellore.  He  also 
contributed  largely  to  various  public  works."  The  Raja's  crest  is  a  rising 
sun  over  a  Hindu  device,  with  the  motto,  "  I  desire  the  Light,"  in  Sanskrit 
and  Latin. 

Residences. — The  Mahal,  Vizagapatam ;  and  The  Mansion,  Madras. 


I4o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GAJINDAR  SINGH  (of  Majithia),  Sardar. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  the  same  family  of  the  Shergil  Jat 
tribe  as  his  first  cousin  the  Sardar  Dayal  Singh  of  Majithia  (see  Dayal 
Singh),  both  Sardars  being  grandsons  of  Sardar  Disa  Singh.  The  father 
of  Sardar  Gajindar  Singh  was  Sardar  Ranjodh  Singh,  half-brother  of  Sardar 
Lahna  Singh,  being  the  son  [of  Sardar  Disa  Singh  by  another  mother.  He 
was  a  General  in  the  Sikh  Army. 

Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

GAJRAJ  SINGH  (of  Hirapur),  Thdkur. 

Born  1832.  The  title  is  hereditary;  and  is  said  to  have  been  first 
acquired  from  Raja  Narbar.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  family  of  the  Bais-Suraj- 
Bansi,  or  Bais  Solar  race ;  said  to  have  come  from  the  neighbourhood  of 
Delhi  in  the  time  of  the  Gond  Rajas.  Anup  Singh,  one  of  his  ancestors, 
rendered  military  service  to  the  Raja  of  Pitehra ;  for  which  he  received  a 
jdgir  in  Sagar  territory.  The  Thakur  has  five  sons — Than  Singh,  Bhagwant 
Singh,  Ajmir  Singh,  Bisal  Singh,  and  Kaliar  Singh. 

Residence. — Hirapur,  Narsinghpur,  Central  Provinces. 

GALE  MATING,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Tavoy,  Burma. 

GANDA  SINGH  (of  Dhiru  Majra),  Sardar. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  is  the  present  head  of  the  Dhiru 
Majra  Sardars,  who  come  of  a  Jat  family.  He  has  taken  great  interest  in 
educational  matters. 

Residence. — Dhiru  Majra,  Ludhia"na,  Punjab. 

GANBSH  BALKRISHNA  HANCHINAL,  Azam. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  26th  November  1883. 
Residence. — Belgaum,  Bombay. 

GANESH  GANGADHAR,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

GANESH  GOVIND,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i7th  October  1884. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  141 


GANESH  SITARAM  SHASTRI,  SAR  SUBAH,  Rao  Bahddur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress,  as  a  personal 
distinction. 

Residence. — Baroda. 

GANGA  BISHTU  RAI,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  December  1884. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

GANGA  CHARAN  DAS,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883. 
Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 


GANGA  PARSHAD  SINGH,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  July  1888. 
Residence. — Darbhanga,  Bengal. 


GANGA  RAM,  Rai. 

Born  1811.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Khatri  family  that 
has  long  resided  at  Delhi,  but  came  originally  from  Nawashahr,  in  the 
Jalandhar  division  of  the  Punjab.  Several  members  of  the  family  obtained 
positions  of  trust  and  honour  under  the  Mughal  Emperors ;  and  one,  Nagar 
Mai,  obtained  the  title  of  Maharaja.  The  Rai  has  four  sons — Baldeo  Singh, 
Ram  Singh,  Sham  Singh,  and  Surat  Singh. 

Residence. — Delhi,  Punjab. 


GANGADHAR  SHASTRI,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign,  in  recognition  of  his  eminence  in  oriental 
learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular 
Rajas. 

Residence. — Benares,  North- Western  Provinces. 


GANGAJI  RAMJI,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Bombay. 


I42  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GANGPUR,  RAJA  RAGHUNATH  SIKHAR  DEO,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1849  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  November  1858.  Belongs  to  a 
Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family,  known  as  the  Sikhar  family  of  Sikharpur  or 
Pachete  in  Manbhum.  The  Raja's  eldest  son  and  heir  bears  the  title  of 
Tikait,  and  is  named  Tikait  Harinath  Sikhar  Deo.  The  area  of  the  State, 
which  is  one  of  the  Chota  Nagpur  Tributary  Mahals,  is  2484  square  miles; 
its  population  107,985,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Gangpur,  Chota  Ndgpur,  Bengal. 


GANPAT  RAI  (of  Deri  Ghazi  Khan,  Punjab),  C.I.E.,  Diwdn. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883.  The 
Diwan,  for  eminent  services  rendered  to  Government  as  an  Extra  Assistant 
Commissioner  in  Baluchistan,  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent 
Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Baluchistan. 


GANPAT  RAO  (of  Jaisinghnagar),  Rao. 

Born  1845.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  conferred  by  the 
old  Mahratta  Government.  The  ancestors  of  this  family  were  a  branch  of 
that  of  the  ancient  rulers  of  Sagar.  The  Rao  has  a  son  and  heir,  named 
Narayan  Rao. 

Residence. — Jaisinghpur,  Sdgar,  Central  Provinces. 


GANPATRAO  MOROBA  PITALB,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3ist  January  1870. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

GANPATRAO  RAMCHANDAR,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3ist  October  1879. 
Residence. — Ujjain,  Central  India. 


GARAB  SINGH  (of  Nandsa),   Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Rajas  of 
Deogarh.  The  Thakur  is  Jagirdar  of  Pachmari,  and  his  jdgir  was  originally 
held  by  a  family  of  Mowasses  of  Korkors,  the  hereditary  guardians  of  the 
Cave  of  Mahadeo,  in  the  Pachmari  Hills. 

Residence. — Nandsa,  Hoshangabad,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


143 


The  Santak  of  the  Chauhan 
Rajputs,  called  Chakra,  used 
in  the  seal  and  for  signature. 

(A  circle  with  four  Trisulas  or 
Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car- 
dinal points.) 


GARH,  THAKUR  CHANDRASINGHJI, 

Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1866;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  loth 
November  1884.  Belongs  to  a  Chauhan  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family,  descended  from  a  younger  brother 
of  one  of  the  ancestors  of  the  Chief  of  Chhota 
Udaipur,  to  whom  the  Thakur  of  Garh  is  tributary. 
The  State,  which  is  the  largest  in  the  Sankhera 
Mehvas,  contains  an  area  of  134  square  miles;  its 
population  is  almost  entirely  Bhil  (aboriginal). 

Residence. — Garh,  Rewa"  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


The  Santak  of  the  Chauhan 
Rajputs,  called  Chakra,  used 
in  the  seal  and  for  signature. 

(A  circle  with  four  Trisulas  or 
Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car- 
dinal points.) 


GARHA,  RAJA  BALBHADAR  SINGH, 

Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1870;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  7th  April 
1 88 1.  Belongs  to  a  Chauhan  Rajput  (Hindu) 
family.  The  State  is  feudatory  to  Gwalior,  and 
was  formerly  a  portion  of  the  Rajhugarh  jdgir. 
Its  name  is  sometimes  spelt  Gharra.  Its  popula- 
tion is  about  9500. 

Residence. — Garha,  Guna,  Central  India. 


GARHWAL,  Rdjd  of.     See  Tehri. 


GARRAULI,  DIWAN  BAHADUR  CHANDRA  BHAN  SINGH, 

Jdgir  ddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1884;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i6th  March  1885. 
Belongs  to  the  Bundela  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  of  the  Orchha  stock  that  has 
given  rulers  to  so  many  States  of  Central  India  (see  Panna,  Ajaigarh,  Dattia, 
Charkhari,  Bijawar,  Sarila,  Jigni,  Jaso,  Lughasi,  etc.)  Man  Singh,  the 
younger  grandson  of  Rudra  Pratap  (founder  of  Orchha),  was  the  founder  of 
the  Satgharia  branch  of  this  family,  from  which  descend  the  Garrauli  Chiefs. 
Diwan  Gopal  Singh  obtained  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1812. 
He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Diwan  Parichhat,  on  whom  the  additional 
title  of  Bahadur  was  conferred,  ryth  October  1844.  The  area  of  the  State 
is  25  square  miles;  its  population  4976,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Diwan 
Bahadur  maintains  a  military  force  of  2  cavalry,  56  infantry,  and  4  guns. 

Residence. — Garrauli,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


144  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GAUHAR  KHAN,  O.I.B.,  Sardar. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  the  Chief  of  the  Jalawan 
Brahuis  of  Baluchistan.  He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  on  the  institution  of  that  Order,  ist 
January  1878. 

Residence. — Baluchistan. 


GAUR  GRANDER  MAN  SINGH  HARI  CHANDAN  MURDRAJ 
BHRAMARBAR  RAI  (of  Parikud),  Rdjd. 

Born  in  November  1850.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  present  Raja 
succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  death  of  his  father,  Raja  Chandra  Sikhar  Man 
Singh,  in  1872.  Belongs  to  an  ancient  family,  whose  founder  was  the  Raja 
Jadu  Raj.  He  possessed  Parikud  and  other  territory  in  the  time  of  the 
Mughals.  He  fought  against  the  Subahdar  of  the  province  on  behalf  of  the 
Nawab  Parasuramraj  Pandit,  and  defeated  him,  receiving  large  grants  of  terri- 
tory from  the  Nawab  as  his  reward.  Towards  the  close  of  the  Mahratta  rule 
the  Raja  Harisebak  of  Parikud  was  defeated  by  the  Raja  of  Khurdah,  and 
lost  most  of  his  possessions.  Raja  Chandra  Sikhar  Man  Singh,  predecessor 
of  the  present  Raja,  showed  great  liberality  in  the  time  of  the  Orissa  famine 
of  1866,  and  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the 
Star  of  India. 

Residence. — Parikud,  Puri,  Orissa,  Bengal. 


GAURHARI  RAI,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  7th  April  1884. 
Residence. — Midnapur,  Bengal. 


GAURIHAR,  RAO  SHAMLB  PRASAD  BAHADUR,  Jdgirddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  death  of  the  late  Rao  Gaja- 
dhar  Prasad,  i4th  November  1887.  Belongs  to  a  Brahman  (Hindu)  family, 
that  held  the  title  of  "  Sawai  Rajdhar  "  from  ancient  times.  At  the  beginning 
of  the  present  century  Rajdhar  Raja  Ram,  the  head  of  the  family,  was 
a  Sardar  of  the  Banda-Ajaigarh  State,  and  Governor  of  its  fort  of  Bhuragarh 
at  Banda.  He  became  a  leader  of  note,  and  in  1807  was  granted  the 
Gaurihar /dg77'  by  the  British  Government.  His  son,  Rajdhar  Rudra  Pratap, 
did  excellent  service,  and  incurred  great  personal  loss  at  Banda.  For  this 
the  Government  conferred  on  him,  in  the  Cawnpur  Darbar  of  1859,  the 
title  of  Rao  Bahadur,  a  khilat,  and  the  right  of  adoption.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  72  square  miles;  its  population  is  10,691,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Chief  maintains  a  military  force  of  43  cavalry,  198  infantry,  and  6  guns. 

Residence. — Gaurihar,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  145 


GAURISHANKAR  UDESHANKAR,  AZAM,  C.S.L 

Born  2ist  August  1805;  was  for  a  long  time  the  Diwdn  or  Prime 
Minister  of  the  State  of  Bhaunagar  (g.v.\  in  Kathiawdr,  where  he  so 
distinguished  himself  by  his  vigorous  administration  and  numerous  reforms 
as  to  earn  from  Sir  Bartle  Frere,  then  Governor  of  Bombay,  the  high  praise 
of  being  "one  of  the  best  and  ablest  of  modern  native  statesmen."  At  the 
Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi,  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  he  was 
created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  with 
a  Medal  of  Honour.  He  retired  from  the  service  of  the  Bhaunagar  State  in 
1879,  having  been  honourably  engaged  in  it  for  a  period  of  no  less  than 
fifty-seven  years. 

Residence. — Bhaunagar,  Ka"thia"war. 

GAVRIDAD,  AZAM  JADBJA  PRATAPSINGHJI  MERUJI, 

Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1839;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1855.  Belongs  to  a.  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family.  The  State,  which  was  the  original  seat  of  the  Chiefs  of 
Palitana,  has  an  area  of  27  square  miles;  and  a  population  of  2381,  chiefly 
Hindus.  The  Talukdar  maintains  a  military  force  of  1 1  cavalry,  1 9  infantry, 
and  2  guns. 

Residence. — Gavridad,  Kd.thid.w^r,  Bombay. 

GAWHALI,   Chief  of.     See  Raysinghpur. 

GAYA  PARSHAD  (of  Pindarna),   Thakur. 

Born  1852.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by 
Raja  Mardan  Singh  of  Garhakota.  An  ancestor  of  the  family,  named  Rawat 
Parshad,  saved  the  life  of  the  Raja  Mardan  Singh  from  the  Raja  of  Tehri, 
and  obtained  from  him  a  sanad  on  copper-plate,  granting  him  lands  and  the 
title  of  Thakur.  He  has  one  son,  Thakur  Bhairao  Parshad. 

Residence. — Pindarna,  Sdgar,  Central  Provinces. 

GEROLI,  Diwdn  Bahddur  of.    See  Garrauli. 

GHANSHAM  SINGH  (of  Mursan),  Rdjd  Bahddur. 

Born  1851.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  having  long  been  recognised  by 
Government,  was  formally  conferred  on  3rd  December  1859,  for  the  excellent 
services  of  the  Raja  Tikam  Singh,  grandfather  of  the  present  Raja,  during  the 
Mutiny  of  1 85  7.  The  Raja  comes  of  a  family  of  Baisni  Jats,  having  a  common 
ancestor  with  the  Raja  Har  Narayan  Singh  of  Hathras  in  Aligarh — a  Jat  Chief, 
by  name  Makhan,  who  came  from  Rajputana  and  settled  in  the  neighbourhood 
of  Mursan.  His  great-grandson,  Thakur  Nand  Ram,  died  in  1696,  leaving 
fourteen  sons,  of  whom  one  was  named  Zulkaran.  The  latter  left  a  son  named 
Khusal  Singh,  who  obtained  lands  from  the  favour  of  the  Nawab  Vazir  of 

L 


146  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Oudh,  Saadat  Khan.  He  died  in  1749,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Phup 
Singh,  who  largely  increased  the  family  estates,  and  assumed  the  title  of  Raja. 
His  son  Bhagwant  Singh  succeeded  in  1798,  and  also  increased  the  estates, 
and  was  granted  ajagtr  by  the  British  Government  for  good  service  performed 
in  Lord  Lake's  campaign.  He  died  in  1823,  and  was  succeeded  by  Raja 
Tikam  Singh,  of  whom  above.  Raja  Tikam  Singh  was  also  created  a 
Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire.  He  died  in 
1878,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  grandson,  the  present  Raja,  who  is  an 
Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Mursan,  Aligarh,  North-Western  Provinces. 

GHARI,  BHUMIA  NAHAR  SINGH,  Bhumia  of. 

Born  about  1839  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1864.  Belongs  to  a 
Bhilala  family.  The  State  is  also  called  Bhaisakho;  its  population  is 
about  980. 

Residence. — Ghari,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 

GHARRA,  Rdjd  of.     See  Garha. 

GHAUS  SHAH  KADARI,  Khan  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  in  celebra- 
tion of  the  assumption  of  the  Imperial  title  by  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty 
the  Queen  Empress. 

Residence. — Kadar,  Mysore. 

GHAUSIA  BBGAM,  Nawdb. 

Is  the  half-sister  of  His  late  Highness  Muhammad  Ghaus,  the  last  of  the 
titular  Nawabs  of  the  Carnatic.  Was  granted  the  personal  title  of  Nawab  in 
1822. 

Residence. — M  adras. 

GHAYAS-UD-DIN  ALI  KHAN,  DIWAN,  Shaikh-ul-Mushaikh. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 
Residence. — Ajmir. 

GHAYAS-UD-DIN  JALA-UD-DIN  KAZI,  MIR,  Khan  Saheb. 
Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Ndsik,  Bombay. 

GHAZANPAR  ALI,  MIR,  Khan. 

A  member  of  the  Carnatic  family.  The  title  is  a  personal  one  ;  and, 
having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was 
recognised  1890. 

Residence. — M  adras. 

GHORAM  KHAN,  RIND,  Khdn  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2 ist  February  1884. 
Residence. — Karachi,  Sind. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  147 


GHORASAR,  THAKUR  DADA  SAHEB  SURAJMALJI,  Thdkurof. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1869;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  January  1883.  Belongs  to  a 
Dabbi  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  Is  tributary  to  the  Gaekwar.  The  area  of 
the  State  is  40  square  miles  ;  its  population  8400,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence, — Ghorasar,  Ma~hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

GHULAM  AHMAD,  Khan  Bahadur  Kasim  Jang. 

The  title,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic, 
was  recognised  in  1890. 
Residence. — M  adras . 

GHULAM  AHMAD,  MIRZA,  C.I.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  24th  May  1881. 
Residence. — 

GHULAM  AHMAD-ULLA,  Khdn. 

The  title,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic, 
was  recognised  1890.     Is  styled  Muhammad  Khair-ulla  Khan. 
Residence. — M  adras . 


GHULAM  AKBAR  KHAN  walad  HUSAIM  BAKHSH,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


GHULAM  ALI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

A  member  of  the  Carnatic  family.      The  title,  having  been  originally 
conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised  1890. 
Residence. — Madras. 

GHULAM  ALI  walad  ZULFIKAR  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  the  Talpur  Mirs, 
who  were  ruling  in  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

GHULAM  ALI  KHAN  walad  KHAN  MUHAMMAD,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


148  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GHULAM  ALI  KHAN  walad  GHULAM  SHAH  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shika"rpur,  Sind. 

GHULAM  BABA,  MIR,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2yth  June  1878. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 

GHULAM  DASTAGIR,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  in  January  1888. 
Residence. — Trichinopoli,  Madras. 


GHULAM  GHAUS,  MUNSHI  KHWAJA,  Khdn  Bahadur  Zulkadr. 

Born  1822.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  June  1885. 
Belongs  to  a  family  that  left  Kashmir  towards  the  close  of  the  Durrani 
dynasty  on  the  occasion  of  a  political  outbreak,  and  removing  to  Tibet, 
engaged  in  commerce  at  Lhassa  ;  but  subsequently  migrated  to  Nepal,  and 
finally  settled  at  Benares.  Khwaja  Ghulam  Ghaus  succeeded  his  uncle  as 
Mir  Munshi  to  Government,  and  held  that  post  till  his  retirement  in  1885. 
Rendered  loyal  service  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  for  which  a  sanad  and 
khilat  were  conferred  upon  him. 

Residence. — Allahabad,  North-Western  Provinces. 


GHULAM  GHAUS.     See  Ghulam  Muhammad  Ghaus. 

GHULAM  HAIDAR  walad  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 

GHULAM  HASAN,  SHAIKH,  Khdn  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

GHULAM  HUSAIN  walad  NAJIP  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikarpur,  Sind. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  149 


GHULAM  HUSAIN  walad  ALI  GAUHAR  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikcirpur,  Sind. 

GHULAM  HUSAIN  (JATI),  Malik. 

Born  about  1847.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  tradition  being  that  it 
was  first  conferred  by  Sultan  Murad  Khan,  son  of  Sultan  Muhammad  Khan 
of  Constantinople.  There  is  also  a  sanad  from  Muhammad  Shah,  Emperor 
of  Delhi.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  (Muhammadan)  family. 

Residence. — Karachi,  Sind. 


GHULAM  HUSAIN  KHAN  walad  IMAM  BAKHSH 
KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind. 

Residence.  — Shikctrpur,  Sind. 


GHULAM  HUSAIN  KHAN  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


GHULAM  JILANI,  Khan. 

The  title,  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised 
in  1890. 

Residence. — M  adras. 

GHULAM  KADIR  KHAN  walad  KHAN  MUHAMMAD 
KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikcirpur,  Sind. 

GHULAM  KADIR  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890. 
Residence. — Gwalior,  Central  India. 

GHULAM  KASIM  KHAN,  KATI  KHEL  (of  Tank),  Nawdb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  October  1882. 
Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Kha~n,  Punjab. 


150  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GHULAM  MAHMUD,  Khan. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the 
Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised  in  1890.     Is  styled  Niamat  Khan. 
Residence. — Madras. 

GHULAM  MAHMUD,  H AJI,  Khdn  Bahadur  Mutasib  Jang  Mustafi- 
iid-dauld  Sharf-ul-Mulk. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the 
Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised  in  1890. 
Residence. — Madras. 

GHULAM  MOHI-UD-DIN,  Khdn. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the 
Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised  in  1890. 
Residence. — Madras. 

GHULAM  MOHI-UD-DIN,  Khdn. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1881. 
Residence. — Kashm  i  r. 

GHULAM  MUHAMMAD,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1850.  Is  son-in-law  of  His  late  Highness  Prince  Intizam-ul-Mulk, 
the  third  of  the  Princes  of  Arcot ;  granted  the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur 
in  1887. 

Residence. — Madras. 

GHULAM  MUHAMMAD  GHAUS,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1861.  Is  son  of  Muazzaz-ud-daula,  and  grandson  of  His  late 
Highness  Azim  Jah,  the  first  of  the  titular  Princes  of  Arcot.  Granted  the 
personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  in  1876. 

Residence. — Madras. 

GHULAM  MUHAMMAD  HAIDAR,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1834.  Rendered  eminent  service  in  the  Madras  Police,  for  which 
he  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  in  1887.  Retired  on  pension 
in  1890. 

Residence. — Karur,  Coimbatore,  Madras. 

GHULAM  MUHAMMAD  HAJI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3rd  April  1884. 
Residence. — Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  151 


GKEULAM  MUHAMMAD,  Haji,  Khan  Bahadur  Ghalib  Jang  Sharf- 

ud-dauld. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the 
Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised  in  1890. 
Residence. — Madras. 


GHULAM  MUHAMMAD  HASAN  ALI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1850.     Son  of  Sardar  Jang.     Granted  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur 
as  a  personal  distinction  in  1883. 
Residence. — M  adras. 


GHULAM  MUHAMMAD  KHAN  walad  RUSTAM  KHAN, 

Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  the  Talpur  Mirs, 
who  were  ruling  in  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


GHULAM  MUHI-UD-DIN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1852.     Granted  the  personal  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  in  1885,  for 
good  service  in  the  Railway  Department. 
Residence. — Tanjore,  India. 

GHULAM  MURTAZA,  Sardar. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence.  — Baluchistan. 

GHULAM  MURTAZA  KHAN  walad  CHAKAR  KHAN 
(of  Rahuja),  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  the  Talpur  Mirs, 
who  were  rulers  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

GHULAM  MUSTAFA  KHAN,  HAJI,  walad  GHULAM 
HAIDAR,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

GHULAM  NABI,  MUNSHI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Punjab. 


152 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GHULAM  NABI  ALI,  Khan  Bahadur  Nasir  Jang. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  having  been  conferred  originally  by  the 
Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  was  recognised  in  1890.  Is  a  member  of  the 
Carnatic  family. 

Residence. — Madras. 


GHULAM  NABI  KHAN  walad  IMAM  BAKHSH  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     The  Mir  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


GHULAM  NAJAF  KHAN  walad  IMAM  BAKHSH  KHAN, 

Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     The  Mir  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


GHULAM  RASUL,  MIYAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Peshdwar,  Punjab. 


GHUND,  Chief  of. 

Is  a  feudatory  of  the  Raja  of  Keonthal  (q.v.\  and  rules  over  one  of  the 
Simla  Hill  States. 

Residence. — Ghund,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


GIDHAUR,  MAHARAJA  RAVANBSHWAR  PRASAD  SINGH 
BAHADUR,  Maharaja  Bahadur  of. 

Born  1859.  Belongs  to  a  Kshatriya  family  of  the  Chandra  Vansi  or 
Lunar  sept,  whose  founder  was  Bir  Vikram  Singh.  His  ancestors  had  come 
from  Mahoba  in  Bundelkhand,  and  settled  at  Bardi  in  Rewah,  and  he  was 
the  younger  brother  of  the  Raja  of  Bardi.  From  him  the  ninth  in  descent  is 
said  to  have  built  the  temple  of  Baidyanath.  Raja  Dalar  Singh,  fourteenth 
Raja,  is  stated  to  have  received  zfarmdn  from  the  Emperor  Shah  Jahan  in 
1651.  Raja  Gopal  Singh  was  recognised  by  the  British  Government;  and 
his  grandson  was  the  well-known  Sir  Jaimangal  Singh  Bahadur,  K. C.S.I.,  on 
whom  the  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur  was  conferred  for  his  eminent  services 
during  the  Santal  insurrection  and  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  On  ist  January 
1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India,  Sir  Jaimangal  Singh  received  the  hereditary  title  of  Maha- 
raja Bahadur.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Maharaja  Shiva  Prasad  Singh 
Bahadur ;  and  the  latter  by  his  son,  the  present  Maharaja  Bahadur,  who  is 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  153 

well  known  for  his  benevolence  and  loyalty.  Educated  in  Sanskrit,  Persian, 
Hindi,  and  English  ;  married  in  1885,  and  has  a  son  and  heir,  born  in  1890. 
Received  a  khilat  from  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Bengal  on  succeeding  to 
the  title,  also  the  privilege  of  exemption  from  attendance  in  Civil  Courts. 
The  family  cognisance  is  a  trisul,  or  trident  of  Siva. 
Residence. — Gidhaur,  Bengal. 


GIRDHARLAL  ULATRAM,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  27th  December  1872. 
Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 

GIRIAPA  TIMAPA  DBSAI,  Heladi  Naik  Bahadur  Desai  Nadugauda. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Belgaum,  Bombay. 


GIRIJA  NATH  RAI  (of  Dinajpur),  Mahdrdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1884.  Is  the  son 
of  the  late  Maharani  Sham  Mohini  of  Dinajpur ;  and  belongs  to  a  family 
settled  in  the  Dinajpur  district  since  the  time  of  Akbar,  at  which  time  one 
of  its  ancestors,  named  Srimanta  Datta,  was  Zamindar  of  Dinajpur.  His 
daughter  married  Hari  Ram  Rai,  who  had  been  Diwan  to  the  Zamindar  of 
Idrakpur.  The  son  of  this  marriage  was  Suka  Deb  Rai,  who  died  in  1677. 
His  son,  Raja  Jai  Deb,  was  Raja  of  Dinajpur  from  1677  to  1682;  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  brother,  Raja  Prannath,  from  1682  to  1723,  who  adopted 
a  young  relative  named  Ram  Nath,  who  succeeded  to  the  Raj,  and  died  in 
1760.  A  grandson  of  the  latter  by  adoption,  named  Radha  Nath,  was  Raja 
from  1780  to  1 80 1  ;  at  his  accession  he  owned  the  greater  part  of  the  three 
districts  of  Dinajpur,  Maldah,  and  Bogra,  but  after  the  Decennial  Settlement 
the  bulk  of  the  estate  was  sold  for  arrears  of  revenue.  His  grandson  was 
the  Raja  Tarak  Nath,  1840  to  1865,  husband  of  the  late  Maharani  Sham 
Mohini,  and  adoptive  father  of  the  present  Raja.  The  title  of  Maharani  was 
formally  conferred  on  that  lady  in  1875,  for  ner  eminent  benevolence  during 
the  great  famine  of  1873. 

Residence. — Dinajpur,  Bengal. 

GIRISH  CHANDAR  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  April  1874,  for  eminent 
public  services. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


GIRISH  CHANDAR  GHOSH,  Rai  Bahadur. 
:  is  personal,   ar 
ices  as  Judge. 
Residence. — Hugli,  Bengal. 


The  title  is  personal,   and  was  conferred  on    ipth  August    1879,  for 
eminent  services  as  Judge. 


I54  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GIRISH  CHANDAR  RAI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889,  for  eminent 
public  services. 

Residence. — Nalthoba,  Bengal. 

GOBARDHUN  DAS,  SAH,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Born  2Qth  October  1856.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
ist  January  1886,  for  eminent  public  services  as  a  Municipal  Commissioner 
of  Lucknow,  and  an  Honorary  Magistrate.  Belongs  to  an  Agarwala  family ; 
and  is  one  of  the  sons  of  Sah  Benarsi  Das,  late  a  banker  at  Lucknow,  and  a 
partner  in  the  banking  firm  of  Sah  Behari  Lai,  Lucknow. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

GOBIND  RAM,  Rao  Bahddur. 

Born  1 5th  December  1851.  The  title  was  conferred,  2nd  January  1888, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  for  his  services  on  the  District  Board  and  Municipal 
Committee,  and  especially  for  consideration  shown  to  his  debtors  in  proceed- 
ings under  the  Jhansi  Encumbered  Estates  Act.  Belongs  to  a  Gaur  Brahman 
Pattiwal  family,  whose  ancestor,  Khem  Chand,  emigrated  to  Jaipur  from 
Jesalmir,  and  there  established  a  commercial  house ;  and  subsequently 
established  three  more  houses  in  Jhansi.  The  Rao  Bahadur's  uncle 
rendered  good  service  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857. 

Residence. — Jhdnsi,  North-Western  Provinces. 

GOBIND  RAO  NARAYAN,  Rao. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Allahabad,  North-Western  Provinces. 

GOBIND  SAHAI,  Diwdn. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Gujra'nwdla,  Punjab. 

.  GOBIND  SINGH  (of  Beona),  Rdjd. 

Bom  29th  November  1872.  The  title  is  hereditary;  and  is  stated  by 
the  family  to  have  been  obtained  in  the  year  1746  from  the  Mahrattas,  after 
the  defeat  of  the  Bundelas  by  the  combined  forces  of  the  Peshwa  and  Nawab 
Khan  Bangash  of  Farrukhabad.  Belongs  to  a  Bundela  Rajput  family,  and  is 
the  son  of  the  late  Raja  Parachat,  who  died  on  3rd  March  1878. 

Residence. — Jalaun,  North-Western  Provinces. 

GOBIND  SINGH,  THAKUR,  Rao  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence. — Jaipur,  Rajputa~na. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  155 

GODE  NARAYAN  GAJAPATI  RAO,  Rdjd.     See  Gajapati. 

GOGAN  CHANDRA  RAI,  Rat  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  for  eminent 
services  rendered  in  the  Benares  Opium  Department,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Benares,  North- Western  Provinces. 

GOKAL  DAS,  SBTH,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889.  The  Raja 
had  been  created  a  Rao  Saheb  in  1867,  on  account  of  his  liberal  contributions 
towards  the  erection  of  the  Jabalpur  Town  Hall.  His  father  was  Seth  Kushal 
Chand,  a  wealthy  banker  of  Jabalpur,  who  rendered  good  services  during  the 
Mutiny  in  1857;  a  gold  medal  was  presented  to  him  by  the  Government  for 
his  liberal  help  in  fitting  out  the  Madras  Column. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

GOKAL  NARAYAN,  Rai. 

Born  1842.  The  title  is  hereditary  ;  having  been  originally  conferred  by 
the  Nawab  Shuja-ud-daula  Bahadur  on  an  ancestor  of  the  family  named 
Lachmi  Narayan,  Khattri,  who  was  Daroga  of  the  palaces  of  the  Begam. 
The  Rai's  father  was  the  Rai  Baldeo  Narayan,  alias  Chotu  Lai.  The  Rai 
is  also  known  by  the  name  of  Chotu  Lai ;  he  has  three  sons — Babu  Kesri 
Narayan,  Mahabir  Narayan,  and  Badri  Narayan. 
Residence. — Allahabad,  North- Western  Provinces. 

GOKUL  CHANDRA  SINGHI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1825;  son  of  the  late  Babu  Uma  Charan  Singhi,  of  Khishma, 
Nadiya,  Bengal.  Has  rendered  good  service  in  the  Small  Arms  Ammunition 
Factory  at  Dum-Dum;  and  received  the  title  on  the  ist  January  1891,  in 
recognition  thereof.  Belongs  to  a  Kayastha  family  descended  from  Rai 
Lakshman  Singha  of  Chaula,  who  was  the  Gushtipati  or  "  Chief  of  the  clan  " 
among  the  Maulik  Kayasthas.  Muralidhar  Singha  first  settled  in  Khishma  in 
the  beginning  of  the  i7th  century;  and  it  is  stated  that  Raja  Kali  Prasanna 
Singha  of  Calcutta,  translator  of  the  Mahabharata,  is  a  lineal  descendant  of 
this  family.  The  Rai  Bahadur  married  a  daughter  of  the  late  Babu  Chandra 
Nath  Mustafi,  Zamindar  of  Ula  in  Nadiya  District,  whose  ancestors  are  stated 
to  have  held  the  post  of  Accountant-General  under  the  Nawab  Nazims  of 
Bengal.  The  Rai  Bahadur  has  three  sons — Anukul  Chandra  Singha,  born 
1865;  Bankim  Chandra  Singha,  born  1870;  Atul  Chandra  Singha,  born 
1875.  His  eldest  son,  Satis  Chandra  Singha,  is  deceased;  but  has  left  a 
son  and  heir,  Probodh  Chandra  Singha,  born  1881. 

Residences. — Dum-Dum,  near  Calcutta;  173  Cornwallis  Street,  Calcutta; 
Khishma,  Nadiya'  District,  Bengal. 

GOLAK  CHANDAR  CHAUDHRI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Chittagong,  Bengal. 


I56  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


GONDAL,  HIS  HIGHNESS  THAKUR  SAHEB  SIR  BHAG- 
WATSINGHJI  SAGRAMJI,  K.C.I.E.,  Thdkur  Saheb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  24th  October  1865  ;  succeeded  to  \hegadi  i4th  December  1869 
as  a  minor.     Belongs  to  a  Jareja  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  tracing  its  origin  to 

the  renowned  Krishna;  descended  from  the 
Nawanagar-Rajkot  family ;  is  a  Kumbhani,  being 
a  descendant  of  Kumbhoji  I.,  founder  of  the 
Gondal  dynasty ;  was  only  four  years  old  when 
he  succeeded  his  father,  who  died  in  1869, 
when  on  a  visit  to  Bombay.  The  following  is 
a  brief  summary  of  the  history  of  this  ruling 
family:  (i)  Kumbhoji  I.,  founder  of  the  Gon- 
dal dynasty;  1634-49  A.D.  Succeeded  by  his 
son  (2)  Sagramji  I.,  1649-1714  A.D.  Succeeded 
by  his  son  (3)  Haloji,  1714-53.  Succeeded 
by  his  son  (4)  Kumbhoji  II.,  1753-90  A.D.,  was 
a  most  powerful  chief;  was  both  a  warrior  and 
a  statesman,  and  aggrandised  his  possessions  by 
conquest  and  statecraft.  Succeeded  by  his 
grandson  (5)  Muluji,  1790-92  A.D.  Succeeded 
by  his  son  (6)  Dajibhai,  1792-1800  A.D.,  was  a  patron  of  letters,  and  was 
especially  fond  of  poetry.  Succeeded  by  his  uncle  (7)  Devaji,  1800-12  A.D., 
was  a  brave  soldier  and  a  wise  ruler.  Succeeded  by  his  four  sons  one  after 
another — (8)  Nathuji,  1812-14  A.D.  ;  (9)  Kanuji,  1814-21  A.D.  ;  (10) 
Chandra  Sinhji,  1820-41  A.D.  ;  (u)  Bhanabhai,  1841-51  A.D.  ;  (12)  Sag- 
ramji II.,  1851-79  A.D.,  was  a  very  quiet  and  pious  Chief.  Succeeded  by 
his  son,  the  present  Thakur  Saheb.  During  his  minority  the  State  was  at 
first  administered  direct  by  the  British  Government,  but  afterwards  a  Joint- 
Administration  was  introduced.  He  was  educated  at  the  Rajkot  Rajkumar 
College  and  also  at  the  Edinburgh  University.  His  College  career  has  been 
reported  to  be  eminently  successful ;  in  order  to  give  the  finishing  touch  to 
his  education,  he  undertook  a  voyage  to  Europe  in  1883,  in  the  company  of 
Major  (now  Colonel)  Hancock ;  returned  after  six  months  ;  published  an 
account  of  his  tour  under  the  title  "Journal  of  a  Visit  to  England  in  1883  "; 
was  associated  with  Major  (now  Colonel)  Nutt  in  the  administrative  business 
of  his  State,  and  assumed  sole  charge  on  the  24th  August  1884.  The  reply 
made  by  him  on  the  occasion  of  his  installation  to  the  address  of  the  Political 
Agent,  Colonel  West,  was  pronounced  by  Government  to  be  highly  creditable 
to  him,  both  as  regards  the  tone  and  the  matter  of  it,  showing  "  good  feeling 
and  good  taste,  and  his  description  of  his  duties  as  a  ruler  evinces  a  sound 
and  clear  judgment."  Three  years  after  his  installation  the  Thakur  Saheb  was 
publicly  complimented  by  the  Governor,  Lord  Reay,  in  the  following  words : 
"  Thakur  Saheb,  though  you  have  only  been  three  years  on  the  gadi,  I  believe 
you  have  acted  up  to  the  pledges  you  then  gave."  Nominated  a  Fellow  of  the 
Bombay  University  ;  and  a  Vice-President  of  the  Deccan  Education  Society 
at  Poona.  Having  been  imbued  with  a  love  of  science,  he  again  proceeded 
to  Scotland  in  1886,  to  reside  for  a  time  at  the  Edinburgh  University ;  which, 
in  appreciation  of  his  "  exemplary  quest  of  knowledge,"  conferred  on  him  the 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  157 

honorary  degree  of  LL.D.  in  1887.  The  same  year  he  was  requested  to  be 
a  member  of  the  deputation  from  the  Kathiawar  Chiefs  that  waited  on  Her 
Majesty  the  Queen  Empress  at  the  time  of  the  celebration  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty's  Jubilee;  and  on  that  occasion  was  made  a  K.C.I.E. 
Returned  to  India  in  August  1887.  Takes  a  keen  interest  in  the  adminis- 
trative business  of  the  State,  and  is  a  joint-proprietor  of  the  "  Bhaunagar- 
Gondal  "  and  "  Gondal-Porbandar  "  railways,  in  which  concerns  he  has  invested 
about  ^£"500,000.  Is  taking  steps  to  connect  his  capital  with  the  main  line 
of  railway.  Besides  railways,  the  territory  has  many  macadamised  roads, 
schools,  hospitals,  municipalities,  rest-houses,  infirmary,  post  and  telegraph 
offices,  courts  of  justice,  and  other  appliances  of  an  improved  administration. 
Owing  to  the  excellence  of  his  administration,  the  British  Government  was 
pleased  to  raise  Gondal  from  the  rank  of  a  second-class  to  that  of  a  first-class 
State  in  Kathiawar.  In  1889  his  wife — daughter  of  His  Highness  the 
Maharana  of  Dharampur — being  taken  very  ill,  the  doctors  advised  her  to  go 
to  England  for  a  change,  and  His  Highness  was  obliged  to  take  her  there  for 
the  benefit  of  her  health.  This  is  the  first  instance  of  a  Rajput  consort  of  a 
Ruling  Chief  ever  venturing  to  overcome  her  caste  prejudices.  Her  Highness 
was  received .  by  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress,  and 
personally  invested  with  the  Imperial  Order  of  the  Crown  of  India.  The 
Thakur  Saheb  has  contributed  numerous  donations  to  deserving  public 
institutions  ;  has  relieved  his  subjects  of  the  burden  of  many  obnoxious 
taxes,  and  remitted  a  vast  amount  of  debt  which  his  people  owed  him.  His 
subjects,  in  return,  have  voted  him  a  statue  by  public  subscription. 

Arms. — A  belt  and  sword  with  the  word  "  Gondal  "  at  the  top.  Motto. — 
(Sanskrit)  Sajyam  cha  Satyam,  in  Devanagari  character,  meaning  "Ready 
and  True."  His  Highness's  sons  are  —  Kuma'r  Shri  Bhojraj,  heir -apparent, 
born  1883  ;  is  being  educated  in  Edinburgh.  Kuma'r  Shri  Bhupat  Sinhje,  born 
1888  ;  is  in  England  with  his  parents. 

Residence. — Gondal,  Ka"thia~wdr,  Bombay. 


,5g  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

GOPAL  CHANDAR  MUKHARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence. — C  alcutta. 

GOPAL  CHANDRA  MUKHARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Has  rendered  good  service  as  Chairman  of  the  Kasipur-Chitpur  Muni- 
cipality, Calcutta;  and  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th 
May  1892. 

Residence. — Calcutta. 

GOPAL  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1884. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

GOPAL  MOHAN  SARKAR,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1887. 
Residence. — Calcutta. 

GOPAL  RAO  (of  Rehli),  Rao. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  the  son  of  the  late  Rao  Kishen  Rao ;  and 
descended  from  Govind  Pandit,  who  came  to  Sagar  with  the  Mahratta  ruler 
from  Puna,  and  being  a  relative  of  the  latter,  was  made  Mdmlatddr  of  Rehli. 

Residence. — Sagar,  Central  Provinces. 


GOPAL  RAO,  PANDIT,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  6th  August  1832.  The  title  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  for  eminent  public  services.  His  ancestors,  during 
the  Mahratta  Government,  held  the  post  of  Secretary  to  the  Raja  of  Sagar 
for  three  generations  ;  and  consequently  his  father  and  grandfather  received 
political  pensions  from  the  British  Government  after  the  annexation.  The 
Rao  Bahadur  himself  rendered  excellent  service  to  Government  at  the  risk 
of  his  life  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  for  which  he  received  the  grant  of  two 
villages  in  the  Jalaun  district  for  his  life.  His  family  is  Dakhini  Brahman. 

Residence. — Jhansi,  North-Western  Provinces. 


GOPAL  RAO  HARI  DESHMUKH,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  1 8th  February  1823.  The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  Educated  at  Puna.  Served  the 
Government  with  the  highest  success  and  distinction  from  1844  to  1879, 
when  he  retired  after  occupying  the  place  of  Joint  Judge  and  Sessions  Judge 
of  Nasik,  and  other  high  positions  in  the  Judicial  Service.  Invited  to  be 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  159 

present  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  1877.  Granted  revival  of 
political  pension  in  1877.  Member  of  Bombay  Legislative  Council,  1880. 
Name  entered  in  the  list  of  First -Class  Sardars  of  the  Deccan  for  rank  and 
precedence,  1881.  Appointed  Prime  Minister  of  Ratlam  (^.z>.),  1884.  Has 
been  a  prominent  social  reformer,  having  been  put  out  of  caste  for  ten 
years  for  his  advocacy  of  widow  remarriage,  and  for  sending  his  second 
son,  Krishnarao  Gopal,  to  England  for  education.  Is  a  copious  author, 
acquainted  with  many  languages,  and  writing  under  the  nom-de-plume  of 
Lokahitawddi.  Is  President  of  the  Bombay  Branch  of  the  Theosophical 
Society,  Bombay  Arya  Samaj,  Puna  Arbitration  Court ;  and  Vice-President  of 
the  National  Indian  Association.  Is  descended  from  Vishwanath  Sidhaye,  a 
Deshmukh  (hereditary  farmer  of  the  revenue),  1690-1717,  many  of  whose 
descendants  held  high  office  under  the  Government  of  the  Peshwa. 
Residence. — Puna,  Bombay. 

GOPAL  RAO  SHIVDBO  (of  Malegaon),  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  2 gth  June  1843.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally 
conferred  by  the  Peshwa.  The  Rao  Bahadur's  mother  enjoys  a  pension 
from  the  Government. 

Residence. — Ndsik,  Bombay. 


GOPALA  CHARIYA  KRADKAR,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
in  recognition  of  his  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take 
rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Gwalior,  Central  India. 

GOPALA  PADHYB  GURJAR,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
in  recognition  of  his  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take 
rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Ratnagiri,  Bombay. 

GOPALA,  P.,  RAO,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  1856.  Member  of  the  Berhampur  Municipal  Council,  1884; 
Chairman,  1887.  Granted  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  in  1891  for  his 
eminent  municipal  services. 

Residence. — Berhampur,  Ganjam,  Madras. 

GOPALJI  SURBHAI  DBSAI,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  24th  June  1832.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i3th  January  1882, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  for  eminent  public  services  in  the  Educational 
Service,  which  extended  from  1853  to  1892.  Is  a  son  of  Desai  Surbhai 
Dayalji  of  Puni,  Surat,  an  important  Zaminddr  in  that  district.  Received  the 
title  of  Rao  Saheb  in  1864;  and  the  sanad  conferring  the  title  of  Rao 


160  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Bahadur  in  1882  was  delivered  to  him  in  full  Darbar  by  the  Political  Agent 
at  Bhaunagar.  Has  received  the  thanks  of  Government  for  his  services  (in 
conjunction  with  his  father)  in  bringing  about  the  settlement  of  Wattans  in 
Surat ;  also  in  connection  with  archaeological  researches  in  Kathiawar,  and 
with  the  settlement  of  the  wording  of  the  "  Fashzamin  "  bonds  entered  into 
by  the  Kathiawar  Chiefs.  Appointed  Fellow  of  the  Bombay  University,  1885  ; 
Educational  Inspector,  Northern  Division,  Bombay  Presidency,  1885.  Is 
President  of  the  Kathiawar  General  Library,  Rajkot ;  a  Life  Member  of  the 
East  India  Association,  and  of  the  Gujarat  Vernacular  Society. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 

GOPI  MAL,  Rai. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3ist  May  1871. 
Residence. — Firozpur,  Punjab. 

^GOPINATH  GURU,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Kdlahandi,  Central  Provinces. 

GOVARDHAN  SINGH  (of  Ramgarh),  Mian. 

The  title  is  hereditary  in  this  branch  of  the  family.  The  head  of  another 
branch  of  the  same  family  is  Sardar  Ranjit  Singh  (q.v.\  who  holds  the  hereditary 
title  of  Sardar.  Descended  from  a  Rajput  family,  whose  great  ancestor  was 
Raja  Singar  Chand,  Raja  of  Bilaspur  (Kahlur).  His  younger  son  was  Kalal 
Chand,  tenth  in  descent  from  whom  was  Surat  Singh,  whose  four  sons,  with 
their  retainers,  aided  the  Raja  of  Nahan  to  conquer  Suchawar,  Ramgarh,  and 
other  territories,  and  received  Ramgarh  as  their  share.  Sardar  Khushal 
Singh  was  the  only  one  of  the  four  who  left  any  children.  He  built  the  fort 
at  Ramgarh  ;  and  his  grandson,  Gopal  Singh,  was  the  grandfather  of  Mian 
Govardhan  Singh. 

Residence. — Ambala,  Punjab. 

GOVIND  LAL  RAI,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is   personal,   and  was   conferred  on    2nd  January    1888,   in 
recognition  of  the  Raja's  "  liberality  and  public  spirit." 
Residence. — Rangpur,  Bengal. 

GOVIND  RAO  (of  Jaisinghnagar),  Rao. 

Born  1841.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by 
the  old  Mahratta  Government,  and  subsequently  recognised  by  the  Govern- 
ment of  India.  The  Rao,  like  his  kinsmen,  Rao  Ganpat  Rao  (g.v.)  and 
Rao  Ram  Chand  Rao  of  Jaisinghnagar,  is  descended  from  ancestors  who 
were  connected  with  the  former  rulers  of  Sagar;  and  to  one  of  them, 
named  Rao  Ganpat  Rao,  the  pargand  of  Jaisinghnagar  was  made  over  as 
its  talukdar. 

Residence. — Sdgar,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  161 

GOVIND  RAO  (of  Rehli),  Rao. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  a  younger  brother  of  Rao  Gopal  Rao  of 
Rehli  (g.v.) 

Residence. — Rehli,  Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

GOVIND  SAKARAM  HOSUR,  Rao  Saheb. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893,  for  eminent 
municipal  services.     Is  Vice-President  of  the  Saundatti  Municipality,  Bombay. 
Residence. — Saundatti,  Belgaum,  Bombay. 

GOVINDRAO  RAMCHANDRA  GARUD,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1887. 
Residence. — Dhulia,  Bombay. 

GUL  HASAN  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

GULAB  SINGH  (of  Meanoni),  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

GULAB  SINGH  (of  Bina),  Rao. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

GUNABHIRAM  SARMA  BARUA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's 
reign. 

Residence. — Nowgong,  Assam. 

GUR  SAHAI,  LALA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — P  unj  ab. 

GURBAKHSH  SINGH  (of  Kot  Shera),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Gujra'nwa'la,  Punjab. 

GURU  PRASAD,  PANDIT  (of  Benares)  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
in  recognition  of  his  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take 
rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

M 


1 62  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

GWALIOR,  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  Sindhia  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1877  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  3rd  July  1886.  Is  the 
head  of  the  great  Mahratta  House  of  Sindhia.  Full  title  is — "  His  Highness 
Mukhtar-ul-Mulk,  Azim-ul-Iktidar  Rafi-ush-Shan  Wala  Shikoh  Muhtashaim-i- 
Dauran,  Umdat-ul-Umara,  Maharaj-Adhiraj  Alijah  Hisam-us-Saltanat  Maharaja 
Madho  Rao  Sindhia  Bahadur  Srinath  Mansur-i-Zaman,  Fidwi-i-Hazrat-i- 
Malika-i-Muaz-zama-i-Rafi-ud-Darja-i-Inglistan"  (see  Introduction,  §  n).  His 
Highness,  who  rules  over  an  area  about  equal  to  that  of  Holland,  Belgium, 
and  Saxony  combined,  and  over  a  population  more  numerous  than  that  of 
Switzerland  or  of  Greece,  is  descended  from  the  famous  Ranoji  Sindhia,  the 
son  of  a  Dekhani  pdtel,  who  became  a  member  of  the  household  of  the 
Peshwa  Balaji  Rao,  and  subsequently  a  successful  commander  of  the  Peshwa's 
cavalry.  Ranoji  Sindhia  was  succeeded  by  his  second  son,  Mahadaji  Sindhia, 
who  was  one  of  the  greatest  soldiers  and  cleverest  statesmen  ever  produced 
by  India.  He  greatly  distinguished  himself  at  the  battle  of  Panipat  in  1761  ; 
and,  taught  by  that  disaster,  he  disciplined  and  strongly  organised  his  army, 
chiefly  under  French  officers,  and  in  this  way,  though  nominally  still  a  servant 
of  the  Peshwa,  he  became  in  1764  really  the  ruler  of  Hindustan.  He  died 
in  1794,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  grand-nephew,  Daulat  Rao  Sindhia, 
whose  reign  of  over  thirty  years  is  part  of  the  history  of  India.  The  battles 
of  Assaye,  won  by  Sir  Arthur  Wellesley  (afterwards  Duke  of  Wellington)  in 
1803,  and  of  Laswari,  won  by  General  Lord  Lake,  in  1804,  the  Treaty  of 
Sarji  Anjangaon  in  1805,  and  the  Pindari  war  in  1817  are  important  land- 
marks in  the  career  of  Daulat  Rao  Sindhia.  On  his  death  he  commended 
his  State  and  his  younger  widow,  the  famous  Baiza  Bai,  to  the  care  of  the 
British  Government.  Jhankuji  Sindhia  subsequently  succeeded  to  the  gadi 
by  adoption,  marrying  the  grand-daughter  of  Baiza  Bai,  who  was  at  first  regent 
of  the  State.  Family  dissension,  however,  ensued ;  Baiza  Bai  had  to  leave 
Gwalior  in  1833,  and  Jhankuji  Sindhia  died  without  issue  in  1843.  His 
widow  adopted  a  young  scion  of  the  Sindhia  family,  who  succeeded  under 
the  title  of  Jaiaji  Rao  Sindhia.  He  displayed  great  courage  and  loyalty 
during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  when  his  army  revolted  to  the  mutineers,  and  he 
himself  and  his  Minister,  Sir  Dinkar  Rao,  were  compelled  to  flee  to  Agra. 
He  was  restored  and  brought  back  to  Gwalior  by  Sir  Hugh  Rose  on  iQth 
June  1858,  and  received  many  great  and  well-deserved  honours  during  the 
rest  of  his  long  reign.  He  obtained  the  right  of  adoption,  numerous  titles, 
extensive  grants  of  additional  territory,  and  an  increase  to  his  army ;  and 
became  successively  an  Honorary  General  in  the  British  army,  a  Knight 
Grand  Cross  of  the  Bath,  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Star  of  India, 
and  a  Companion  of  the  Indian  Empire.  The  present  Maharaja,  Madho 
Rao  Sindhia  Bahadur,  succeeded  as  a  minor  in  1886.  The  family  colour, 
famous  on  so  many  battle-fields,  is  bhagwd,  orange  or  brick-red,  the  flag  of 
that  colour  bearing  on  its  field  the  representation  of  a  serpent  holding  the 
sun  and  moon  in  its  coils — referring  to  a  legend  that  Ranoji  Sindhia,  when 
an  infant,  was  sheltered  from  the  heat  of  the  sun  by  the  expanded  hood  of  a 
cobra.  The  area  of  the  State  is  29,046  square  miles ;  its  population 
3,030,743,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  more  than  160,000  Muhammadans, 
12,000  Jains,  and  167,000  aborigines  of  various  tribes.  The  Maharaja 
Sindhia  maintains  a  military  force  of  5504  cavalry,  11,040  infantry,  and  48 
guns.  His  Highness  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  19  guns,  and  within  the 
limits  of  Gwalior  territory  to  a  salute  of  2 1  guns. 
Residence. — Gwalior,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  163 

GTYANODA  KANT  RAI,  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  July  1888. 
Residence. — Jessore,  Bengal. 

HABIB  KHAN,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal. 
Residence. — Peshdwar,  Punjab. 

HABIB-UR-RAHMAN,  KAZI,  Khan  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Burhdnpur,  Central  Provinces. 

HACHARAO  AKBAT  HARIHAR,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Belgaum,  Bombay. 

HADI  HUSAIN  KHAN,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1878. 
Residence. — Delhi,  Punjab. 

HADOL,  Thdkur  of.     See  Harol. 

HAFIZ  ABDUL  KARIM,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1838.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  in  1884  for  services 
rendered  by  his  ancestors,  and  for  his  own  acts  of  public  generosity.  His 
father  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Bharatpur,  Kamon,  and  Shekhawati  in  the 
first  Kabul  campaign  ;  and  his  brother  was  rewarded  with  a  khilat  for  his  good 
services  in  the  first  and  second  Punjab  wars. 

Residence. — Meerut,  North- Western  Provinces. 

HAIDAR  ALI  KHAN  walad  ALI  AKBAR  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

HAKIM  KHAN,  MALIK,  Khdn  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Shdhpur,  Punjab. 


164  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


HAKK  NAWAZ  KHAN  (of  Dera  Ismail  Khan,  Punjab), 

Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  8th  May  1885. 
Residence. — Baluchistan. 


HALARI  SHAMANA,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  May  1885. 
Residence. — Mercara,  Coorg. 

HAMID  ALI,  MUNSHI.     See  Muhammad  Hamid  Ali. 

HAMID  HUSAIN,  MAUL  AVI  SAYYID,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign.  It  entitles 
him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — North- Western  Provinces  and  Oudh. 

HAMIR  SINGH  (of  Bayeri),  Thdkur  Sawai  Rai. 

Born  1838.  The  title  is  hereditary,  but  its  origin  is  not  known.  Is  a 
Korkars  Girassia  Chief.  Rendered  assistance  to  the  Magistrate  of  Harda 
during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  for  which  he  received  a  khilat.  Has  two  sons — 
Thakur  Umrao  Singh  and  Thakur  Sardar  Singh. 

Residence. — Hoshangabad,  Central  Provinces. 

HAMIR  SINGH  (of  Mohli),   Thdkur. 

Born  7th  August  1825.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  con- 
ferred by  the  Raja  of  Benares.  Belongs  to  the  same  family  as  that  of  the 
Rajas  of  Hatisi  in  Damoh  district,  Central  Provinces.  This  branch  of  the 
family  obtained  the  jdgir  of  Mohli  from  the  former  Government  of  Sagar. 
Has  two  sons — Kunwar  Khalak  Singh  and  Mohan  Singh. 

Residence. — Sa~gar,  Central  Provinces. 

HAMIR  SINGH  (of  Pali),  Rao. 

Born  1823.  The  title  is  hereditary.  This  Bundela  Chief  belongs  to  the 
family  of  the  ex-Raja  of  Banpur,  whose  estates  were  confiscated  after  the 
Mutiny  of  1857.  His  son  and  heir  is  Nirbhai  Singh,  aged  thirty-one  years. 

Residence. — Banpur,  Lalitpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 

HANUMAN  SINGH  (of  Barwara),   Thdkur. 

Born  1841.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  on 
his  ancestors  by  the  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla,  Raja  Nizam  Shah.  Is  an 
Honorary  Magistrate  of  Jabalpur  district. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  165 

HAP  A,  THAKUR  WAKHATSINGHJI,   Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1877  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  4th  August  1889.  Belongs  to  a  Koli 
(Hindu)  family.  Is  at  present  a  minor,  and  the  State  under  the  management 
of  the  Mahi  Kantha  Agency.  The  late  Thakur  was  named  Madhusinghji, 
and  his  widow,  the  Thakurani  Surajbai,  is  living.  The  State  contains  an 
area  of  79  square  miles,  and  a  population  of  1546,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Hapa,  Mdhi  Kcintha,  Bombay. 


HARBALLABH  NARAYAN  SINGH  (of  Sonbarsa),  Maharaja. 

Born  7th  June  1846.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd 
January  1888.  The  Maharaja  had  received  the  title  of  Raja  in  1875  f°r 
eminent  services  rendered  during  the  famine  of  1873-74,  and  had  been 
granted  the  title  of  Raja  Bahadur  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of 
the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 
Created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire, 
2nd  January  1893.  The  family  cognisance  is  a  flag,  bearing  on  it  the 
figure  of  an  elephant. 

Residence. — Bhcigalpur,  Bengal. 


HARBANS  RAI  (of  Hatri),  JRdjd. 

Born  7th  April  1835.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  is  said  to  have  been 
first  conferred  by  a  Muhammadan  King,  in  1494-95,  on  the  Raja  Sahal  Shah 
of  Bakhtiyargarh.  Succeeded  the  late  Raja  on  8th  May  1848.  Rendered 
good  service  to  Government  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  Has  two  sons,  of 
whom  the  elder  enjoys  the  title  of  Diwan — Diwan  Kishori  Singh  and  Bhan 
Partab  Singh. 

Residence. — Damoh,  Central  Provinces. 


HARBANS  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

Born  1846.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Raja  being  the  brother  and  the 
adopted  son  of  the  famous  Sardar  Tej  Singh,  who  was  Commander-in-Chief 
of  the  Sikhs  in  the  first  Sikh  war,  subsequently  appointed  President  of  the 
Council  of  Regency,  and  on  7th  August  1847  created  Raja  of  Sialkot. 
Throughout  the  rebellion  of  1848-49  the  Raja  Tej  Singh  remained  faithful  to 
the  Government,  and  on  the  annexation  of  the  Punjab  the  jdgirs  of  himself 
and  his  cousin,  Sardar  Bhagwan  Singh,  son  of  Jamadar  Khushal  Singh,  were 
confirmed  for  life.  Raja  Tej  Singh  rendered  excellent  service  by  raising 
horsemen  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  as  a  reward,  in  1862,  two-thirds  of 
his  jdgir  was  granted  in  perpetuity,  and  he  received  a  sanad  authorising  him 
to  adopt  an  heir.  He  died  in  December  1862,  having  adopted  his  brother, 
the  Raja  Harbans  Singh,  who  now  enjoys  the  title  and  estate. 

Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 


166  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


HARBANS  SINGH  (of  Kandaula),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  belonging  to  the  same  family  as  those 
of  the  Sardars  Tara  Singh  of  Manauli,  Uttam  Singh  of  Ghanauli,  and  other 
Sardars  of  the  Ambala  division.  The  founder  of  the  family  was  Sardar 
Khushal  Singh,  who  achieved  conquests  in  the  Manjha,  and  took  possession 
of  the  town  of  Jalandhar.  In  1756  A.D.  he  had  large  Cis-Sutlej  possessions ; 
they  were  subsequently  wrested  from  the  family  by  the  Maharaja  Ranjit 
Singh  of  Lahore,  but  ultimately  came  under  British  control  with  the  other 
Cis-Sutlej  territories.  Sardar  Dayal  Singh,  the  grandson  of  Sardar  Khushal 
Singh,  succeeded  to  the  Kandaula  estates,  and  his  grandson  is  the  present 
Sardar.  For  services  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857  the  Sardars  of  this  loyal 
family  received  large  remissions  from  the  Government. 

Residence. — Kandaula,  Ambala,  Punjab. 

HARDERAM  ANUPRAM  MUNSHI,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  December  1888. 
Residence. — B  ombay . 

HARDHIAN  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893.  Is  an 
Honorary  Magistrate  of  Delhi. 

Residence. — Delhi,  North- Western  Provinces. 

HARDIT  SINGH  (of  Dayalgarh),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Ambdla,  Punjab. 

HARDIT  SINGH,  ROZA,   Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary ;  and  Sardar  Hardit  Singh  succeeded  his  father, 
the  brave  and  loyal  Sardar  Kahan  Singh,  in  June  1864.  Sardar  Kahan 
Singh  was  the  grandson  of  Tek  Singh,  who  was  in  the  service  of  the  Bhangi 
Sardars  of  Lahore,  and  received  from  them  the  grant  of  the  village  Nodhpur. 
Kahan  Singh  entered  the  service  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  in  1822; 
and,  on  the  recommendation  of  General  Ventura,  was  appointed  Com- 
mandant in  the  Life  Guards,  served  with  his  regiment  in  Kulu,  Mandi,  and 
elsewhere,  and  being  severely  wounded  in  the  attack  on  Raja  Suchet  Singh, 
was  promoted  to  be  Colonel,  with  large  emoluments.  He  fought  on  the 
Sikh  side  in  the  battles  of  Sobraon  and  Firuzshahr.  After  the  annexation 
Colonel  Kahan  Singh  lost  his  jdgirs,  but  was  granted  a  pension  by  the 
British  Government.  When  the  Mutiny  broke  out  in  1857  .he  was  one  of 
the  first  Chiefs  selected  for  service  by  Sir  John  Lawrence,  and,  starting  at 
once  for  Delhi  with  fifty-three  of  his  retainers,  he  served  with  the  Guides  till 
the  fall  of  the  city,  being  again  severely  wounded  in  one  of  the  rebel  sallies. 
For  these  services  he  received  substantial  rewards  from  the  Government,  in- 
cluding the  regrant  of  some  of  his  old  Sikh  jdgirs. 

Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  167 


HARBNDRA  KISHOR  SINGH,  Maharaja  Sir,  K.CJ.E.     See  Bettiah. 

HARI  APPAJI,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Baroda. 

HARI  CHAND  (of  Lahaul),  Thdkur. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Lahaul,  Kangra,  Punjab. 

HARI  CHAND  (of  Bhabaur),  Rai. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Rai  belongs  to  the  same  family  as  that  of 
the  Rajas  of  Kangra,  Jaswan,  Goler,  Siba,  Datarpur,  etc.  ;  being  descended 
from  Raja  Pirthi  Chand,  son  of  Raja  Beni  Chand.  The  Rai  Karm  Chand, 
in  the  time  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh,  held  a  large  jdgir  in  this  district  ; 
and  his  grandson,  Rai  Ratan  Chand,  died  24th  October  1884,  and  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  son,  the  present  Rai. 

Residence. — Bhabaur,  Hoshi£rpur,  Punjab. 

HARI  CHAND  YAJOJI,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

HARI  CHARAN  SARMA,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3rd  October  1872. 
Residence. — Cachar,  Assam. 

HARI  MOHAN  THAKUR,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  July  1888. 
Residence. — Bhcigalpur,  Bengal. 

HARI  NARAYAN  KALE,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Ratnagiri,  Bombay. 

HARI  RAJ  SINGH  (of  Kashipur),  Rdjd. 

Born  1857.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  family  connected 
with  that  of  the  Chand  Rajas  of  Kumaun,  being  descended  from  Pahar 
Singh,  a  younger  son  of  Raja  Baz  Bahadur  Singh,  Raja  of  Kumaun  from 
1638  to  1678.  In  the  time  of  Raja  Dip  Chand  of  Kumaun  (1748-77), 
Mohan  Singh,  grandson  of  Pahar  Singh,  became  Bakshi  or  head  of  the 
army.  He  eventually  seized  and  imprisoned  Raja  Dip  Chand,  and,  on  the 
death  of  the  latter  in  prison  in  1777,  proclaimed  himself  Raja  under  the 


168  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

title  of  Mohan  Chand.  He  himself  was  killed  in  1788  by  Harak  Deb 
Toshi,  who  again  was  driven  out  by  Lai  Singh,  brother  of  Mohan  Singh, 
with  the  aid  of  Faiz-ullah  Khan  of  Rampur.  Mahendra  Singh,  son  of 
Mohan  Singh,  was  installed  as  Raja  by  Lai  Singh,  who  claimed  for  him  the 
protection  of  the  Nawab  of  Oudh,  as  recognised  owner  of  the  Tarai.  In 
1790,  however,  the  Gurkhalis  from  Kathmandu  invaded  Kumaun  and 
defeated  the  forces  of  Mahendra  Singh,  who  fled  with  his  uncle,  Lai  Singh, 
to  Kota,  and  fixed  upon  Kilpuri  as  his  headquarters,  where  he  endeavoured 
to  enlist  troops  for  an  attack  upon  Kumaun.  Hearing  this,  the  Gurkhali 
general,  Amar  Singh  Thapa,  marched  on  Kilpuri  and  thus  deprived  the. 
Kumaunis  of  their  only  rallying-point.  Mahendra  Singh  and  his  partisans, 
deprived  of  every  acre  that  they  could  lay  claim  to,  fled  to  the  Oudh 
Subahdar,  and  representing  that  the  tract  from  which  the  Gurkhali  had 
ousted  them  formed  a  part  of  the  Tarai,  which  of  right  belonged  to  the 
Nawab,  requested  his  aid  in  recovering  it  from  the  Gurkhalis.  A  war  with 
Nepal  would  probably  have  resulted  had  not  the  good  offices  of  Mr.  Cherry 
promoted  an  understanding,  by  which  the  Gurkhalis  agreed  to  yield  up  all 
pretensions  to  the  low  country.  At  the  same  time  provision  was  made  for 
the  retention  by  the  exiled  family  of  some  doubtful  tenure  of  a  portion  of 
the  Tarai  for  their  subsistence.  Mahendra  Singh  retired  first  to  Rudrapur 
and  then  to  Kilpuri;  but,  owing  to  bad  management,  this  Pargana  was 
reduced  to  a  swamp,  and  was  rendered  so  unhealthy  that  on  the  petition  of 
the  representatives  of  the  family  to  the  British  Government,  it  was  exchanged 
for  the  confirmation  of  possession  in  taluqa  Chachait  in  the  Pilibhit  district. 
Kunwar  Partab  Singh,  son  of  Mahendra  Singh,  sued  his  uncle,  Lai  Singh, 
for  a  share  in  Chachait,  but  his  claim  was  dismissed.  He  then  petitioned 
the  Government,  who  gave  him  Rs.25o  per  mensem  in  1820.  Partab 
Singh's  claim  to  Bazpur  was  also  negatived.  Lai  Singh  had  held  possession 
as  head  of  the  family  and  retained  it.  Guman  Singh,  son  of  Raja  Lai 
Singh,  received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1828,  as  Raja.  His 
son,  Raja  Shiuraj  Singh,  C.S.I.,  rendered  good  service  during  the  Mutiny  of 
1857  ;  and  was  rewarded  with  the  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  and  with  an 
increased  grant.  He  died  in  October  1886;  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
the  present  Raja,  who  married  a  daughter  of  Kupendra  Bikram  Singh  of 
Nepal,  and  has  a  son  named  Kunwar  Udai  Raj  Singh.  The  Raja  is  an 
Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Kashipur,  Tara"i,  North- Western  Provinces. 


HARI  RAOJI  CHIPLUNKAR,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

HARI  SINGH  (of  Nadaun),  Mian. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Mian  is  a  brother  of  Raja  Amar  Chand  of 
Nadaun,  and  a  younger  son  of  the  Raja  Sir  Jodhbir  Singh,  brother-in-law  of 
the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore,  who  died  in  1873.  The  Mian  is  an 
Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  of  the  Punjab. 

Residence. — Nadaun,  Ka~ngra,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  169 


HARI  SINGH,  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.       Is  one  of  the  Sikh  Sardars  of  the  Ludhiana 
district,  Punjab. 

Residence. — Ludhidna,  Punjab. 

HARI  SINGH  (of  Pindit  Lala),  Sarddr. 

•       The  title  is  hereditary.     The  Sardar  is  one  of  the  Sardars  of  the  Gujrat 
district,  Punjab. 

Residence. — Gujrat,  Punjab. 

HARI  SINGH  (of  Akalgarh),  Diwdn. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Gujranwala,  Punjab. 

HARI  SINGH,  SARDAR,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Sialkot,  Punjab. 


HARIHAR  DATT  DUBE  (of  Badlapur),  Rdjd. 

Born  1856.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  family  of  Dube 
Brahmans,  who  came  originally  from  Amauli  in  the  Fatehpur  district,  where 
their  ancestor,  Sheo  Lai,  was  an  eminent  banker.  In  1788  Sheo  Lai  Dube 
was  appointed  farmer  of  the  revenues  of  Jaunpur  by  Mr.  Jonathan  Duncan, 
the  Resident  at  Benares ;  and  obtained  the  title  of  Raja  for  killing  a  noted 
rebel  named  Saltanat  Singh.  The  sanad  conferring  the  tdluka  of  Badlapur 
on  Raja  Sheo  Lai  Dube,  dated  November  1797,  is  in  existence,  and  was 
signed  by  Sir  John  Shore,  then  Governor-General.  The  present  Raja  is  a 
great-grandson  of  Raja  Sheo  Lai  Dube,  and  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Jaunpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


HARIHAR  SHASTRI  DRAVIDA,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
in  recognition  of  his  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take 
rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 

HARILAL  AMBASHANKAR,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1879. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 


170  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


HARINDAR  SINGH  (of  Kandaula),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary ;  the  Sardar  belongs  to  the  same  family  as  those 
of  the  Sardars  Tara  Singh  of  Manauli,  Uttam  Singh  of  Ghanauli,  and 
other  Sardars  of  the  Ambala  division.  For  an  account  of  the  Kandaula 
branch  of  this  family,  see  Harbans  Singh  (of  Kandaula),  Sardar.  The 
Sardar  is  a  grandson  of  Sardar  Dayal  Singh  of  Kandaula. 

Residence. — Kandaula,  Ambdla,  Punjab. 

HARISH  CHANDRA  MITTRA,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

HARNAM  SINGH,  AHLUWALLA,  Kunwdr,  C.LE. 

Born  i Qth  January  1851.  Is  a  son  of  His  late  Highness  the  Raja  Sir 
Randhir  Singh,  G. C.S.I.,  of  Kapurthala,  and  only  brother  of  the  late  Raja 
Kharak  Singh  of  Kapurthala,  and  uncle  of  the  present  Raja  of  Kapurthala 
(q.v.)  Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire  on  ist  January  1885. 

Residence. — Kapurthala,  Punjab. 

HARNAM  SINGH  (of  Kharar),  Sarddr. 

Born  1857.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Khatri  family,  whose 
ancestor,  Sardar  Dayal  Singh,  took  possession  of  considerable  territory  in  the 
Hoshiarpur,  Firozpur,  and  Ambala  districts.  His  sons  were  deprived  of 
much  of  their  land  by  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh ;  but  the  eldest,  named 
Sardar  Dharm  Singh,  secured  some  lands  in  Kharar,  Ambala  district.  His 
grandsqn,  Sardar  Ganda  Singh,  rendered  excellent  services  during  the  Mutiny 
of  1857,  and  received  a  khilat  from  the  Government  in  acknowledgment 
thereof.  He  died  at  Patiala  about  the  year  1876;  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  son,  the  present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Amba"la,  Punjab. 

HARNAM  SINGH  (of  Lidhran),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Ludhidna,  Punjab. 

HARNAM  SINGH  (of  Moron),  Sarddr. 

Born  1 86 1.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  that  came 
originally  from  Varpal,  in  the  Amritsar  district.  About  1759  Sardar  Salig 
Singh  obtained  possession  of  territory  around  Moron.  The  family  fell  under 
the  power  of  the  Maharaja  Sher  Singh ;  but  when  the  Jalandhar  doab  was 
ceded  to  the  British  after  the  first  Sikh  war,  a  considerable  jdgir  was  con- 
firmed to  the  head  of  the  family  in  perpetuity,  and  is  now  enjoyed  by  Sardar 
Harnam  Singh. 

Residence. — Jalandhar,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  171 


HARNARAYAN  SINGH  (of  Hathras),  Rdjd. 

Born  Qth  December  1864.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
ist  January  1877,  as  a  continuation  of  the  title  of  the  Raja's  adoptive  father, 
Raja  Gobind  Singh  of  Hathras.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  whose  founder, 
named  Makhan,  came  from  Raj  putana  about  the  year  1600,  and  settled  in  the 
neighbourhood  of  Mursan.  His  great-grandson,  Thakur  Nand  Ram,  died 
in  1696,  leaving  fourteen  sons,  of  whom  one  was  Zulkaran  Singh,  ancestor 
of  Raja  Ghansham  Singh  of  Mursan  (q.v.\  and  the  other  was  Jai  Singh. 
The  great-grandson  of  the  latter,  Thakur  Daya  Ram,  established  himself  as 
an  independent  Chief  in  his  fortress  of  Hathras,  at  that  time  one  of  the 
strongest  in  the  country.  The  fortress  was,  however,  captured  by  General 
Marshall  in  1817,  and  the  Thakur's  estates  confiscated.  The  latter,  on  his 
death  in  1841,  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Thakur  Gobind  Singh.  He 
distinguished  himself  by  most  valuable  services  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857  ; 
and  was  rewarded  in  1858,  by  Lord  Canning  on  behalf  of  Her  Majesty,  with 
the  title  of  Raja  and  extensive  grants  of  land.  Raja  Gobind  Singh  was 
succeeded  by  his  adopted  son,  the  present  Raja ;  who  is  an  Honorary 
Magistrate. 

Residence. — Aligarh,  North- Western  Provinces. 


HARNATH  CHAUDHRI  (of  Dubalhati),  Rdjd  Bahadur. 

Born  1833.  Is  the  son  of  the  late  Anandanath  Rai,  of  Dubalhati  in  the 
district  of  Rajshahi,  Bengal  \  who  was  descended  through  a  long  line  of 
ancestors  from  Kasiram  Rai.  The  title  of  Raja  Bahadur  was  conferred  as  a 
personal  distinction  on  the  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  The  Raja 
Bahadur  had  received  the  title  of  Raja  on  the  i2th  of  March  1875,  m  recog- 
nition of  his  eminent  services  during  the  famine  of  1873-74. 

Residence. — Rajshdhi,  Bengal. 


HARO  SUNDARI  DBBIA  (of  Siarsol),  Mahdrdni. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India.  The  Maharani  had  already  received  the  title  of  Rani  on  i2th  March 
1875,  f°r  ner  eminent  services  during  the  famine  of  1873-74.  Belongs  to  a 
family  descended  from  Govinda  Prasad  Pandit. 

Residence. — Bardwan,  Bengal. 


HAROL,  THAKUR  JAWANSINGHJI,  Thakur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1883  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  22nd  March  1888.  Belongs  to  a 
Thakerda  (Hindu)  family.  The  State  contains  a  population  of  nearly  3000, 
chiefly  Hindus.  Its  name  is  also  spelt  Hadol. 

Residence. — Harol,  Mdhi  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 


172 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


HARSA  SINGH  (of  Mughalchak),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  an  ancient  Sikh  family,  famous  for 
the  conspicuous  bravery  of  its  members.  Sardar  Anup  Singh,  of  Probyn's 
Horse,  was  one  of  the  most  distinguished  officers  in  the  army  throughout  the 
Mutiny  campaigns  of  1857,  1858,  and  1859.  He  was  present  at  the  fall  of 
Delhi,  at  the  capture  of  Lucknow,  and  on  many  other  great  occasions ;  was 
four  times  wounded,  and  had  three  horses  wounded  under  him.  He  also 
fought  with  great  distinction  in  the  China  campaign  in  1860,  and  subse- 
quently in  the  disturbances  on  the  north-west  frontier.  He  twice  received 
the  Order  of  Valour  for  bravery  in  the  field.  In  1876  he  accompanied  His 
Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales  to  England,  and  was  honoured  with  the 
marked  approval  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress  and 
the  Royal  Family.  He  died  in  1885,  amid  universal  expressions  of  regret, 
and  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Mughal  Chak,  Gujra"nwala,  Punjab. 


HASAN  ALI  BEY  BPPBNDI, 
Khan  Bahadur. 

Is  a  leading  member  of  the  Karachi  Bar, 
and  was  in  1886  appointed  Consul  for  Turkey 
by  His  Imperial  Majesty  the  Sultan.  Presi- 
dent of  the  Sind  Branch  of  the  Central  National 
Muhammadan  Association,  1884;  also  Presi- 
dent of  the  Karachi  Madrasa  Board,  managing 
the  Karachi  Muhammadan  College,  which  has 
an  endowment  fund  of  about  six  lakhs  of 
rupees. 

Residence. — Karachi,  Bombay. 


HASAN  ALI  walad  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 

HASAN  ALI  walad  MUHAMMAD  AISAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Karachi,  Sind. 


HASAN  ALI  KHAN,  C.I.E.,  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     The  Nawab  was  created  a  Companion  of  the 
Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  5th  February  1881. 
Residence. — Baluchistan. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  173 


HASAN  ALI  KHAN,  MIR,  His  Highness. 

The  title  is  personal.     His  Highness  is  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

HATI  SINGH  (of  Chandgarh),  Rao. 

Born  5th  September  1844.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  is  said  to  have 
been  originally  conferred  by  Gori  Shah  Padishah.  The  family  is  descended 
from  Prithi  Singh,  who  was  eleventh  in  descent  from  the  famous  Bhoj  Raj. 

Residence. — Nimdr,  Central  Provinces. 


174  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


HATWA,  MAHARAJA  SIR  KRISHNA  PARTAB  SAHI 
BAHADUR,  K.C.I.B.,  Maharaja  Bahadur  of. 

Born  October  1857.  Belongs  to  a  Baghochhia  Brahman  family,  that 
claims  to  have  been  settled  as  Rajas  in  the  district  of  Saran  for  102  generations. 
The  patronymic  of  the  earlier  Rajas  was  "  Sen,"  this  in  the  sixteenth  descent 
was  changed  to  "Singh,"  in  the  eighty-third  to  "Mai,"  and  in  the  eighty-seventh 
to  "Sahi."  The  traditions  of  the  family  state  that  the  title  of  Maharaja  was  con- 
ferred on  the  eighty-sixth  in  this  line,  the  Maharaja  Kalyan  Mai,  and  that  of  Maha- 
raja Bahadur  on  the  eighty-seventh,  the  Maharaja  Isham  Karan  Sahi  Bahadur, 
both  by  the  Emperor  of  Delhi.  In  the  time  of  Akbar  it  is  said  that  the 
Maharaja  Jubraj  Sahi  Bahadur  obtained  possession  of  Pargana  Sipa  by  killing 
the  Muhammadan  Chief  Kabul  Muhammad,  probably  one  of  those  Muham- 
madan  Chiefs  who  had  rebelled  against  the  Imperial  authority  in  Southern 
Behar.  Four  generations  later  the  Maharaja  Sardar  Sahi  invaded  the  Majauli 
Raj,  and  destroyed  their  garh  or  fort,  and  imposed  as  terms  of  peace  on  the 
Chief  of  Majauli  the  condition  that  he  and  his  descendants  were  not  to  dis- 
play their  nishans  and  dunkas  (flags  and  drums)  till  these  should  be  re- 
taken from  the  Hasipur  (or  Hatwa)  Rajas.  The  eldest  son  of  the  Maharaja 
Sardar  Sahi  died  before  his  father ;  he  was  succeeded  by  the  second  son,  the 
Maharaja  Fateh  Sahi  Bahadur,  who  was  a  rebel  against  the  British  Govern- 
ment in  1767,  in  the  time  of  Warren  Hastings,  and  ultimately  fled  to  the 
Gorakhpur  jungles.  His  cousin,  Babu  Bassant  Sahi,  displayed  his  loyalty 
by  assisting  the  Government  with  his  retainers,  and  doing  all  in  his  power 
to  arrest  Fateh  Sahi.  But  in  1775  he  was  surprised  by  the  rebel  and  killed, 
and  his  widow  ascended  the  funeral  pyre,  and  was  burnt  with  her  husband's 
head  on  her  lap.  Bassant  Sahi's  son,  Babu  Mahes  Datt  Sahi,  followed  in  his 
father's  footsteps,  and  the  Government  was  about  to  proclaim  him  the  rightful 
successor  of  the  rebel  Fateh  Sahi  when  he  died,  leaving  a  son,  Babu — after- 
wards Maharaja — Chhatardhari  Sahi.  In  1790,  when  the  Decennial  Settle- 
ment was  in  contemplation,  Lord  Cornwallis,  after  inquiring  into  all  the 
facts  and  the  usages  of  the  family,  granted  to  the  latter  the  estates  of  Fateh 
Sahi;  and  in  1837  the  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur  was  conferred  upon  him. 
This  title  was  renewed  in  October  1858  in  favour  of  the  Maharaja  Rajendar 
Partab  Sahi,  and  by  the  sanad  of  3ist  August  1874  in  favour  of  the  present 
Maharaja  Bahadur.  At  the  time  of  the  Santal  insurrection,  and  again  during 
the  Mutiny  of  1857,  the  Maharaja  Chhatardhari  Sahi  Bahadur  rendered  most 
valuable  services  to  the  Government,  and  was  rewarded  at  the  close  of  the 
Mutiny  with  the  grant  of  a  portion  of  the  confiscated  estates  of  the  rebel 
Kunwar  Singh.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  great-grandson,  the  late  Maharaja 
Rajendra  Partab  Sahi  Bahadur,  who  died  in  1871,  leaving  a  minor  son,  the 
present  Maharaja,  The  latter  attained  his  majority  and  was  installed  on  the 
gadi  on  3ist  August  1874.  He  received  a  medal  of  distinction  at  the 
Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation 
of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  and  in  1889  he  was 
created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire.  The  family  cognisance  consists  of  a  shield  between  two  swords, 
with  tigers  as  supporters,  and  underneath  is  the  motto — f{  tnihT 

Residence. — Hatwa,  Saran,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  175 


HAZURA  SINGH,  SUBAHDAR,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  25th  March  1880. 
Residence. — Rewa,  Central  India. 

HIMMAT  SINGH  (of  Katra  Balkheda),  Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 

Residence. — Katra  Balkheda,  Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

HINDOL,  RAJA  JANARDAN  MARDRAJ  JAGDEB,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Bom  1855  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i8th  July  1877.  The  title  of  Raja 
has  always  been  enjoyed  by  the  head  of  this  family  since  Mahratta  times,  and 
was  formally  recognised  by  Government  in  1874.  The  State  was  founded 
by  two  brothers  named  Lakshman  Mahratta  and  Bharat  Mahratta,  scions  of 
the  family  of  the  Khemdi  Raja  in  Ganjam.  The  present  Raja,  who  suc- 
ceeded his  brother,  Raja  Fakir  Singh  Mardraj  Jagdeb,  is  stated  to  be  twenty- 
fifth  in  succession  from  them.  His  father  was  Raja  Ishwar  Singh  Mardraj 
Jagdeb.  The  family  cognisance  is  a  dagger.  The  area  of  the  State  is  312 
miles;  its  population  33,802,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  maintains  a  mili- 
tary force  of  148  infantry  and  2  guns.  The  State  is  one  of  the  Orissa 
Tributary  Mahals. 

Residence. — Hindol,  Orissa,  Bengal. 

HINDUPAT  (of  Bharrai),  Rao  Saheb. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  originally  conferred  on  Rati 
Rao,  the  founder  of  the  family,  by  the  old  Mahratta  Government  of  Deori. 
Has  two  sons — Diwan  Malkhan  Singh  and  Diwan  Gajraj  Singh. 

Residence. — Sdgar,  Central  Provinces. 

HINDUPAT  (of  Ghat  Piparia),    Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  present  Thakur  is  the  son  of  the  late 
Thakur  Orjuri  Singh.  The  family  is  descended  from  ancestors  who  obtained 
the  village  of  Ghat  Piparia,  with  the  title  of  Thakur,  from  the  old  Mahratta 
Government  of  Sagar.  , 

Residence. — Ghat  Piparia,  Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

HINDUR  (NALAGARH),  RAJA  ISRI  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1832  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i6th  December  1876.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  whose  founder  was  named  Aji  Singh,  and  the  present 
Raja  is  twenty-fifth  in  succession  from  him.  The  State  was  overrun  by  the 
Gurkhas,  but  they  were  expelled  by  the  British  forces  in  1815-16,  and  in 
that  year  the  Raja  received  a  sanad  confirming  him  in  the  possession  of  all 


176  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

his  territory  except  the  fort  of  Malaun,  for  which  the  Thdkuri  of  Barauli  was 
substituted.  Subsequently,  in  1846,  the  fort  was  restored  to  him.  The  area 
of  the  State  is  249  square  miles;  its  population  is  53,373,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  7201  Muhammadans.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of 
375  infantry  and  4  guns. 

Residence. — Hindur,  Punjab. 

HIBA,  RAW  AT  (of  Dewair),   Thdkur  Rdwat. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877  as  a  personal  distinction,  on 
the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress 
of  India. 

Residence.  — Merwara. 

HIRA  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The-  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty,  for 
eminent  official  services  in  the  Survey. 

Residence. — Survey  of  India. 

HIRA  SINGH,   MAN  (of  Manawala),  Sardar. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Man  Jat  family,  descended  from 
Sardar  Sarja  Singh,  whose  grandson,  Colonel  Budh  Singh,  Man,  served 
throughout  the  Sutlej  Campaign,  and  after  its  close  was  sent  with  the  Sher 
Singh  brigade  to  assist  the  Maharaja  Gulab  Singh  to  subdue  the  rebellion  in 
Kashmir.  The  Colonel  rendered  excellent  service  in  this  campaign;  and 
also  throughout  the  Multan  rebellion  (or  second  Sikh  war),  in  which  he  was 
severely  wounded  when  fighting  gallantly  under  Major  Nicholson  against  the 
rebels  in  the  Margalla  Pass.  On  the  annexation  he  was  rewarded  with 
extensive  lands.  On  his  death  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present 
Sardar. 

Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

HIRA  SINGH,  SARDAR  (of  Jamdan),  Rdjd. 

Born  5th  May  1839.  The  title  of  Raja  was  conferred  on  yth  December 
1888  as  a  personal  distinction,  to  mark  the  appreciation  of  the  Government 
of  the  Sardar's  exertions  for  the  improvement  of  agriculture  in  Oudh.  Is  the 
son  of  Sardar  Bahadur  Jai  Singh,  of  the  Gondon  Khatri  Sikh  family  of 
Jamdan,  who  was  an  officer  in  the  army  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of 
Lahore ;  was  subsequently  appointed  by  Lord  Lawrence  to  the  ist  Sikhs. 
For  his  gallant  conduct  and  loyalty  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857  he  was  made 
a  Sardar  Bahadur;  and  in  1858  was  rewarded  with  a  large  grant  of  lands. 
He  died  in  November  1865,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present 
Raja,  who  was  himself  a  distinguished  officer  in  Fane's  Horse,  and  served 
through  the  Mutiny  campaigns  and  in  the  China  war.  Since  his  retirement 
from  the  army  he  has  lived  for  many  years  on  his  estates  in  Oudh,  devoting 
himself  to  their  improvement. 

Residence. — Bahraich,  Oudh. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  177 


HIRAPUR,  RAO  CHHATAR  SINGH,  Rao  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1821  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  May  1841.     Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family.     The  population  of  the  State  is  963,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Hirapur,  Bhopdl,  Central  India. 


HITTU  RAM,  C.I.B.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1842.  Has  long  been  a  distinguished  political  officer  on  the 
frontier  of  Baluchistan  and  Afghanistan,  having  entered  the  service  in  1859, 
when  he  received  a  reward  for  preparing  a  "  History  of  Dera  Ghazi  Khan 
District  and  Frontier."  Appointed  to  special  duty  for  Kalat  in  1875  ; 
accompanied  Sir  Robert  Sandeman  on  two  missions  to  Kalat,  and  received 
a  khilat  in  1877  for  his  services  thereon,  also  the  title  of  Rai.  Appointed 
Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  of  the  Punjab  in  1879;  and  in  same  year 
received  a  khilat  at  the  Kalat  Darbar,  and  was  placed  in  charge  of  Sibi 
district.  Received  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction,  2oth 
April  1 88 1,  having  served  in  the  Political  Department  throughout  the  Afghan 
war  of  1 880-8 1,  with  medal.  In  the  same  year  he  received  a  jdgir,  and  in 
1882  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire.  Was  in  charge  of  arrangements  for  supplies,  etc.,  for  the  Afghan 
Boundary  Commission,  1884,  across  the  Baluch  Desert;  and  received  thanks 
of  Government  for  the  same.  Was  on  special  duty  in  the  Bolan  Pass,  in  the 
military  preparations  for  the  expected  outbreak  of  hostilities  between  England 
and  Russia,  March  1884  to  November  1885.  Deputed  to  hold  charge  of 
Las  Bela  State  on  the  death  of  the  Jam  in  1889,  pending  installation  of 
successor;  and  was  on  special  duty  with  Sir  R.  Sandeman  in  1889-91,  and 
specially  commended. 

Residence. — Sibi,  Baluchistan. 


HLAING,  MAUNG-  (Shwedabo  of  Baw),  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda 

ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Shan  State  of  Baw,  Burma.  - 


HLB,   MAUNG,  Ahmiidan  gaung  Tazeik-ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889.  It  means 
"Recipient  of  the  Medal  of  Honour  for  Good  Service,"  and  is  indicated  by 
the  letters  A.T.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Maulmein,  Burma. 


X 
173  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


HMB,  MAUNG,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Sahue  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Prome,  Burma. 

HOLKAR,  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  (of  Indore}.     See  Indore. 

HOPON,  KUN  WARA,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  frontier  of 
Burma,  is  about  400  square  miles. 
Residence. — Hopon,  Burma. 

HORMASJI  ADARJI  PATBL,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 

HOSHANGJI  JAMASPJI,  DASTUR,  Khan  Bahadur,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

These  titles  are  personal;  the  first  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1878, 
and  the  second  on  ist  January  1890.  The  title  of  Shams-ul-Ulama  entitles 
the  Khan  Bahadur — who  is  also  a  "  Dastur  "  or  High  Priest  of  the  Parsis  of 
the  Deccan — to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Nawabs.  The 
Dastur  Jamaspassa  family  are  descended  from  Assaji.  The  last  Dastur 
of  that  family,  the  Dastur  Nasarwanji  Jamaspji,  Khan  Bahadur,  rendered 
valuable  services  to  Government  during  the  time  of  the  Mutiny;  and 
received  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  as  a  reward  for  them  in  1868.  The 
title  of  Shams-ul-Ulama  was  conferred  on  Dastur  Hoshangji  Jamaspji  in 
recognition  of  .his  eminence  in  oriental  learning. 

Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

HUSAIN  walad  SHAIKH  MADAR,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Belgaum,  Bombay. 

HUSAIN  BAKHSH  walad  GHULAM  HAIDAR  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 

HUSSAN.     See  Hasan. 
HUTWA,  Maharaja  Bahadur  of.     See  Hatwa. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


179 


HYDERABAD  (or,  The  Deccan),  His  Highness  the  Nizam  of,  G. C.S.I. 
A  Ruling  Chief,  and  the  Premier  Prince  of  the  Indian  Empire. 

Born  1 8th  August  1866;  succeeded  to  the  masnad  as  a  minor,  on  the 
death  of  his  father,  His  late  Highness  the  Nizam  Afzul-ud-daula,  26th 
^February  1869. 

The  Nizam's  full  titles  are— His 
Highness  Asaf  Jah,  Muzaffar-ul- 
Mamalik,  Rustam-i-Dauran,  Arastu-i- 
Zaman,  Nizam-ul-Mulk,  Nizam -ud- 
daula,  Nawab  Mir  Sir  Mahbub  AH 
Khan  Bahadur,  Fath  Jang,  Knight 
Grand  Commander  of  the  Most 
Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India. 
Belongs  to  a  family  of  the  highest 
antiquity  and  importance  among 
Muhammadan  rulers,  being  lineally 
descended  from  the  first  Khalif, 
Abu  Bakr,  the  successor  of  the 
Prophet.  His  descendant,  after  a 
long  line  of  intervening  generations, 
was  the  Turkoman  Chief  named 

Ghazi-ud-din,  one  of  the  greatest  of  the  Generals  of  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb, 
who  was  the  hero  of  the  capture  of  Bijapur  in  1686  A.D.  ;  he  was 
largely  concerned  in  the  overthrow  both  of  that  kingdom  and  of  the 
Golkonda  dynasty,  and  in  the  establishment  of  the  Mughal  power  in 
the  Deccan,  which  then  became  a  subah  (or  province)  of  the  Mughal 
Empire  of  Delhi.  His  son  and  successor  was  Chin  Kulij  Khan,1 
better  known  as  the  great  Asaf  Jah,  the  real  founder  of  the  Hyderabad 
dynasty.  He  was  bom  in  1644;  and  in  1713  was  appointed  Subahddr  or 
Viceroy  of  the  Deccan  by  the  Emperor  Farukh  Siyar,  with  the  title  of  Nizam- 
ul-Mulk  (Administrator  of  the  Country),  which  has  ever  since  been  retained 
by  his  descendants.  He  reigned  till  1748,  attaining  the  great  age  of  104; 
and  throughout  this  lengthened  career,  with  occasional  vicissitudes  of  fortune, 

1  Ktilij  or  Qulij — sometimes  spelt  Chillich — is  the  Turki  word  for  sword ;  and  Kulij 
Khan,  as  a  title,  bears  the  same  meaning  as  the  Persian  Shamsher  Khan.  On  the  title  of 
Asaf  Jah,  subsequently  borne  by  the  Nawab  Chin  Kulij  Khan  and  his  descendants,  the 
learned  Professor  Blochmann  gives  this  note  :  "  Asaf  was  the  name  of  the  Vazir  of  Solomon, 
who  like  his  master  is  proverbial  in  the  East  for  wisdom.  During  the  reign  of  Akbar  three 
grandees  received  this  title.  Badaoni,  to  avoid  confusion,  numbers  them  Asaf  Khan  I.,  II., 
and  III.  .  .  .  Jahangir  conferred  the  title  of  Asaf  Khan  (IV.)  on  Abul  Hasan,  elder  brother 
of  the  Empress  Nur  Jahan,  and  father  of  the  Empress  Mumtaz  Mahal  (or  Taj  Bibi,  Shah- 
jahan's  wife),  whose  mother  was  a  daughter  of  Asaf  Khan  II.  During  the  reign  of  Shahjahan, 
when  titles  containing  the  word  Dauld  were  revived,  Asaf  Khan  was  changed  to  Asaf-ud- 
dauld ;  and  this  title  was  conferred  on  Asaf-ud-daula  Jumlat-ul-Mulk  Asad  Jang,  a  relation 
of  Asaf  Khan  IV.  Under  Ahmad  Shah,  lastly,  we  find  Asaf-ud-daula  Amir-ul-Mamalik, 
whose  name,  like  that  of  his  father,  Nizam-ul-Mulk  Asaf  Jah,  occurs  so  often  in  later  Indian 
history." 

As  the  ancient  titles  of  the  Mughal  Empire  are  retained  among  the  nobles  of  the  Deccan, 
and  are  still  conferred  by  His  Highness  the  Nizam,  it  may  here  be  noted  that  in  ascending 
order  they  contain  the  words  Jang,  Dauld,  Mulk,  and  Umara  or  Jah.  Titles  containing 
the  words  Jah  or  Umara  may  be  compared  with  English  Dukes  or  Marquesses  ;  those  con- 
taining Mttlk  with  English  Earls ;  those  containing  Dauld  with  Viscounts ;  and  those 
containingya7Z£-  with  Barons. 


i8o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

he  continually  increased  his  power  during  the  days  of  the  declining  vigour  of 
the  Mughal  Empire. 

The  dynasty,  thus  established  as  the  greatest  native  Power  in  the  Indian 
Peninsula,  has  been  almost  uniformly  closely  attached  to  the  British  Power  in 
India,  and  has  consequently  obtained  from  English  writers  the  style  of  "  Our 
faithfully  ally  the  Nizam."  At  all  the  most  critical  periods  in  the  history  of 
the  Indian  Empire — in  the  Mysore  wars,  in  the  Mahratta  wars,  during  the 
Mutiny  of  1857,  and  recently  when  Russian  invasion  seemed  probable — the 
Nizam  of  the  day  has  always  rendered  invaluable  help. 

Of  Asaf  Jah,  the  founder  of  the  dynasty,  an  English  writer  thus 
speaks : — 

"  Content,  however,  with  actual  sovereignty,  he  never  assumed  its  title  and 
insignia.  The  family,  indeed,  to  the  last  professed  subordination  to  the  Court  of 
Delhi,  and  the  Nizam's  successors  continued  to  be  formally  confirmed  by  mandates 
from  the  Mogul  Emperors.  The  immunity  enjoyed  by  Nizam-ool-Moolk,  in  a 
practical  surrender  of  the  Deccan  to  his  rule,  appears  to  have  been  merely  due 
to  his  essential  importance  as  the  only  available  check  to  the  growing  power  and 
harassing  incursions  of  the  Mahrattas — a  constant  source  of  disturbance  and 
alarm  to  his  titular  master.  The  evening  of  his  eventful  life,  whose  span  is  said 
to  have  exceeded  a  century,  was  spent  by  the  first  Nizam  with  singular  retention 
of  extraordinary  physical  and  mental  faculties,  in  his  so  strangely  gained  prin- 
cipality, when  death  closed  in  1748  a  career  remarkable  and  prominent  in  a 
stirring  and  productive  time.  Impartial  estimates  of  his  character  can  hardly  be- 
grudge his  descendants  a  pride  in  the  founder  of  their  name  and  renown,  for  his 
politic  compass  and  tenacious  hold  of  independent  power  were  unstained  by 
treachery  or  cruelty,  and  the  later  annals  of  the  family  are  similarly  clear  of  the 
grosser  incidents  of  conquests.  He  left  them,  too,  an  example  of  equanimity 
undaunted  in  adversity  and  superior  to  elation  by  success."  1 

After  the  death  of  the  aged  Nizam-ul-Mulk  the  throne  of  the  Deccan 
was  long  and  fiercely  contended  for,  with  varying  fortunes,  by  his  grandson 
Muzaffar  Jang,  and  his  sons  (uncles  of  Muzaffar  Jang),  known  as  Ghazi-ud-din, 
Nasir  Jang,  Salabat  Jang,  and  Nizam  Ali.  Involved  in  these  wars  were  also 
the  English  and  French  forces  in  the  Carnatic,  and  the  armies  of  the  Mahrattas 
and  of  the  Nawabs  of  Arcot.  It  was  the  Nizam  Salabat  Jang  who  finally 
adopted  the  city  of  Hyderabad,  on  the  river  Musi,  as  his  capital ;  its  ancient 
name  was  Bhagnagar,  and  it  had  been  founded  in  1585  by  Muhammad  Kutb 
Shah,  King  of  Golkonda.  In  1761  Salabat  Jang  was  dethroned  by  his 
brother  Nizam  Ali,  who  put  him  to  death  in  1763,  and  reigned  till  1803 — 
playing  a  prominent  part  during  the  whole  of  that  period  in  the  incessant 
wars  with  the  English,  the  Mahrattas,  and  the  Sultans  of  Mysore,  Haidar  and 
Tippu.  The  first  treaty  between  the  British  Power  and  the  Nizam  was  con- 
cluded in  1766,  followed  by  great  and  permanent  treaties  in  1798  and  1800. 
In  accordance  with  these  engagements,  after  the  defeats  of  the  Mahrattas  at 
Laswari  and  Assaye,  the  Nizam  received  large  accessions  of  territory,  including 
the  great  and  rich  province  of  Berar ;  and  similarly  after  the  conquest  of 
Tippu  the  Nizam  shared  in  the  division  of  territory.  Nizam  Ali  died  in 
1803,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  Nizam  Sikandar  Jah,  who  was 
served  in  turn  by  three  famous  Prime  Ministers,  Mir  Alam,  Munir-ul-Mulk, 

1  Quoted  in  the  learned  and  voluminous  History  of  Hyderabad  Affairs,  compiled  for 
private  circulation  in  1883  by  the  Maulavi  Sayyid  Mehdi  Ali,  Nawab  Mohsin-ul-Mulk, 
Secretary  to  the  Government  of  His  Highness  the  Nizam. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  181 

and  the  Raja  Chandu  Lai.  In  1829  Sikandar  Jah  was  succeeded  by  his 
son,  the  Nizam  Nasir-ud-daula,  who  reigned  till  1857.  He  had  no  great 
liking  for  affairs  of  State,  which  he  left  largely  to  the  care  of  his  Prime 
Minister,  the  Nawab  Suraj-ul-Mulk,  who  died  in  1853,  when  the  Nizam 
appointed  his  nephew,  the  well-known  Sir  Salar  Jang,  to  succeed  him  in  the 
office  of  Minister.  Nasir-ud-daula  is  described  as  having  "  a  gracious  dis- 
position to  private  charity,  and  with  much  bountiful  kindness  to  his  de- 
pendants." He  died  in  May  1857,  just  before  the  outbreak  of  the  Mutiny, 
and  was  succeeded  by  His  late  Highness  the  Nizam  Afzul-ud-daula,  father  of 
the  present  Nizam. 

The  loyalty  of  the  late  Nizam  and  his  troops  during  the  crisis  of  1857 
has  been  well  commemorated  by  an  English  writer  in  the  following 
words  : — 

"When,  on  the  I7th  of  July  in  that  memorable  year,  after  a  frantic  pro- 
mulgation of  Jihad  or  Holy  War  on  the  part  of  the  indigenous  Muhammadans  of 
both  Southern  and  Northern  India,  the  Rohillas  attacked  the  Residency,  and 
were  repulsed  by  troops  under  the  command  of  the  late  Colonel  Briggs,  had  the 
Nizam,  untried  as  he  then  was,  aided  the  movement,  or  even  openly  avowed 
sympathy  with  the  mutineers,  there  can  be  no  doubt  that  any  success  at  Hydera- 
bad would  have  proved  a  signal  for  revolt  to  the  bigoted  and  fanatic  Muhammadan 
population,  not  only  there,  but  in  all  Central,  Western,  and  Southern  India, 
and  that  our  terrible  straits  elsewhere  would  have  been  multiplied  and  sorely 
aggravated.  For  we  had  at  the  time  but  one  European  corps  at  Secunderabad, 
the  military  station,  and  camped  at  Trimulgherry,  about  two  miles  from  the 
central  arsenal,  which  must  have  been  left  in  the  charge  of  native  soldiers  if 
attacked  from  the  capital.  .  .  .  But  the  Nizam  was  firm  in  his  alliance,  attracting 
to  our  side  all  that  was  respectable  in  his  Court  and  capital.  The  traditions  of 
the  family  also,  and  old  memories  of  rescue  from  the  Mahrattas,  were  with  us, 
and  not  inefficacious  in  our  hour  of  need. 

"And  now  for  the  behaviour  of  the  Hyderabad  contingent.  In  this  force, 
recollect,  are  thousands  of  the  same  caste  as  those  whose  relatives  elsewhere  were 
murdering  their  officers,  or  marching  towards  the  Mogul  standard  at  Delhi. 
From  these  came  emissaries,  not  only  to  their  brethren  of  the  contingent,  with 
letters  and  personal  entreaties  to  join,  but  to  the  Court  itself.  The  greater 
portion  of  the  contingent  was  presently  ordered  into  the  .field,  and  a  brigade  of 
all  arms  was  pushed  into  Central  India,  where  they  fought,  under  Sir  Hugh  Rose, 
with  bravery  and  endurance  unsurpassed  by  any  corps  in  the  Service.  With  only 
eighteen  hours'  warning,  i.e.  receiving  their  orders  at  seven  in  the  morning,  and 
starting  at  midnight  of  the  same  day,  these  troops  took  the  field,  and  were  absent 
from  their  homes  for  fifteen  months,  remaining  the  whole  of  that  time  under 
canvas,  leaving  their  own  fertile  plain  of  the  Deccan  behind  them,  until,  after 
fighting  their  way  inch  by  inch,  they  bathed  in  the  holy  river  at  Calpee,  after  a 
signal  victory  obtained  over  the  rebels  at  that  place.  Instancing  a  few  of  their 
exploits,  I  may  mention  that  at  Mehidpoor,  the  seat  of  former  triumph  to  the 
contingent,  when  they  formed  a  part  of  Sir  John  Malcolm's  army  in  1817,  they 
arrived,  after  a  forced  march  of  sixty  miles,  in  time  to  rescue  an  English  lady  ; 
and  finding  that  the  enemy,  consisting  of  the  Mehidpoor  contingent  and  the 
escaped  garrison  of  Dhar,  had  made  away  with  the  Mehidpoor  battery  and 
arsenal  stores,  they  immediately,  after  despatching  Mrs.  Timmins  to  the  camp  of 
the  Bombay  column,  rattled  off  in  pursuit,  the  enemy  having  got  several  hours' 
start  of  them.  They  overtook  the  rascals  late  in  the  afternoon,  about  twelve 
miles  distant  from  Mehidpoor,  charged,  and  captured  both  battery  and  stores, 
cutting  up  a  large  number  of  mutineers,  and  severing  at  a  blow,  from  the  enemy, 


182  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

most  important  means  of  offence  and  defence,  which  a  week  later  would  assuredly 
have  been  in  position  and  used  against  us  when  the  great  battle,  which  lasted 
throughout  four  days,  was  fought  at  Mundessoor.  The  troops,  especially  the 
native  portion,  lived  almost  entirely  on  parched  grain  collected  from  the  fields  in 
the  neighbourhood,  and  immediately  submitted  to  the  process  of  hand  manipula- 
tion over  the  fire.  It  is  not  my  intention  to  trace  here  the  further  exploits  of  the 
Hyderabad  contingent  troops,  beyond  noticing  the  fact  of  their  rapid  journeys  in 
advance  of  the  main  columns  they  accompanied,  returning  only  to  headquarters 
when  a  general  action  was  to  be  fought.  On  the  thousands  of  miles  marched  by 
the  cavalry  of  this  force,  accompanied  often  by  the  infantry  and  artillery,  I  need 
not  dwell.  Sir  Hugh  Rose  termed  these  troops  'the  wings  of  my  army.'  With 
the  restoration  of  peace  came  full  time  for  recognising  the  Nizam's  fidelity  and 
active  aid.  Presents  to  the  value  of  ,£10,000  were  made  to  His  Highness,  and 
the  Star  of  India  was  conferred  on  him.  The  territory  transferred  in  '53  to  our 
management  was  now  yielding  more  than  the  requisite  revenue,  and  a  new  arrange- 
ment was  accordingly  proposed,  under  which,  in  1860,  districts  of  the  value  of 
13  lacs  were  restored  to  the  Nizam,  together  with  a  transfer  of  the  principality 
of  Shorapoor,  whose  Rajah  had  been  seduced  into  the  rebellion  of  the  Southern 
Mahratta  country.  This  acquisition  affords  an  annual  surplus  of  ,£15,000.  We 
also  remitted  the  entire  debt." 

The  Nizam  Afzul-ud-daula,  G. C.S.I.,  died  in  1869,  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son,  the  present  Nizam,  who  has  followed  all  the  best  traditions  of  his 
ancestors,  and  has  demonstrated  his  attachment  to  the  Empire  in  even  more 
striking  fashion.  In  1885  he  offered  to  send  troops  to  aid  the  Government 
in  Egypt ;  and  in  the  same  year,  when  there  was  a  menace  of  Russian 
aggression  on  the  Afghan  frontier,  he  repeated  the  generous  offer.  But  it 
was  in  1887,  in  the  year  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's 
reign,  that  His  Highness  gave  the  most  signal  proof  of  his  princely  loyalty. 
In  August  of  that  year  His  Highness  wrote  the  following  most  remarkable 
and  patriotic  letter  to  the  Viceroy  of  India  : — 

"  HYDERABAD,  August  26. 

11  MY  FRIEND, — No  inhabitant  can  be  indifferent  to  the  persistent  advance 
of  another  great  military  power  towards  India  ;  to  the  necessity  that  exists  for 
putting  the  frontier  in  a  proper  state  of  defence  ;  and  to  the  burden  it  imposes 
on  those  charged  with  its  safety  and  the  care  of  the  Empire.  All  who  have  the 
welfare  of  India  at  heart  are  bound  to  consider  what  should  be  done,  and  to 
show  they  are  heartily  in  sympathy  with  those  who  are  endeavouring  to  place 
the  frontier  in  a  proper  state  of  defence,  so  as  to  ward  off  all  danger  from  our 
hearths  and  homes.  The  Princes  of  India  have  not  been  blind  to  the  movement 
of  events.  We  realise  the  financial  responsibility  the  present  state  of  affairs 
imposes  on  the  Indian  Exchequer.  It  seems  to  me  that  the  time  has  arrived  for 
showing  in  some  open  manner  that  India  is  united  on  this  question,  and  for  that 
reason  I  write  now  to  spontaneously  offer  to  the  Imperial  Government  a  con- 
tribution from  the  Hyderabad  State  of  twenty  lakhs  annually  for  three  years,  for 
the  exclusive  purpose  of  Indian  frontier  defence.  This  is  my  offer  in  time  of 
peace.  At  a  later  stage  you  can  count  upon  my  sword. — Your  sincere  friend, 

"  MIR  MAHBUB  ALI  KHAN." 

The  effect  of  this  letter  on  public  opinion  throughout  the  world  was  very 
great.  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen  Empress  was  pleased  to 
express  her  warm  appreciation  of  the  loyal  action  of  His  Highness  in  the 
following  letter,  by  His  Excellency  the  Viceroy's  hand  : — 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  183 

"SIMLA,  October*]. 

"  MY  FRIEND, — I  have  received  from  Colonel  Marshall  your  letter  of  the 
26th  of  August,  and  send  this  reply  by  his  hands.  It  is  difficult  for  me  to 
express  in  fitting  terms  my  sense  of  the  ready  loyalty  and  goodwill  which  have 
prompted  your  Highness  to  come  forward  at  this  time  with  so  generous  an  offer, 
emanating  as  its  does  from  the  head  of  one  of  the  largest  and  most  important 
States  in  India.  It  is  indeed  a  striking  proof  of  the  friendly  feelings  entertained 
towards  Her  Majesty  and  -the  British  Government  by  the  Princes  of  the  Empire  ; 
and  I  had  the  greatest  satisfaction  in  acquainting  the  Queen  Empress  with  the 
contents  of  your  Highness's  kharita.  There  is  no  doubt  that  the  advance  of  a 
great  military  power  towards  the  borders  of  India  has  imposed  on  the  Govern- 
ment the  obligation  of  taking  those  precautions  for  the  defence  of  our  frontier 
which  are  adopted  by  all  nations  on  becoming  conterminous  with  each  other,  no 
matter  how  friendly  their  existing  relations.  This  duty  undoubtedly  has  con- 
siderably added,  and  will  continue  to  add  for  some  time,  to  the  expenditure  of 
the  Government  of  India  ;  and  it  is  a  convincing  proof  both  of  your  Highness's 
statesmanlike  capacity  as  well  as  of  your  generosity  that  you  should  have  been 
the  first  among  the  Princes  of  India  to  recognise  the  principle  that  the  Native 
States  are  as  much  interested  as  the  rest  of  the  Indian  population  in  assisting 
the  Government  to  take  whatever  measures  may  be  necessary  to  preserve  the 
borders  of  the  Empire  from  any  dangers  which  may  arise  from  external  com- 
plications. Again  thanking  your  Highness  in  the  name  of  my  Government,  as 
well  as  in  the  name  of  Her  Majesty  and  the  Government  of  England,  for  the 
noble  example  which  you  have  set, — I  remain,  my  friend,  yours  sincerely, 

"  DUFFERIN." 

And  the  appreciation  of  the  people  of  England  of  the  friendly  action  of 
the  First  Prince  of  the  Indian  Empire  was  aptly  expressed  in  the  following 
leading  article  in  the  Times : — 

"  This  is  an  intimation,  which  no  one  can  misinterpret,  that  the  great  Native 
Courts,  who  are  outside  the  red  line  of  British  administration,  have  been  alive  to 
the  incessant  encroachments  of  Russia  in  the  direction  of  India,  and  now  per- 
ceive that  this  advance  constitutes  a  danger  for  them  as  well  as  for  us.  We 
believe  that  feeling  is  shared  by  every  potentate,  great  or  small,  from  Travancore 
to  Cashmere,  yet  it  has  remained  voiceless,  not  for  want  of  will,  but  rather  of 
knowledge  as  to  how  and  when  to  speak.  With  remarkable  acumen  the  Nizam 
has  not  only  seen  that  the  time  has  come,  but  he  has  chosen  the  very  best  and 
the  most  original  mode  of  giving  vent  to  the  pent-up  feeling  of  a  large  section  of 
the  Indian  population.  In  time  of  war  and  invasion,  or,  indeed,  of  any  military 
operations  beyond  the  frontier,  the  rulers  of  the  Native  States  would  be  com- 
pelled to  play  a  certain  part,  and  we  should  receive,  as  we  have  received  before, 
the  offer  of  their  military  contingents.  But  we  are  fortunately  not  in  any  immi- 
nent risk  of  war  or  invasion,  although  we  have  sanctioned  an  expenditure  of  some 
ten  millions  sterling  on  frontier  defence,  and  it  is  this  which  makes  the  Nizam's 
princely  gift  all  the  more  gratifying  and  significant.  There  is  absolutely  no  prece- 
dent in  Indian  history  for  the  Nizam  taking  this  step  in  time  of  peace,  nor,  indeed, 
for  any  Native  Court  admitting  the  least  responsibility  in  regard  to  the  financial 
embarrassments  of  the  Central  Government,  even  if  caused  by  expenditure  on 
objects  from  which  that  Court  derives  a  direct  benefit.  The  action  of  the  Nizam, 
magnificent  in  itself,  is  enhanced  by  all  the  attendant  circumstances.  It  is  quite 
unexpected,  the  step  having  been  taken  by  the  Nizam  entirely  on  his  own 
initiative.  .  .  .  WTe  can  assure  His  Highness  that  his  generous  friendship  will 
wake  a  responsive  feeling  in  the  breasts  of  the  British  people,  not  merely  for  the 
noble  proportions  of  his  contribution  to  frontier  defence,  but  for  the  loyal  feelings 


184  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

which  inspired  him  to  place  on  unmistakable  record  before  the  world  the  unanimity 
of  opinion  in  India  on  the  subjects  of  English  rule  and  Russian  aggression. 
The  Nizam's  act  cannot  fail  to  arouse  our  enthusiasm  at  the  same  time  that  it 
furnishes  a  unique  compliment  to  our  authority  and  power. 

"  The  impression  produced  by  the  Nizam's  letter  will  not  be  limited  to  India 
or  this  country,  although  its  full  effect  will  be  felt  most  in  the  Peninsula  of 
Hindostan,  where  the  ruler  of  Hyderabad  speaks  as  the  great  political  chief 
among  the  fifty  million  Mahomedans  of  the  Empire.  The  great  service  which 
he  has  rendered  our  Government  and  cause  is  that,  at  a  moment  when  even  the 
suspicion  of  compulsion  could  not  exist,  he  has  come  forward  with  the  frank 
declaration  that  in  his  opinion  every  ruler  and  native  of  India  has  a  common 
interest  in  the  security  of  the  country  against  external  attack.  In  doing  this  he 
has  not  only  committed  his  own  person  and  dynasty  to  a  policy  of  implacable 
hostility  to  a  foreign  invader,  but  he  has  set  all  the  feudatories  of  the  Indian 
Empire  a  splendid  example.  If  any  other  Indian  chief  had  taken  this  step  the 
deed  would  have  been  in  a  personal  sense  quite  as  gratifying,  but  it  would  not 
have  possessed  the  same  political  significance.  When  an  Indian  Mahomedan 
talks  of  the  secular  power  of  Islam,  his  expressed  thought  may  be  for  the  Sultan 
as  Caliph,  but  his  real  conviction  is  that  for  him  personally  the  Nizam  is  quite 
as  important  a  personage.  The  Nizam  has  spoken  not  only  *  as  the  oldest  ally 
of  the  English  in  India,'  but  as  the  foremost  Mahomedan  potentate  in  our 
quarter  of  Asia.  He  is  an  infinitely  greater  prince,  tested  by  his  revenue,  the 
number  of  his  subjects,  and  his  own  personal  enlightenment  and  that  of  his 
Government,  than  the  Ameer  of  Bokhara,  who  is  termed  the  Head  of  Islam  in 
Central  Asia.  .  .  .  The  silly  stories  which  those  adventurers  who  wish  to  make 
a  livelihood  out  of  Russian  credulity  have  been  circulating  about  English  oppres- 
sion in  India,  and  especially  at  the  expense  of  Mahomedans,  have  now  received 
the  clearest  possible  refutations  at  the  hands  of  the  most  representative  Mahome- 
dan prince  in  the  Peninsula.  The  Nizam's  letter  is  also  .important  as  putting  an 
end  to  all  possible  ambiguity  as  to  the  cordial  relations  and  good  understanding 
subsisting  between  the  Central  Government  and  the  chief  feudatories  of  India. 
A  great  deal  too  much  notice  has  been  paid  to  alleged  disaffection  at  native 
courts  and  capitals,  instigated  by  outside  intriguers  ;  and  the  armies  and  the 
social  state  of  Native  States,  kept  up  in  conformity  with  written  treaty,  may 
perhaps  have  been  scanned  with  too  closely  critical  an  eye  under  the  sudden 
perception  of  what  might  be  a  concealed  danger.  The  Nizam's  letter  annihilates 
such  petty  and  personal  criticism.  It  is  impossible  after  this  to  suspect  Hydera- 
bad of  being  less  staunch  in  the  cause  of  defending  India  than  ourselves  ;  and 
when  the  greatest  and  most  powerful  of  Indian  States  is  thus  outspoken  we  may 
feel  sure  that  the  rest  will  not  lag  far  behind.  The  Nizam  has  been  good 
enough  to  take  the  most  effectual  steps  to  shatter  the  pleasing  belief  of  Russian 
commanders  and  some  Continental  critics,  that  when  the  Czar's  armies  move 
towards  the  Indus  the  discontented  princes  and  peoples,  alienated  by  the  greed 
and  tyranny  of  England,  will  rise  to  welcome  them  as  deliverers,  so  that  the 
contest  will  be  virtually  over  before  the  first  shot  is  fired.  .  .  .  The  present 
Nizam  has  bettered  his  predecessor's  example.  He  has  anticipated  the  crisis 
which  may  be  before  that  country,  and  he  declares  in  the  most  emphatic  and 
unequivocal  manner  that  if  the  fatal  hour  comes  he  will  be  with  us,  and  that 
'  England  can  count  on  his  sword.'  This  we  never  doubted,  but  what  is  as 
surprising  as  it  is  welcome  is  that  he  has  discovered  the  very  best  way  to  convince 
the  world  that  his  words  are  sincere,  and  not  mere  lip  service.  It  would  be 
futile  to  talk  of  making  the  Nizam  some  adequate  return,  for  there  is  no  repaying 
such  generosity  and  cordiality  as  he  has  shown.  But  we  cannot  do  less  than 
admit  that  he  acquires  an  additional  claim  on  our  confidence  and  consideration 
by  conferring  an  inestimable  service  on  the  whole  of  the  Empire,  and  one  which 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  185 

no  one  but  he,  as  the  first  of  Indian  princes,  and  the  greatest  magnate  in  alliance 
with  the  Crown,  could  have  rendered  with  the  same  effect.  British  politicians 
can  learn  from  his  action  the  moral  that  British  authority  in  India  is  both 
popular  and  useful,  and  at  the  same  time  that  the  menace  from  Russia  is 
regarded  by  the  responsible  representatives  of  the  Peninsula  as  a  real  and 
growing  danger.  In  the  union  of  those  who  will  suffer  from  it  is  to  be  found 
absolute  security,  both  now  and  in  the  future,  and  the  Nizam  has  shown  that 
this  union  exists." 

In  November  1892  the  Marquess  of  Lansdowne  visited  His  Highness's 
capital  in  State,  as  Viceroy  of. India;  and  was  entertained  at  dinner 
by  the  Nizam,  who  took  the  opportunity,  when  proposing  the  health  of  his 
distinguished  guest,  to  reiterate  his  sentiments  of  loyalty  and  friendliness 
in  the  following  words  : — 

"  The  historical  friendship  that  has  existed  between  my  State  and  the  British 
Government  has  not  been  confined  to  mere  mellifluous  words,  but  has  been 
tested  by  deeds — deeds  in  which  the  best  blood  of  Hyderabad  was  shed  in 
defence  of  British  interests,  deeds  in  which  British  blood  was  spilt  in  defending 
the  throne  of  a  faithful  ally.  This  friendship  is  a  most  precious  legacy  left  to  me 
by  my  ancestors,  which  I  am  not  only  most  anxious  to  maintain  but  to  increase 
by  continuous  deeds  of  loyal  amity." 

And  the  speech  of  the  Viceroy  reciprocated  these  sentiments ;  the  following 
is  an  extract  from  it : — 

"  His  Highness  the  Niza"m  rules  over  an  area  of  100,000  square  miles  and  a 
population  of  over  eleven  millions  of  human  beings.  It  is  perhaps  instructive,  in 
order  to  give  a  correct  idea  of  the  importance  of  the  State,  to  recall  the  fact  that 
its  population  is  about  five  times  that  of  Denmark,  considerably  more  than  double 
the  population  of  the  Netherlands,  of  Norway,  Sweden,  and  of  Turkey  in  Europe, 
while  it  is  also  considerably  more  than  double  that  of  the  great  island  Continent  of 
Australia  and  of  that  vast  Dominion  of  Canada  in  which  I  had  for  some  years  the 
honour  of  representing  Her  Majesty.  His  Highness's  territories  comprise  some 
of  the  richest  in  natural  resources  of  any  in  India,  and  it  is  not  too  much  to  say 
that  given  a  Government  founded  upon  justice  and  personal  security,  there  is  no 
reason  why  the  State  should  not  be  what  His  Highness,  I  am  sure,  desires  it  to 
be,  an  example  to  the  rest.  And  I  may  add  that  there  is  no  ruler  whom,  upon 
personal  grounds,  the  Government  of  India  is  more  desirous  of  supporting  and 
encouraging  in  the  discharge  of  his  onerous  duties  than  His  Highness  the  Nizdm. 

"  I  have  had  the  advantage  of  meeting  several  of  those  who  have  had  official 
relations  with  him,  and  they  are  all  agreed  in  bearing  witness  to  the  personal 
qualities  which  have  attracted  to  him  the  sympathy  and  goodwill  of  those  with 
whom  he  has  been  brought  into  contact.  It  is  satisfactory  to  know  that  he  has 
on  more  than  one  occasion  shown  by  his  acts  that  he  is  sincerely  anxious  to  do 
his  duty  as  the  ruler  of  this  important  State.  I  may  refer  in  illustration  of  my 
meaning  to  the  liberality  with  which  the  support  of  the  State  has  been  given  to 
such  useful  measures  as  the  improvement  of  the  water-supply  of  Secunderabad, 
and  to  the  public  spirit  shown  by  His  Highness  in  connection  with  the  appoint- 
ment of  the  Chloroform  Commission,  ably  presided  over  by  Surgeon-Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Lawrie — an  enquiry  which  has  already  produced  scientific  results  of 
importance,  and  which  shows  that  His  Highness  is  prepared  to  recognise  the 
claims  of  a  philanthropy  transcending  the  limits  of  his  own  possessions." 

The  progress  of  the  State  of  Hyderabad  under  the  rule  of  this  brave  and 


186  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

patriotic  Prince  has  been  most  surprising,  and  is  evident  in  every  department 
of  public  affairs.  In  communication  and  means  of  locomotion,  in  education, 
in  sanitation,  in  the  administration  of  justice,  police,  and  prisons,  in  finance, 
in  revenue-administration  and  surveys,  and  in  every  other  department,  the 
most  thorough  reforms  have  been  attempted  with  marked  success.  The 
recent  increase  in  trade  and  manufactures — cotton-spinning,  cloth  and  silk 
weaving,  shawl-making  and  the  like — has  been  most  marked.  It  is  not  too 
much  to  say  that  the  Nizam  is  idolised  by  his  people ;  on  the  occasion  of  his 
serious  illness  in  1884,  the  prayers  in  all  the  mosques,  and  the  public 
anxiety  throughout  the  State,  reminded  fvery  one  of  the  feeling  evoked  in 
England  by  the  illness  of  the  Prince  of  Wales.  The  Nizam  has  had  the 
advantage  of  being  served  by  many  of  the  ablest  and  most  experienced  and 
successful  Statesmen  that  India  has  produced,  among  whom  the  most 
prominent  have  been  the  late  Sir  Salar  Jang,  the  late  Shams-ul-Umara,  and 
the  living  members  of  the  great  Shamsiya  family — Sir  Asman  Jah,  Sir 
Khurshid  Jah,  and  the  Vikar-ul-Umara.  And  to  these  may  be  added  the 
Nawab  Safdar  Jang,  Mushir-ud-daula,  Fakhr-ul-Mulk  Bahadur,  Minister  of 
Justice ;  the  Nawab  Shahab  Jang,  Mukhtar-ud-daula  Bahadur,  Minister  of 
Police ;  the  Nawab  Nizam  Yar  Jang,  Hasim-ul-Mulk,  Khan-i-Khanan,  Minister 
of  the  Miscellaneous  Department ;  and  the  Nawab  Asaf  Yar-ud-daula,  Asaf 
Yar-ul-Mulk  Bahadur,  Member  of  Council.  And  among  the  Ministers  who 
have  successfully  administered  the  important  Departments  of  State  under  the 
Council  may  be  mentioned  the  Nawab  Mehdi  AH  (Mohsin-ul-Mulk),  the 
Nawab  Mushtak  Husain  (Vikar-ul-Mulk),  the  Nawab  Mehdi  Hasan  (Fateh 
Nawaz  Jang),  the  Nawab  Sayyid  Husain  AH  Bilgrami  (Imad-ul-Mulk),  the 
Nawab  Chiragh  AH  (Azam  Yar  Jang),  and  the  Sardar  Diler  Jang  (Diler-ud- 
daula).  By  the  aid  of  these  Ministers  His  Highness  has  developed  his 
State  by  a  great  railway — which  he  opened  in  person  on  the  3rd  of  April 
1886;  he  has  established  an  extensive  system  of  public  instruction,  based 
on  the  most  perfect  models,  both  for  elementary  and  for  secondary  education  ; 
he  has  purified  the  administration  of  justice,  and  put  it  on  a  par  with  that  in 
British  India ;  he  has  repaired  the  neglect  of  centuries  in  the  maintenance 
and  construction  of  tanks  and  wells,  and  in  the  sanitation  of  the  great  cities 
of  the  State,  and  especially  in  the  capital.  He  has  introduced  and  largely 
carried  out  a  scientific  system  of  Revenue  Survey,  and  safeguarded  the  rights 
of  the  poorer  cultivators.  The  great  central  jail  of  Hyderabad,  although  it 
contains  some  of  the  most  desperate  criminals  in  India,  is  admirably  arranged 
and  administered,  and  is  becoming  a  valuable  centre  for  jail-manufactures. 
His  Highness  has  cared  for  the  medical  wants  of  his  female  subjects  by 
employing  lady-doctors,  establishing  schools  for  the  training  of  nurses,  and  by 
many  similar  benefactions.  Some  of  the  sons  of  the  Hyderabad  nobles  are 
sent  to  England,  at  the  cost  of  the  State,  to  be  educated.  The  Nizam  has 
also  established  a  system  of  famine-relief,  for  use  in  time  of  famine,  based 
on  the  Report  of  Sir  James  Caird's  Famine  Commission,  that  may  be 
compared  with  that  of  British  India.  In  every  way  the  progress  attained, 
especially  of  late,  has  been  most  remarkable  and  gratifying. 

His  Highness's  personal  staff  is  at  present  constituted  as  follows  :  Private 
Secretary,  the  Nawab  Imad-iri-Mulk  Bahadur ;  Military  Secretary  and  Aides- 
de-Camp,  the  Nawab  Mahbub  Yar  Jang  Bahadur,  Major  the  Nawab  Afsar 
Jang  Bahadur,  and  the  Nawab  Dawar-ul-Mulk  Bahadur ;  Surgeon-in-attendance, 
the  Nawab  Sultan-ul-Hukama. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  187 

The  family  banner  of  the  Nizam  is  coloured  yellow,  and  it  bears  in  its 
centre  a  disc,  which  represents  the  "  Lucky  Chapati "  of  the  first  Nizam. 
This  family  cognisance  took  its  origin  in  the  following  incident.  When  the 
first  Nizam  was  departing  to  the  wars  in  the  Deccan,  a  holy  man  came 
forward  to  give  his  benediction  to  the  hero  of  the  faith,  and  presented  him 
with  a  chapdti  as  an  emblem  of  good  fortune ;  this  chapdti  the  warrior  carried 
with  him  as  an  amulet  through  all  his  successful  campaigns,  and  his 
descendants  have  ever  since  borne  the  device  called  the  kulcha  on  their 
banner. 

The  Nizam  rules  his  State  in  a  constitutional  manner,  through  the  medium 
of  a  Prime  Minister — His  Excellency  Sir  Asman  Jah,  K.C.I.E. — with  a 
Council  of  State,  whose  chief  member  is  the  Vikar-ul-Umara.  His  Highness 
has  fixed  days  in  the  week  when  he  transacts  public  business  with  the 
Council ;  and  thrice  a  week  the  Prime  Minister  attends  at  the  Palace,  with 
all  reports,  financial  statements,  and  other  documents,  thereby  keeping  the 
Nizam  fully  informed  of  the  state  of  public  affairs.  His  Highness  is  said  to 
take  a  personal  interest  in  all  that  goes  on  ;  and  indeed,  for  some  time  before 
the  appointment  of  the  present  Prime  Minister,  he  acted  as  his  own  Minister, 
with  the  aid  of  an  English  officer  lent  him  by  the  Viceroy.  He  is  a  keen 
sportsman,  and  a  proficient  in  all  manly  exercises,  especially  in  that  of  tent- 
pegging,  which  is  his  great  amusement,  and  in  which  he  is  very  expert. 

The  area  of  the  Nizam's  dominions — including  the  Berars  or  Hyderabad 
Assigned  Districts,  which  are  temporarily  administered  by  the  British 
Government  in  trust  for  him — is  about  98,000  square  miles ;  its  population 
is  nearly  13,000,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  with  over  a  million  Muhammadans. 
It  is  by  far  the  largest,  richest,  and  most  populous  of  the  feudatory  States  of 
India ;  it  is  three  times  as  large  as  Bavaria,  and  more  than  twice  as  populous. 
The  Nizam  maintains  a  military  force  of  6228  cavalry,  24,068  infantry,  and 
35  guns;  exclusive  of  the  Paigah  or  Household  Troops.  His  Highness  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  2 1  guns. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Deccan. 


i88  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

IBRAHIM  KHAN.     See  Muhammad  Ibrahim  Khan. 
IBRAHIM  SAYYID.     See  Muhammad  Ibrahim,  Maulavi,  Sayyid. 

ICHHRA  SINGH,  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Gujrdnwdla,  Punjab. 

IDAR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  SRI  SIR  KESRISINGHJI 
JAWANSINGHJI,  K.C.S.L,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1864;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  26th  December  1868.  Belongs  to 
the  great  Rahtor  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  said  to  spring  from  the  second  son 
of  the  legendary  hero  Rama,  and  therefore  of  the  Solar  race ;  of  whom  the 
principal  Chief  is  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Jodhpur,  and  to  which  also 
belong  the  Chiefs  of  Bikanir  and  Kishangarh  in  Rajputana,  and  other 
important  Princes.  In  1729,  when  the  famous  Abhai  Singh,  Rahtor  Raja 
of  Jodhpur,  was  Subahdar  of  Gujarat  under  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah, 
and  his  brother  Bakht  Singh  Rahtor  was  the  conqueror  of  Nagar,  two  other 
brothers,  named  Anand  Singh  Rahtor  and  Rai  Singh  Rahtor,  established 
themselves  at  Idar  by  force  of  arms.  The  Peshwa  and  the  Gaekwar  soon 
despoiled  the  young  State ;  and  the  Raja  Sheo  Singh  Rahtor,  son  of  Anand 
Singh,  who  died  in  1791,  was  compelled  to  lose  part  of  his  territories,  and  to 
pay  tribute  to  the  Gaekwar.  This  tribute  is  still  paid  by  the  Chief  of  Idar, 
who  in  return  receives  tribute  from  some  other  minor  States.  Sheo  Singh 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  Bhawan  Singh,  who  died  shortly  afterwards,  leaving 
the  gadi  to  a  minor  son,  the  Raja  Gambhirsinghji.  The  latter  was  succeeded 
by  the  Maharaja  Jawansinghji,  K.C.S.L,  who  was  a  Member  of  the  Legislative 
Council  of  Bombay,  and  died  in  1888,  leaving  his  son,  the  present  Maharaja, 
as  a  minor.  His  Highness  was  educated  at  the  Rajkumar  College  at  Indore. 
His  State  has  an  area  of  2500  square  miles;  and  a  population  of  258,429, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  8700  Muhammadans  and  6266  Jains.  The 
Maharaja  has  obtained  a  sanad  of  adoption;  and  was  created  a  Knight 
Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  on  i5th  Feb- 
ruary 1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  54  cavalry, 
100  infantry,  and  21  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 

Residence. — Idar,  Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

IJPURA,  THAKUR  GOBARSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born   1850.     Belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.     His  State  has  a 
population  of  about  392,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Ijpura,  Mahi  K£ntha. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  189 


ILAHI  BAKHSH,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Ajmir. 

ILOL,  THAKUR  WAKHATSINGHJI  DIPSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1864;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i6th  April  1866.  Belongs  to  a  Koli 
(Hindu)  family;  was  educated  at  the  Rajkumar  College,  Rajkot.  The 
State  of  Ilol  is  tributary  to  the  Gaekwar,  and  also  to  Idar.  Its  area  is  44 
square  miles;  its  population  is  5603,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Ilol,  Mdhi  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 

ILSIFAT  HUSAIN,  MIR,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — B  aroda. 

IMAM  BAKHSH  walad  SHER  MUHAMMAD  KHAN 
(of  Mirpur),  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

IMAM  BAKHSH  (of  Raikot),  Rai. 

Belongs  to  a  Rajput  Muhammadan  family,  that  claims  descent  from  the 
same  stock  as  that  of  the  ruling  house  of  Jaisalmir.  Its  founder,  Tulsi  Ram, 
second  son  of  Raja  Dulchi  Ram  of  Jaisalmir,  is  said  to  have  become  a  con- 
vert to  Islam  in  the  year  1833.  His  descendants  occupied  Raikot  till  the 
death  of  Rani  Bhagbari  in  1852,  when  the  territory  lapsed  to  the  British 
Government.  Rai  Imam  Bakhsh  is  a  distant  relative  of  the  late  Rani,  and  has 
succeeded  to  her  private  estate.  He  has  three  sons — Amir  Khan,  Fateh 
Khan,  and  Faizulla  Khan. 

Residence. — Raikot,  Ludhia'na,  Punjab. 

IMAM  BAKHSH  KHAN,  BOZDAR,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1834.  The  title  was  conferred  on  loth  April  1884  as  a  personal 
distinction,  in  recognition  of  his  eminent  services  in  the  Survey  Department 
as  an  explorer  of  unknown  tracts  on  the  Frontier.  He  has  done  especially 
valuable  work  as  an  explorer  in  the  Gilgit  country,  also  in  Zhob  and  the 
Ghumal  country,  and  in  the  Shirani  Hills.  He  has  taken  part  also  in  ex- 
ploring expeditions  to  the  Vaziri  country,  to  Buner,  to  Agror,  Kandahar,  and 
Kabul.  He  is  a  Member  of  the  Municipal  Committee  of  Dera  Ghazi  Khan  ; 
and  has  received  a  khilat  and  a  chair  in  Darbar  from  the  Government. 

Residence. — Dera  Ghdzi  Kha"n,  Punjab. 


190  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


IMAM  BAKHSH  KHAN  walad  MUHAMMAD  HASAN 
KHAN,  His  Highness. 

The  title  is  personal,  His  Highness  being  a  representative  of  the  ruling 
Chiefs  or  Mirs  of  Sind  at  th£  time  of  the  annexation. 

Residence. — Shika"  rpur,  S ind. 


IMAM  BAKHSH  KHAN,  MAZARI,  SIR,  K.C.I.B.,  Mir,  Nawdb. 

The  first  title  (of  Mir)  is  hereditary,  the  second  (of  Nawab)  is  personal, 
and  was  conferred  on  23rd  February  1877,  in  recognition  of  his  loyal  and 
zealous  services  in  Sir  R.  Sandeman's  mission  to  Kalat.  Belongs  to  a  Mazari 
Baluch  family  that  claims  descent  from  Amir  Hamza,  the  uncle  of  the 
Prophet,  whose  son,  Kul  Charag,  emigrated  from  Persia  to  Kalat,  and  settled 
in  Kach  and  Makran.  A  descendant,  Batil  Khan,  received  the  title  of 
"  Mazar,"  meaning  a  lion  in  the  Baluch  language,  on  account  of  his  gallantry 
in  the  battles  with  the  Lashiris,  and  hence  the  name  of  this  Baluchi  clan. 
Bahrain  Khan,  the  father  of  Sir  Imam  Bakhsh,  received  a  sanad  from  the 
Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore.  During  the  Mutiny  of  1857  Sir  Imam 
Bakhsh  gave  conspicuous  aid  to  the  Government;  and  was  created  a 
Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire, 
24th  May  1888.  He  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  of  the  first  class,  and  one 
of  the  most  influential  and  loyal  Chiefs  on  the  Baluch  frontier.  His  eldest 
son,  named  Bahrain  Khan,  was  born  in  1857,  and  has  married  the  daughter 
and  only  child  of  his  cousin,  Sher  Muhammad,  which  marriage  ensures  the 
Tamanddrshipi  or  headship  of  the  clan,  to  Sir  Imam  Bakhsh's  descendants. 

Residence. — Dera  Ghdzi  Kha"n,  Punjab. 


IMAM  SHARIF,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Survey  of  India. 

IMDAD  ALI  KHAN  walad  HASAN  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 

Residence. — Sind. 

IMDAD  IMAM,  MAUL  AVI,  SAYYID,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889  as  a  personal  distinction,  in 
recognition  of  his  eminence  as  an  oriental  scholar.  It  entitles  him  to  take 
rank  in  Darbar  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Patna,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  191 


INAYAT  ALI  KHAN  walad  MIR  GHULAM  SHAH,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


INAYAT  ALI  KHAN,  MIRZA,  AK  Kadr  Bahadur. 

Is  a  grandson  of  the  late  Muhammad  AH  Shah,  King  of  Oudh,  being  the 
son  of  the  Nawab  Sir  Mohsin-ud-daula,  K.C.S.I.,  who  married  the  King's 
daughter.  The  title,  which  is  a  personal  distinction,  was  first  conferred  by 
King  Muhammad  Ali  Shah  in  1839,  and  was  recognised  by  Government  in 
1877.  Is  a  trustee  of  the  Husainabad  Endowment. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 


INAYAT  HUSAIN  KHAN,  MUNSHI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  September  1834.  Belongs  to  a  Pathan  family,  and  has  been  in 
the  service  of  the  Government  since  1850.  During  the  Mutiny  he  rendered 
valuable  services  at  the  risk  of  his  own  life  and  property,  and  for  these  he 
has  been  rewarded  with  a  grant,  and  on  6th  June  1885  obtained  the  title  of 
Khan  Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction. 

Residence. — Allahabad,  North-Western  Provinces. 


INAYAT  HUSAIN  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  25th  November  1870. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Deccan. 


INAYAT-ULLA  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  tne 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Gwalior,  Central  India. 


INDAR  DEO  (of  Akhrota),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  family  is  of  ancient  Rajput  origin.  Its 
founder  was  Raja  Ranjit  Deo,  Raja  of  Jammu,  the  son  of  Raja  Darab  Deo, 
who  was  the  ancestor  of  the  Maharajas  of  Jammu  and  Kashmir.  Raja 
Indar  Dec's  grandfather  was  the  ruling  Chief  at  Jammu,  who  was  ejected  by 
the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore  when  he  conquered  that  territory.  He 
is  the  son  of  the  late  Raja  Raghbir  Deo. 

Residence. — Akhrota,  Pathankot,  Gurdaspur,  Punjab. 


192 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


INDAR  KUNWAR  (of  Balrdmpur),  Mahdrdni. 

The  Maharani,  being  the  widow  of  the  late  Maharaja  Sir  Digbijai 
Singh,  K.C.S.I.,  of  Balrampur,  is  the  largest  landowner  in  Oudh,  and  the 

guardian  of  the  heir  to  the  Chiefship  of 
Balrampur,  adopted  by  her.  The  hereditary 
title  of  Raja  dates  from  the  i6th  century. 
The  family  is  a  younger  branch  of  the  Janwar 
family  of  Ikauna,  in  the  Bahraich  district  (see 
Narpat  Singh,  Raja  of  Gangwal).  Madho 
Singh,  the  younger  brother  of  Raja  Ganesh 
Singh  of  that  family,  made  some  conquests 
between  the  Rapti  and  Kuana  rivers  \  and 
his  son,  Balram  Singh,  founded  the  town  of 
Balrampur.  Some  of  his  successors,  the 
Rajas  of  Balrampur,  successfully  resisted  the 
exactions  of  the  Nawabs  Vazirs  of  Oudh. 
Raja  Newal  Singh,  who  ascended  the  gadi 
in  1777,  is  one  of  the  most  famous  warriors 
of  the  line.  In  1836  the  late  Sir  Digbijai 
Singh,  K. C.S.I.,  then  a  boy  of  eighteen, 

became  Raja.  Throughout  the  Mutiny  of  1857  he  took  the  most  active  and 
conspicuous  part  on  the  side  of  the  Government  from  first  to  last,  and  in 
the  final  campaign  aided  in  driving  the  rebel  leaders  across  the  frontier  into 
the  Nepal  TardL  He  was  one  of  the  five  loyal  Talukdars  specially  mentioned 
in  Lord  Canning's  Proclamation  of  1858  ;  and  in  1866  was  created  a  Knight 
Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  He  was  for 
some  time  a  Member  of  the  Viceroy's  Legislative  Council,  and  enjoyed  a 
personal  salute  of  9  guns,  with  many  other  honours  and  dignities.  He 
died  on  the  27th  May  1882.  The  Maharani  adopted,  as  son  and  heir, 
Udit  Narayan  Singh,  a  child  nearly  related  to  the  late  Maharaja ;  and  in 
1883  this  adoption  was  ratified  by  the  Government. 

Arms. — Argent,  on  a  fesse  azure  between  in  chief  a  sword  in  bend 
surmounted  by  a  matchlock  in  bend  sinister,  and  in  base  on  a  mount  a  tiger 
couchant,  all  proper,  an  Eastern  crown  between  two  stars  of  six  points  of  the 
first.  Crest. — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  trunk  of  a  tree  eradicated 
fessewise  and  sprouting  to  the  dexter,  a  falcon  surmounted  by  a  rainbow,  all 
proper.  Motto. — Fide  et  Justitid. 

Residence. — Balrdmpur,  Gonda,  Oudh. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  193 


INDAR  NARAYAN,  Rat. 

Born  1850.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred  on  5th  June 
1858.  Belongs  to  a  Brahman  family  of  Kashmir.  The  late  Pandit  Rai 
Kishan  Narayan  was  Settlement  Deputy  Collector  of  Sagar  in  the  Central 
Provinces  at  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  greatly  distinguished  him- 
self by  his  courage  and  fidelity,  which  were  of  the  greatest  value  to  the  local 
authorities  throughout  the  time  of  the  disturbances.  As  a  reward  he  received 
the  hereditary  title  of  Rai,  with  a  grant  of  lands.  On  his  death  his  son,  the 
present  Rai,  who  is  a  Subordinate  Judge  in  the  North- Western  Provinces,  in- 
herited the  title  and  estates.  He  was  educated  at  Agra,  and  has  two  sons — 
Brij  Narayan  and  Iqbal  Narayan. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


INDAR  NARAYAN  SINGH,  Mahdrdj -Kumar. 

The  title  is  personal.  The  Maharaj-Kumar  is  the  son  of  the  late  Maha- 
raja Gopal  Chandra  Singh,  who  obtained  the  title  in  1867,  "on  account  of 
his  many  acts  of  public  liberality."  The  Maharaja  was  the  husband  of  the 
Rani  Janaki  Kumari,  eleventh  in  descent  from  Raja  Banha  Singh,  and  owner 
of  Pargana  Sultanabad  in  the  Santal  Parganas. 

Residence. — Maheshpur,  Santa"!  Pargands,  Bengal. 


194  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


INDORB,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJ-ADHIRAJ  SHIVAJI 
RAO  HOLKAR,  BAHADUR,   G.C.S.I.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1860;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  i2th  July  1886.  His  Highness's 
full  titles  are — His  Highness  Maharaj-Adhiraj  Raj  Rajeshwar  Sawai  Sir 
Shivaji  Rao  Holkar  Bahadur,  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  Holkar  is  the  dynastic  name  of  the  Princes  of 
this  great  Mahratta  family,  who  have  occupied  a  very  conspicuous  place  in 
the  history  of  India  since  the  first  half  of  the  i8th  century.  It  is  derived 
from  Hoi,  the  name  of  the  village  on  the  Nira  river  in  the  Deccan,  where, 
in  1693,  was  born  Malhar  Rao,  the  founder  of  the  dynasty.  It  is  an  in- 
teresting fact  in  connection  with  the  history  of  this  Principality,  that  its 
administration  has  twice,  at  important  periods,  been  in  the  hands  of  ladies  of 
the  family — once,  most  successfully,  in  those  of  the  famous  Ahalya  Bai 
(1765-95),  and  once  (less  happily)  in  those  of  Tulsi  Bai  (1811-17).  Malhar 
Rao  adopted  a  military  life  in  his  early  youth,  and  in  the  year  1724  entered 
the  service  of  the  Peshwa,  from  which  time  his  rise  was  very  rapid.  Eight 
years  later  he  had  become  the  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Peshwa's  armies, 
had  conquered  the  Imperial  Subahdar  of  Malwa,  and  had  received,  from  the 
gratitude  of  the  Peshwa,  the  territory  of  Indore,  with  most  of  the  conquered 
territory.  He  continued  to  strengthen  his  position,  and  at  the  great  battle  of 
Panipat,  in  conjunction  with  Sindhia  (see  Gwalior,  Maharaja  of),  he  com- 
manded one  division  of  the  Mahratta  hosts.  After  that  disaster  he  retired  to 
Indore,  and  devoted  himself  to  the  development  of  this  great  Principality, 
which  he  left  in  1765  to  his  grandson,  a  minor  named  Mali  Rao  Holkar,  in 
a  state  of  prosperity.  The  latter  died  in  a  few  months ;  and  the  administra- 
tion was  then  assumed  by  his  mother,  Ahalya  Bai,  the  daughter-in-law  of  the 
first  Holkar.  Aided  by  her  Commander-in-Chief,  Tukaji  Rao  Holkar,  this 
clever  and  courageous  lady  ruled  for  thirty  years,  and  left  Indore,  at  her 
death  in  1795,  in  a  well-ordered  and  prosperous  condition.  Thereon  much 
disorder  ensued.  At  last  Jeswant  Rao  Holkar,  an  illegitimate  son  of  Tukaji, 
amid  many  vicissitudes  of  fortune,  managed  to  maintain  the  position  of  the 
family.  He  defeated  the  combined  armies  of  Sindhia  and  the  Peshwa  in 
1802,  and  took  possession  of  the  Peshwa's  capital  of  Poona;  which,  how- 
ever, reverted  to  the  Peshwa  by  British  intervention  after  the  Treaty  of 
Bassein  in  the  same  year.  Again,  after  the  Treaty  of  Sarji  Anjengaon,  war 
ensued  between  Jeswant  Rao  Holkar  and  the  Paramount  Power,  with  varying 
fortune,  till  at  length,  in  1805,  Holkar  was  forced  to  surrender  to  Lord  Lake, 
and  sign  a  treaty  on  the  banks  of  the  river  Bias  in  the  Punjab.  He  died  in 
1811,  leaving  a  minor  son,  Malhar  Rao  Holkar;  and  the  administration  was 
carried  on  by  Tulsi  Bai,  one  of  the  concubines  of  the  late  Maharaja,  as 
Queen  Regent.  She  was  murdered  in  1 8 1 7  by  her  own  officers ;  but  the 
Indore  army  was  defeated  by  the  British  forces  at  the  battle  of  Mehidpur, 
and  the  Treaty  of  Mandesar  followed  in  1818,  by  which  Malhar  Rao  Holkar 
became  a  feudatory  Prince  of  the  British  Empire.  He  died  in  1833  with- 
out issue.  Martand  Rao  Holkar  was  adopted  as  his  successor,  but  was 
speedily  deposed  by  his  cousin,  Hari  Rao  Holkar.  The  latter,  dying  in  1843 
without  issue,  was  succeeded  by  his  adopted  son,  Khandi  Rao,  who  died  in 
1844,  and  was  succeeded  by  adoption  by  His  late  Highness  the  Maharaj- 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK   OF  INDIA  195 

Adhiraj  Tukaji  Rao  Holkar,  father  of  the  present  Chief.  Tukaji  Rao  was 
only  eleven  years  old  at  the  date  of  his  accession,  and  was  the  second  son  of 
Bhao  Holkar.  In  1852  he  attained  his  majority,  and  was  invested  with  the 
full  management  of  the  State.  In  1857  the  Indore  army  mutinied,  and 
besieged  the  British  Resident,  Sir  Henry  Durand,  at  Indore,  who  was  ex- 
posed to  much  difficulty  and  danger  in  taking  off  the  women  and  children  to 
a  place  of  safety  at  Bhopal.  The  Maharaja,  however,  remained  loyal,  and  his 
rebellious  troops  soon  after  were  forced  to  lay  down  their  arms.  The  Maha- 
raja subsequently  received  a  sanad  of  adoption,  an  increased  personal  salute, 
and  the  rank  of  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of 
the  Star  of  India.  He  died  in  1886,  and  was  succeeded  by  the  present 
Maharaj-Adhiraj  Bahadur.  His  Highness  has  visited  England,  and  is  known 
as  a  Prince  of  great  enlightenment  and  ability.  Like  his  illustrious  father,  he 
has  received  the  rank  of  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  The  area  of  his  State  is  8400  square  miles  ;  its 
population  about  1,055,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  about  73,000 
Muhammadans,  and  86,000  belonging  to  various  aboriginal  tribes.  In  size 
the  State  of  Indore  may  be  compared  with  the  kingdoms  of  Saxony  or 
Wiirtemberg,  but  is  larger  than  either.  In  population  it  may  be  compared 
with  the  Grand  Duchies  of  Hesse  or  Baden,  being  more  populous  than  the 
former,  and  less  so  than  the  latter.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force 
of  3231  cavalry,  6128  infantry,  and  65  guns.  He  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of 
2 1  guns  within  the  limits  of  Indore  territory,  and  1 9  guns  elsewhere. 

Residence. — Indore,  Central  India. 


196  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


INDRA  BIKRAMA  SINGH  (of  Raipur  Ikdaria,  Itaunja),  Rdjd. 

Born  24th  November  1864.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been 
assumed  by  Rai  Dingar  Deo,  ancestor  of  the  Raja,  and  having  been 
recognised  as  hereditary  by  the  Government  in  1877.  Belongs  to  a 
Puar  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  of  the  Vasishta  Gotra  or  clan ;  tracing  their 
descent  from  Deo  Ridh  Rai,  eighth  son  of  Raja  Rudra  Sah  of  Dharanagar  or 
Deogarh,  who  took  service  under  the  King  of  Delhi,  and  obtained  from  him 
important  commands.  The  Rajas  have  before  their  residence  a  large  square 
stone,  which  they  hold  in  almost  sacred  reverence.  They  say  that  they 
brought  it  from  Delhi,  and  that  it  is  the  symbol  of  their  right  to  the  estates 
granted  to  them  by  the  Emperors  of  Delhi.  The  late  Raja  Jagmohan  Singh 
died  in  1881,  four  months  after  attaining  his  majority,  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  brother,  the  present  Raja,  then  sixteen  years  old,  as  a  minor  under  the  Court 
of  Wards.  Educated  at  Canning  College,  Lucknow ;  attained  his  majority, 
and  received  possession  of  his  estate  2nd  January  1886. 

Residence. — Itaunja,  Mahona,  Lucknow,  Oudh. 


INGHAR  SINGH,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Charkhdri,  Central  India. 


ISHRI  PARSHAD  TBWARI,  Rai. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Central  Provinces. 


ISHRI  SINGH  (of  Nadaun),  Mian. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     Is  a  near  relative  of  the  Raja  Amar  Chand  of 
Nadaun  (q.vl),  and  a  descendant  of  the  Raja  Sir  Jodhbir  Chand,  K.C.S.I. 
Residence. — Ka"ngra,  Punjab. 


ISHWAR  DAS,  Rai  Bahadur,  Rdjd  Ddyawant. 

Born  1 3th  June  1826.  The  titles  are  personal,  and  having  been  con- 
ferred by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic,  were  recognised  by  the  Government 
1890.  His  grandfather,  the  Rah  Raja  Makhan  Lai  Bahadur,  and  his  father, 
Rai  Raja  Tikam  Chand  Bahadur,  both  successively  held  important  posts 
under  the  Nawabs  of  the  Carnatic.  Belongs  to  a  Kayastha  family,  claiming 
descent  from  the  famous  Chitragupta.  Has  received  the  thanks  of  Govern- 
ment for  his  public  services  and  his  benevolence.  His  adopted  son  is  named 
Lachmi  Das. 

Residence. — Madras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  197 

ISHWAR  DAS,  PANDIT,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Peshdwar,  Punjab. 

JABBIA  BHIL  and  JABRI,  MIAN  YUSUF  MUHAMMAD, 

Midn  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1874;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  loth  May  1888  as  a  minor.  Belongs 
to  a  Pindari  (Muhammadan)  family,  descended  from  Rajan  Khan,  brother  of 
the  Pindari  leader  Chitu.  The  State  is  tributary  to  Gwalior,  and  contains  a 
population  of  about  1000,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Jabria  Bhil,  Bhopdl,  Central  India. 

JADAB  CHANDAR  BARUA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  August  1888. 
Residence. — Nowgong,  Assam. 

JADU.     See  Yadu. 


JADUNATH  DEO  (of  Aul),  Kumar. 

Is  the  son  of  the  late  Raja  Padmalabh  Deo  of  Aul,  who  was  born  in 
1830,  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1840,  and  has  recently  died.  Is  descended 
from  the  ancient  Royal  family  of  Orissa.  The  Maharaja  Makund  Deo,  the 
last  Maharaja  of  Orissa,  was  conquered  by  the  Raja  Man  Singh  (see  Jodhpur) 
as  Viceroy  of  the  Mughal  Emperor  towards  the  close  of  the  1 6th  century. 
When  subsequently  Ram  Chandra  Deo,  belonging  to  another  family,  was 
proclaimed  Maharaja  of  Orissa  by  the  headmen  of  the  country,  his  title  was 
disputed  by  the  two  surviving  sons  of  Makund  Deo,  of  whom  the  elder  was 
also  called  Ram  Chandra  Deo,  and  the  disputes  were  finally  settled  by  Raja 
Man  Singh  in  1580  A.D.,  who  appointed  Ram  Chandra  Deo,  the  son  of 
Maharaja  Makund  Deo,  to  be  Raja  of  Aul,  and  his .  brother  to  be  Raja  of 
Sarungar  of  Patiya,  while  the  other  Ram  Chandra  Deo  was  made  Raja  of 
Khurda.  In  1803  the  Raja  of  Aul  acknowledged  fealty  to  the  British 
Government. 

Residence. — Aul,  Orissa,  Bengal. 

JADUNATH  HALDAfe,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  5th  April  1832.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th 
May  1889.  His  great-grandfather  was  in  the  service  of  the  Nawab  of  Mur- 
shidabad  in  Bengal,  and  was  granted  by  him  the  appellation  of  Haldar,  which 
his  descendants  retain  as  their  family  name.  After  the  British  conquest  of 
Bengal  he  was  appointed  Tahsildar  of  Khas  Mahal  in  Barrackpore.  During 


198  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

the  Mutiny  the  Rai  Bahadur  was  a  prisoner  in  the  hands  of  the  rebels  for 
five  months,  and  has  subsequently  rendered  excellent  service  in  the  Police  of 
the  North-Western  Provinces. 

Residence. — Allahabad,  North-Western  Provinces. 

JADUNATH  MUKHARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  22nd  May  1876,  "for 
liberality  displayed  by  him  in  various  matters  of  public  progress  and  im- 
provement." Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction, 
2nd  January  1893. 

Residence. — Haza*ribagh,  Bengal. 


JAFAR  ALI  KHAN,  CJ.E. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  25th  June  1887.  Is  an  officer  in  Her  Majesty's  Army,  with  the 
rank  of  Risalddr. 

Residence. — C  alcutta. 

JAFAR  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal.  Is  the  grandson  of  the  late  Amjad  Ali  Shah,  King 
of  Oudh,  being  the  younger  son  of  Nizam-ud-daula,  who  married  a  daughter 
of  the  King. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

JAFARABAD,  Chief  of .     See  Janjira. 

JAGADINDRA  NATH  RAI  (of  Ndtor),  Maharaja. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877.  Belongs  to 
a  Saritra  Brahman  family,  who  were  eminent  for  many  generations  as  Maha- 
rajas of  Nator,  and  at  one  time  owned  the  greater  portion  of  the  Rajshahi 
district.  It  is  stated  that  the  title  of  Maharaja  Bahadur  was  conferred  on 
Ram  Jiban  Rai  by  the  Emperor  of  Delhi,  and  another  sanad  from  Delhi  was 
conferred  on  his  grandson,  the  Maharaja  Ram  Krishna  Rai  Bahadur  of 
Nator.  His  son  was  the  Maharaja  Bisvanath  Rai  Bahadur  of  Nator,  who  is 
said  by  the  family  to  have  been  granted  a  political  pension  by  the  British 
Government  in  1806.  His  grandson  was  the  Maharaja  Gobindanath  Rai 
Bahadur  of  Nator,  the  (adoptive)  father  of  the  present  Maharaja. 

Residence. — Ndtor,  Rajshdhi,  Bengal. 

JAGADISHWAR  fcHATTARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1 7th  March  1846.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd 
January  1888,  for  long  and  approved  service  in  the  Opium  Department,  in 
which  he  held  an  important  position.  Belongs  to  a  Brahman  family  of 
Bengal. 

Residence. — Ghdzipur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  199 

JAGANNADHA  RAO,  VALLURI,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Vizianagram,  Madras. 

JAGAT  BAHADUR  (of  Umri),  Rdjd. 

Born  iyth  November  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  October  1872. 
The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  the  senior  representative  of  the  ancient  Bilkhari 
(Rajput)  Chiefs  of  Fort  Bilkhar,  the  vast  ruins  of  which  remain  to  this  day  in 
the  mauza  of  Agyapur ;  descended  from  Ghaibar  Sah,  fourth  son  of  Jaswant, 
and  great-grandson  of  Balbhaddar  Dikhit,  who  built  Fort  Bilkhar  after  the  fall  of 
Kanauj.  About  600  years  ago  one  of  his  descendants,  Raja  Ram  Deo,  was 
the  Bilkharia  Chief  of  Patti  and  Fort  Bilkhar,  but  was  deposed  by  his  son-in- 
law,  Bariar  Singh  Bachgoti  (see  Madho  Prasad  Singh,  Rai),  who  slew  his  son 
Dalpat  Sah,  and  seized  the  fort,  leaving  only  a  few  villages  to  the  descendants 
of  Raja  Ram  Deo.  The  present  Raja  has  a  son  and  heir,  named  Lai 
Krishna  Pal  Singh. 

Residence. — Umri,  Partdbgarh,  Oudh. 

JAGAT  SINGH,  Sarddr  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal. 
Residence. — Sia"lkot,  Punjab. 

JAGATPAL  BAHADUR  SINGH  (of  Raipur  Bichaur),  Rai. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  the  son  of  the  late  Rai  Jagmohan  Singh  (who 
died  on  Qth  April  1886)  and  of  the  Thakurain  Sultan  Kunwar,  who  now 
holds  the  estate  of  Raipur  Bichaur  as  the  heir  of  her  late  husband  (see 
Sultan  Kunwar,  Thakurain).  Belongs  to  the  Bachgoti  clan  of  Rajputs  (see 
Ranbijai  Bahadur  Singh,  Diwan),  and  is  descended  from  Hirda  Singh  of  Patti 
Saifabad.  In  1818  Rai  Pirthipal  Singh  held  the  estate,  and  was  dispossessed 
by  the  Nawab  Nazim,  but  restored  after  three  years. 

Residence. — Raipur  Bichaur,  Partdbgarh,  Oudh. 

JAGJIWANDAS  KHUSHALDAS,  Rao  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 

JAGJODH  SINGH,   Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Is  the  son  of  the  late  Kunwar  Peshawara  Singh 
of  the  Lahore  family.  « 

Residences. — Sidlkot,  Punjab  ;  and  Bahraich,  Oudh. 

JAGNISHAN  SINGH,  C.I.E.   (of  Atra  Chandapur),  Rdjd. 
Born   2ist  August   1841;    succeeded    1864.     The   title    is    hereditary. 
Belongs  to  the  great  Kanhpuria  (Rajput)  family  (see  Surpal  Singh  Bahadur,  Raja 


200  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

of  Tiloi),  being  descended  from  Raja  Madan  Singh  of  Simrauta,  third  son  of 
Prasad  Singh,  who  was  seventh  in  descent  from  Kanh,  the  Kshatriya  founder 
of  Kanhpur  in  the  time  of  the  great  Manik  Chand.  The  seventh  in  descent 
from  Madan  Singh  was  the  Raja  Mandhata  Singh,  who  was  in  possession  of 
Chandapur  at  the  time  of  the  conquest  of  Oudh  by  Saadat  Khan.  The  Raja 
Shiudarshan  Singh  had  half  the  estate  confiscated  at  the  time  of  the  Mutiny 
in  1857.  His  grandson,  the  present  Raja,  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and 
received  a  Medal  of  Honour  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  on  ist 
January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India ;  and  subsequently  for  good  services  he  has 
been  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 
Residence. — Chandapur,  Rai  Bareli,  Oudh. 


JAHAN  KADR  MIRZA  MUHAMMAD  WAHID  ALI 
BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  title  is  personal — a  courtesy  title  of  the  Prince,  as  a  son  of  the  late 
King  of  Oudh. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


JAHANDAD  KHAN  (of  Khanpur),  Rdjd,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  first  title  (Raja)  is  hereditary,  and  the  second  (Khan  Bahadur)  is  per- 
sonal, and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1 88 1 .  Belongs  to  a  family  of  the  Gakkar 
tribe,  who  overran  Kashmir  in  early  times,  and  were  formidable  opponents  of 
the  Emperor  Babar.  Is  the  son  of  Raja  Haidar  Bakhsh  Khan  ;  has  acted  as 
Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  of  the  Punjab.  His  son  and  heir  is  named 
Fazaldad. 

Residence.  —  H  azdra,  Punj  ab. 


JAI  CHAND  (of  Lambagraon),  Raja. 

Born  1870.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred  on  i2th  December 
1851.  Belongs  to  the  Katoch  family  of  Rajputs,  and  is  head  of  the  Kangra 
family.  Raja  Parmad  Chand  died  childless  in  exile  at  Almora,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  relative,  Raja  Partab  Chand,  the  father  of  the  present 
Raja. 

Residence. — Kdngra,  Punjab. 


JAI  SINGH  (of  Guler),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  was  conferred  on  28th  February  1878,  the 
Raja  being  the  brother  of  the  late  Raja  Shamsher  Singh  of  Guler,  and  having 
previously  enjoyed  the  hereditary  title  of  Mian.  His  son  and  heir  is  named 
Rughnath  Singh.  The  family  is  connected  with  that  of  His  Highness  the 
Maharaja  of  Jammu  and  Kashmir  by  marriage.  It  is  an  offshoot  of  the 
families  of  Kangra  and  Lambagraon. 

Residence. — Guler,  Kdngra,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  201 


JAI  SINGH  (of  Siba),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  yth  August  1878.  The  Siba 
family  is  an  offshoot  of  the  Guler  family  (see  Jai  Singh,  of  Guler,  Raja),  which 
itself  was  an  offshoot  of  that  of  Kangra.  Is  descended  from  Sibaru  Chand,  a 
younger  son  of  the  Raja  of  Guler,  who  conquered  the  Siba  territory,  calling 
it  Siba  after  his  own  name.  Raja  Ram  Singh,  the  last  of  the  old  hereditary 
Rajas  of  Siba,  died  without  male  issue  in  1875.  The  territory  lapsed  to  the 
Paramount  Power,  but  as  an  act  of  favour  to  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of 
Jammu  and  Kashmir,  who  is  related  to  the  family  by  marriage,  the  territory 
and  title  was  continued  to  a  scion  of  the  family  named  Raja  Bije  Singh.  He 
died  in  1878,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  Raja. 

Residence. — Siba,  Kdngra,  Punjab. 

JAIBANS  KUNWAR  (of  Kaithola),  Rdni. 

Born  1849.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Chief  of  Kaithola  is  the  head 
of  the  great  Kanhpuria  family  (see  Surpal  Singh  and  Jagnishan  Singh),  being 
the  representative  of  Sahas,  the  eldest  son  of  Kanh.  From  him  a  line  of 
twenty  descents  from  father  to  son  ends  in  the  late  Raja  Mahesh  Bakhsh  of 
Kaithola,  who  died  without  male  issue  in  1881.  The  estates  were  under 
Government  management  for  some  time,  and  were  then  handed  over  to  the 
present  Rani,  the  widow  of  the  late  Raja. 

Residence. — Parta"bgarh,  Oudh. 

JAIKISHAN  DAS,  C.S.I.,  Raja  Bahadur. 

Born  24th  November  1832.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred 
on  1 8th  January  1860.  Belongs  to  a  family  of  Chaube  Brahmans,  who  fled 
to  Etah  from  Muttra  in  the  reign  of  Ala-ud-din  Ghori,  because  they  had  slain 
the  Kazi  of  Muttra.  Chaube  Ghansham  Das,  having  long  been  in  Govern- 
ment service,  and  having  retired  on  pension,  in  1857  rendered  most  valuable 
aid  to  the  Government,  although  blind  and  infirm;  and  ultimately  was 
surprised  and  slain  by  the  rebels  at  Kasganj.  His  brother,  the  present  Raja" 
Jai  Kishan  Das  Bahadur,  had  loyally  supported  him,  and  was  rewarded  with 
the  title  and  a  grant  of  lands  and  other  honours  in  1860.  He  was  created 
a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  in  1870.  Is  a 
Fellow  of  the  Allahabad  University,  and  Deputy  Collector  of  Bareilly. 

Residence. — Moradabad,  North- Western  Provinces. 

JAIMAL  SINGH  (of  Thalia),  Sarddr. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Jalandhar,  Punjab. 

JAIPRAKASH  LAL,  C.I.B.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal;  and  was  conferred  on  3ist  August  1881.  The 
Rai  Bahadur  was  for  many  years  the  Diwan  of  the  Dumraon  Raj,  and 
rendered  excellent  service  in  that  capacity.  On  25th  May  1892  he  was 
created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 

Residence, — Dumraon,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JAIPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SIB  MADHO  SINGH 
BAHADUR,  G. C.S.I.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 86 1  ;  ascended  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i8th  September  1880,  and 
was  invested  with  full  governing  powers  on  attaining  his  majority  in  September 

1882.  Is  the  Chief  of  the  famous 
Kachhwaha  tribe  of  Rajputs,  de- 
scended from  the  legendary  hero 
Rama,  and  therefore  of  the  Surya- 
vansi  or  Solar  race.  Tod  devotes 
a  large  part  of  his  learned  Annals  of 
Rdjdsthdn  to  the  history  of  this 
family,  which,  indeed,  is  no  unim- 
portant part  of  the  history  of  India. 
Tod  says  of  the  ruling  family  of 
Jaipur  (otherwise  called  Amber  or 
Dhundar) :  "  A  family  which  traces 
its  lineage  from  Rama  of  Koshala, 
Nala  of  Nishida,  and  Dola  the  lover 
of  Maroni,  may  be  allowed  'the 
boast  of  heraldry';  and  in  remembrance  of  this  descent,  the  Cushites  [Kach- 
hwaha] of  India  celebrate  with  great  solemnity  the  annual  feast  of  the  sun, 
on  which  a  stately  car,  called  the  Chariot  of  the  Sun,  Surya  ratha,  drawn  by 
eight  horses,  is  brought  from  the  temple,  and  the  descendant  of  Ramesa, 
ascending  therein,  perambulates  his  capital." 

The  full  title  of  the  Maharaja  is — His  Highness  Saramad-i-Rajaha-i-Hin- 
dustan  Raj  Rajendra  Sri  Maharaj-Adhiraj  Sawai  Sir  Madho  Singh  Bahadur, 
Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India 
(see  Introduction,  §  u). 

From  Rama,  the  hero  of  the  Rdmdyana,  the  greatest  of  the  legendary 
heroes  of  India,  to  Dhola  Rao,  the  founder  of  the  Jaipur  State  in  967  A.D., 
there  are  enumerated  34  generations ;  and  from  Dhola  Rao  to  the  present 
Maharaja,  106  generations.  Early  in  the  nth  century  a  descendant  of 
Dhola  Rao  named  Hamaji  conquered  Amber  from  the  Minas,  and  fixed 
his  court  there;  and  Amber  remained  the  capital  of  the  dynasty  until 
the  time  of  Jai  Singh  II.,  who  transferred  it  to  Jaipur  in  1728.  In  the 
time  of  the  Great  Mughal,  the  Emperor  Akbar,  Raja  Bhagwan  Das  of 
Jaipur  was  one  of  the  first  Princes  of  the  Empire.  Overcoming  Rajput  pride 
of  race,  he  gave  his  daughter  in  marriage  to  the  Emperor's  son  and  heir, 
Prince  Salim,  afterwards  the  Emperor  Jahangir,  and  was  himself  one  of  the 
greatest  Imperial  commanders.  But  his  adopted  son  and  successor,  the 
Raja  Man  Singh,  was  the  most  famous  of  all  the  Imperial  generals.  He  and 
his  Rajputs  carried  the  arms  of  the  Empire  successfully  into  Orissa,  Bengal, 
Assam,  and  Kabul ;  the  chronicles  of  the  age  are  full  of  the  exploits  of  the 
brother-in-law  of  the  Emperor,  and  he  was  successively  Governor  of  Kabul, 
Bengal,  Behar,  and  the  Deccan.  His  nephew,  the  Raja  Jai  Singh,  known  as 
the  Mirza  Raja,  was  equally  famous  throughout  the  wars  of  Aurangzeb  in  the 
Deccan ;  he  it  was  who  effected  the  capture  of  the  famous  Sivaji,  founder  of 
the  Mahratta  Power ;  and  he  is  said  to  have  fallen  a  victim  to  the  jealousy  of 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  203 

the  Emperor,  who  caused  his  death  by  poison.  Some  generations  later,  in 
the  time  of  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah,  the  second  Jai  Singh  was  famous, 
not  only  as  a  warrior,  but  also  as  an  astronomer.  He  built  observatories  at 
Jaipur  (to  which  place  he  removed  his  capital  from  the  hills  of  Amber,  five 
miles  off),  Delhi,  Benares,  Muttra,  and  Ujjain.  After  the  death  of  the  Raja 
Jai  Singh  II.,  the  subsequent  history  of  the  family  is  much  occupied  with 
leagues  with  Udaipur  and  Jodhpur  against  the  Imperial  Power,  with  contests 
with  Jodhpur  for  the  honour  of  marrying  a  Princess  of  Udaipur,  with  Rajput 
rivalries  and  defections,  and  with  Mahratta  raids.  In  order  to  regain  the 
privilege  of  marrying  Princesses  of  the  House  of  Udaipur — which  honour 
they  had  forfeited  by  marrying  a  daughter  to  the  Mughal  Emperor — the 
Rajas  of  Jaipur  agreed  that  the  issue  of  a  marriage  with  an  Udaipur  Princess 
should  succeed  to  the  Raj  even  before  an  elder  brother  by  another  Rani  ; 
and  this  promise,  coupled  with  the  rivalry  of  the  Rajas  of  Jodhpur  for  the 
same  privilege,  produced  endless  troubles  and  disasters.  In  the  time  of  the 
Raja  Jagat  Singh,  Amir  Khan,  the  notorious  Pindari  leader  (afterwards  Nawab 
of  Tonk),  sided  first  with  the  Raja  of  Jaipur  against  Jodhpur,  and  then  with 
the  Raja  of  Jodhpur  against  Jaipur ;  and  devastated  each  country  in  turn. 
At  last,  in  1 8 1 8,  the  British  Government  intervened ;  took  the  Jaipur  State 
under  its  protection,  and  the  Raja  became  one  of  the  great  feudatories. 

The  late  Maharaja  Sawai  Ram  Singh  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1835. 
He  rendered  excellent  service  throughout  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  again  in 
the  famine  of  1868.  As  a  reward,  he  twice  received  an  increase  to  his 
salute';  he  was  created  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India ;  and  on  the  occasion  of  the  Imperial  Assemblage 
at  Delhi,  on  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India,  he  was  appointed  a  Councillor  of  the  Empire,  and  received  a  suitable 
addition  to  his  titles  and  territory.  The  banner  of  His  Highness  that  was 
unfurled  at  Delhi  on  that  auspicious  occasion  was  exceedingly  interesting,  as 
showing  the  close  approximation  of  Rajput  and  European  heraldic  devices ; 
for  the  Rajput  Pancharanga  was  properly  rendered  as  "  A  Barry  of  5 — gules, 
vert,  argent,  azure,  or  " ;  and  the  solar  lineage  of  the  Kachhwaha  Prince  was 
indicated  by  the  device  "In  chief  a  Sun  in  its  splendour."  The  late 
Maharaja  died  in  1880;  and  was  succeeded  by  his  adopted  son,  a  scion  of 
the  Kachhwaha  race,  the  present  Maharaja. 

The  area  of  the  State  is  14,465  square  miles;  and  its  population 
2,534,357,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  more  than  170,000  Muhammadans 
and  nearly  50,000  Jains.  Jaipur  is  therefore  larger  than  either  Holland  or 
Belgium,  and  more  populous  than  Greece.  The  Maharaja  maintains  a 
military  force  of  3578  cavalry,  16,099  infantry,  and  281  guns;  and  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  19  guns  (including  2  guns  personal).  There  are 
many  Rajput  Chiefs  who  are  feudatories  of  His  Highness. 

Arms. — Barry  of  5,  gules,  vert,  argent,  azure,  or;  in  chief  a  Sun  in  its 
splendour.  Crest. — A  kuchnar  tree  proper,  bearing  cinquefoils  argent.  Sup- 
porters.— A  tiger  and  a  white  horse.  Motto. — "  Jato  Dharma  Stato  Jayo." 

Residence. — Jaipur,  Rdjputdna. 


204  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JAISALMIR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAWAL  SALIVAHAN 
BAHADUR,  Mahdrdwal  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1886;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i2th  April  1891.  Is  the 
Chief  of  the  Jadu  Bhatti  Rajputs,  claiming  direct  descent  from  the  divine 
Krishna,  and  undoubtedly  boasting  a  lineage  hardly  less  ancient  than  that  of 
the  great  Maharana  of  Udaipur  himself.  The  tribe  takes  its  name  from 
Bhati,  who  was  its  leader  in  very  remote  ages,  when  settled  in  the  Punjab ; 
whence  it  appears  to  have  been  driven  by  conquerors  from  Ghazni,  and  to 
have  gone  to  the  oasis  of  the  Great  Indian  Desert,  which  it  has  ever  since 
inhabited.  Deoraj,  born  in  836  A.D.,  was  the  first  to  take  the  title  of  Rawal, 
and  he  founded  the  city  of  Deorawal.  One  of  his  descendants,  the  Rawal 
Jaisal,  founded  the  city  of  Jaisalmir,  and  built  a  strong  fort  there,  about  the 
year  1156  A.D.  More  than  a  century  later,  when  Mulraj  II.  was  Rawal, 
Jaisalmir  was  captured  and  sacked  by  the  Moslem  troops  of  the  Emperor 
Ala-ud-din,  in  1294  A.D.,  after  a  siege  that  had  lasted  eight  years;  and  this 
was  the  occasion  of  one  of  the  great  Sakas  so  famous  in  Rajput  history — 
when  Mulraj  and  his  warriors,  having  slain  all  their  women  and  children, 
cased  themselves  in  armour,  put  on  the  saffron  robe,  bound  the  mor  or 
nuptial  crown  on  their  heads,  and  then  sword  in  hand  sallied  forth  to  die 
amid  the  slaughtered  heaps  of  the  foe.  Again  a  similar  disaster  befell  the 
city  in  1306  A.D.,  not  long  after  it  had  been  repaired  by  the  Rawal  Dudu. 
Finally,  in  the  reign  of  the  Rawal  Sabal  Singh,  the  brave  Bhattis  were  com- 
pelled to  become  feudatories  of  the  Emperor  Shah  Jahan.  Outlying  pro- 
vinces were  subsequently  wrested  from  them  by  the  neighbouring  States  of 
Jodhpur  and  Bikanir ;  till  at  length  in  1 8 1 8,  under  the  rule  of  the  Rawal 
Mulraj,  the  State  came  under  the  protection  and  control  of  the  British  Power, 
and  has  enjoyed  the  blessings  of  peace.  On  the  death  of  the  Rawal  Ranjit 
Singh,  his  younger  brother,  the  late  Maharawal  Bairi  Sal,  succeeded  to  the 
gadi  in  1864 ;  and  he  was  succeeded  in  1891  by  the  present  Maharawal. 

The  area  of  Jaisalmir  is  16,447  square  miles;  its  population  about  109,000, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  about  28,000  Muhammadans.  In  extent  it  may 
be  compared  with  Switzerland  or  Holland ;  but  is  larger  than  either.  His 
Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  140  cavalry,  353  infantry,  and  25 
guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 5  guns. 

Residence. — Jaisalmir,  Rdjputdna. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  205 

JAISINGH  RAO  ANGRIA,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Baroda. 

JALAL-UD-DIN,  KAZI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

An  Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  in  Baluchistan.     Granted  the  title  of 
Khan  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Quetta,  Baluchistan. 

JALAL-UD-DIN,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  tne 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Karndl,  Punjab. 

JALAM  SINGH  (of  Amoda),  Rdwat. 

The  title  is  hereditary ;  and  the  present  Rawat  succeeded  to  the  title  and 
estates  on  the  death  of  his  father,  the  late  Rawat  Lakshmi  Singh  of  Amoda. 
Belongs  to  a  Tuar  Rajput  family,  descended  from  Jet  Singh. 

Residence. — Amoda,  Nima"r,  Central  Provinces. 

JALIA  DBVANI,  JARB JA  MANSINGH JI,  Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1852;   succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  3ist  December  1868. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.     The  area  of  the  State  is  about  36 
square  miles;  its  population  2383,  chiefly  Hindus.     The  Talukdar  maintains 
a  military  force  of  4  cavalry  and  3  5  infantry. 
Residence. — Jdlia  Deva"ni,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay. 

JAM  KHAN  walad  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
who  were  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

JAMIAT  SINGH  (of  Ghoriwaha),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  of  a  Jat  family,  descended  from 
Sardar  Sukha  Singh,  who  in  1759  established  his  power  at  Ghoriwaha  in  the 
Hoshiarpur  district.  The  family  subsequently  fell  under  the  power  of  the 
Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore.  Sukha  Singh's  grandson  was  the  Sardar 
Partab  Singh,  father  of  the  present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Hoshiarpur,  Punjab. 

JAMKHANDI,  RAM  CHANDRA  RAO  GOPAL,  Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Chief  of  Jamkhandi  also  bears  the  name  of  Appa  Sahib  Patwardhan. 
Born  1834;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i8th  November  1840. 
Belongs  to  a  Brahman  (Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  his  State  is  492  square 
miles;  its  population  is  83,917,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  7628  Muham- 
madans.  The  Chief  maintains  a  military  force  of  52  cavalry,  943  infantry, 
and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Jamkhandi,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 


206  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JAMMU  AND  KASHMIR,  COLONEL  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHA- 
RAJA PARTAB  SINGH  INDAR  MAHINDAR  BAHADUR 
SIPAR-I-SALTANAT,  G.C.S.I.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gctdi  i2th  September  1885.  Is  the  son 
of  the  late  Maharaja  Ranbhir  Singh,  G.C.S.I.  ;  and  grandson  of  the  late 
Maharaja  Ghulab  Singh,  the  founder  of  the  dynasty,  who  was  constituted 
Feudatory  Chief  of  the  hill-territories  east  of  the  Indus  and  west  of  the  Ravi 
(with  certain  specified  exceptions)  by  the  treaty  of  March  1846,  concluded 
after  the  close  of  the  first  Sikh  war.  Belongs  to  a  Dogra  or  Jamwal  Rajput 
family  (Hindu)  of  ancient  lineage,  claiming  descent  from  that  of  the  former 
Rajas  of  Jammu.  The  Maharaja  Ghulab  Singh  was  the  great-grandson  of 
the  Raja  Dharabdeo ;  and  a  grandson  of  the  Mian  Jorawar  Singh,  who  was  a 
brother  of  Raja  Ranjit  Deo.  He  began  life  as  a  cavalry  soldier,  and  became 
a  trusted  officer  under  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore,  who  conferred  on 
him  the  principality  of  Jammu.  At  the  outbreak  of  the  first  Sikh  war  he 
had  been  elected  Minister  of  the  Khalsa,  and  was  one  of  the  most  con- 
spicuous Sikh  leaders ;  and  after  the  battle  of  Sobraon  he  negotiated  a 
separate  treaty  with  the  British  Power,  by  which  he  acquired  the  Feudal 
Chiefship  of  Jammu  and  Kashmir  on  payment  of  a  sum  of  75  lakhs  of 
rupees.  In  the  Mutiny  of  1857  he  rendered  excellent  service,  and  sent 
a  contingent  to  Delhi.  He  died  in  August  1857,  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  third  and  only  surviving  son,  the  late  Maharaja  Ranbhir  Singh,  G.C.S.I., 
who  was  a  munificent  patron  of  learning,  and  did  good  service  in  connection 
with  the  British  Mission  to  Yarkand.  He  had  the  distinguished  honour  of 
receiving  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales  at  Jammu  in  1876;  he 
also  had  his  salute  raised  to  21  guns,  by  the  addition  of  2  guns  as  a 
personal  distinction.  In  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclama- 
tion of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  he  was  gazetted  a  General  in  the 
Army,  and  created  a  Councillor  of  the  Empress.  The  Maharaja  died  on 
1 2th  September  1885,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son,  the  present 
Maharaja,  who  was  created  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India  on  25th  May  1892.  The  area  of  his  State  is 
79,784  square  miles;  and  its  population  is  about  1,500,000,  including 
nearly  a  million  Muhammadans,  about  half-a-million  Hindus,  and  over 
20,000  Buddhists.  In  point  of  area,  the  State  is  more  than  double  the 
combined  area  of  Bavaria  and  Saxony,  and  equal  to  that  of  any  three  or  four 
of  the  smaller  European  kingdoms  put  together.  His  Highness  maintains  a 
military  force  of  about  8000  cavalry  and  infantry,  and  288  guns;  and  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  2 1  guns  within  the  limits  of  the  State,  and  to  one  of  1 9 
guns  in  the  rest  of  India. 

Residence. — Srinagar,  Kashmir  ;  and  Jammu,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  207 

JAMNIA,  BHUMIA  HAMIR  SINGH,  Bkumia  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1855  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1863  as  a  minor.  Belongs  to  a 
Bhilala  family — the  Bhilalas  being  reputed  to  spring  from  the  intermarriage 
of  Rajputs  and  Bhils.  The  founder  of  the  family  was  Nadir  Singh,  a  famous 
Bhumia  of  Jamnia. 

Residence. — Kunjrod,  Jamnia,  Bhopa*war,  Central  India. 

JAMSHEDJI  DHANJIBHAI  WADIA,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Bombay. 

JAMSHEDJI  FRAMJI  PALKIWALA,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

JAMSHEDJI  RUSTAMJI,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i8th  August  1881. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

JAN  MUHAMMAD  WALI  ALI  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mtr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
who  were  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 
Residence. — Sind. 

JANAK  PRIYA,  RdnL 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Rani  being  the  last 
surviving  Rani  of  the  late  Raja  Narayan  Singh  of 
Sambalpur.  The  Rajas  of  Sambalpur  were  Chauhan 
Rajputs  of  very  ancient  lineage.  Balram  Das 
Chauhan  conquered  Sambalpur  about  the  year 
1445  ;  and  left  it  to  his  elder  son  Raja  Hirda 
Narayan,  while  his  younger  son  became  Raja  of 
Sonpur  (q.v.)  The  Chauhan  device  is  the  chakra 
— a  circle  with  four  tridents  (trisut)  as  radii,  pointing 
The  santak  of  the  Chauhan  north,  east,  south,  and  west,  as  shown  in  the 

Rajputs,  called  Chakra.  used  .  '_.,'.  .  .        ,       .  ,  , 

in  the  seal  and  for  signature,    margin.       1  he   Ram  uses  this  device  on  her  seal, 

(A  circle  with  four  Trisulas  or     and  for  signature. 
Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car- 
dinal points.)  Residence. — Sambalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


208  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JANAKI  BALLABH  SEN  (of  Dimla),  Rdjd. 

.  The  title  was  conferred  "  for  liberality  and  public  spirit,"  on  ist  January 
1891. 

Residence. — Dimla,  Kangpur,  Bengal. 


JANG  BAHADUR  KHAN,  C.IB.  (of  Nanpara),  Rdjd. 

Born  1845.  The  title  is  hereditary ;  and  the  Raja  succeeded  his  father, 
the  late  Raja  Munawar  AH  Khan,  in  1847.  Belongs  to  a  Pathan  family, 
descended  from  Rasul  Khan,  Togh  Pathan,  a  Risaldar  in  the  service  of  the 
Emperor  Shah  Jahan,  who  in  1632  sent  him  to  Salonabad  to  coerce  the 
Banjaras  who  had  overrun  the  jdgir  of  Salona  Begam,  the  wife  of  Prince 
Dara.  For  his  performance  of  this  duty  he  received  the  grant  of  Nanpara. 
In  1763  his  descendant  Karam  Khan  of  Nanpara  obtained  the  title  of  Raja 
from  the  Nawab  Shuja-ud-daula.  The  present  Raja  was  created  a  Companion 
of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  in  1886.  He  is  an 
Honorary  Magistrate;  and  has  a  son  and  heir  named  Muhammad  Sadiq 
Khan,  born  1870. 

Residence. — Bahraich,  Oudh. 


JANI  BIHARI  LAL,  DIWAN,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  1 6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Bhartpur,  Rajputana. 

JANJIRA,  NAWAB  SIDI  AHMAD  KHAN,  Nawdb  of. 
A  Ruling  Prince. 

Born  1863 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  January  1879.  Belongs  to  an 
Abyssinian  family  of  Sunni  Muhammadans,  claiming  descent  from  Sidi 
Sarul  Khan.  The  family  were  Abyssinian  admirals  of  the  fleet  of  the 
Muhammadan  kings  of  Bijapur,  who  in  1670  transferred  their  allegiance 
to  the  Emperor  of  Delhi,  Aurangzeb.  The  Mahrattas  often  tried  to  conquer 
the  island  of  Janjira ;  but  were  always  successfully  resisted.  The  Nawab  is 
also  Chief  of  Jafarabad,  a  small  State  in  Kathiawar.  The  area  of  the  State 
is  324  square  miles;  its  population  is  76,361,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including 
13,912  Muhammadans.  The  Nawab  maintains  a  military  force  of  310 
infantry  and  179  guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Janjira,  Koldba,  Bombay. 


JANJIT  alias  NANBI  RAJA  (of  Darri),  Sawai. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 

Residence. — Sagar,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  209 


JANKI  (of  Pamakheri),  Thdkur. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Sdgar,  Central  Provinces. 

JANKI  KUNWAR  (of  Paraspur),  Rani. 

Born  1839.  The  title  is  hereditary;  the  Rani  succeeded  her  late 
husband,  Raja  Randhir  Singh,  on  i6th  June  1878.  The  head  of  the  family 
is  the  chief  of  the  six  Thakurs  of  Chhedwara,  famous  for  their  turbulence 
in  the  times  before  the  annexation  of  Oudh.  They  claim  descent  from  the 
Kalhans  Rajas  of  Khurasa,  through  Maharaj  Singh,  second  son  of  Achal 
Narayan  Singh.  A  descendant,  named  Newal  Singh,  obtained  the  title  of 
Raja  while  on  a  visit  to  the  Court  at  Delhi ;  and  it  was  recognised  as 
hereditary  in  favour  of  the  late  Raja,  Randhir  Singh.  The  Rani's  son  and 
heir  is  Bikramajit  Singh. 

Residence. — Paraspur,  Gonda,  Oudh. 


JAORA,  MAJOR  HIS  HIGHNESS  IHTISHAM  -  UD  -  DAULA 
NAWAB  MUHAMMAD  ISMAIL  KHAN  BAHADUR  FIROZ 
JANG,  Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1855;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  3oth  April  1865  as  a  minor. 
Belongs  to  a  Pathan  (Muhammadan)  family,  descended  from  Nawab  Ghafur 
Khan,  an  Afghan  of  the  Swati  tribe,  -brother-in-law  of  the  famous  Amir  Khan 
of  Tonk,  whom  he  represented  at  Holkar's  Court.  After  the  battle  Of 
Mehidpur,  Nawab  Ghafur  Khan,  being  in  possession  of  this  territory  as  a 
grant  from  Holkar,  was  confirmed  by  the  British  Government.  The  present 
Nawab  has  been  appointed  an  Honorary  Major  in  the  British  Army.  The 
State,  which  is  feudatory  to  Indore,  has  an  area  of  581  square  miles  ;  and  a 
population  of  119,945,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  13,318  Muhammadans 
and  over  2000  Jains.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  63  cavalry, 
177  infantry,  and  15  guns  ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  13  guns.  Jaora, 
the  capital  of  the  State,  is  a  station  on  the  Rajputana-Malwa  railway.  The 
Nawab  has  a  son  and  heir  named  Muhammad  Sher  Ali  Khan. 

Residence, — Jaora,  Malw£,  Central  India. 


JASDAN,  KHACHAR  ALA  CHELA,  Chief  of . 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1833;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1852.  Belongs  to  a  Kathi 
(Hindu)  family.  The  State,  which  is  tributary  to  Baroda  and  Junagarh, 
contains  an  area  of  283  square  miles;  and  a  population  of  29,037,  chiefly 
Hindus.  The  Chief  maintains  a  military  force  of  60  cavalry,  354  infantry, 
and  5  guns. 

Residence. — Jasdan,  Kathiawar,  Bombay. 

p 


2io  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JASHPUR,  RAJA  PRATAP  NARAYAN  SINGH  DEO 
BAHADUR,  C.I.E.,  JRdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1822  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  24th  October  1845.  Belongs  to  a 
Kshatriya  (Rajput)  family,  formerly  feudatories  of  the  Mahrattas  of  Nagpur, 
that  came  under  British  control  in  1818.  Rendered  good  service  in  the 
military  operations  in  1857  against  the  mutineers  and  rebels  in  Udaipur  and 
Palamau.  Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire,  2  ist  May  1890.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1947  square  miles ; 
its  population  is  90,240,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  has  a  military  force  of 
2  guns. 

Residence. — Jashpur,  Chota  Nagpur,  Bengal. 

JASMBR  SINGH,  Sarddr. 

Bom  1848.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  descended 
from  Sardar  Gurbaksh  Singh,  who  acquired  the  territory  of  Thol  Thangor,  in 
the  Ambala  district  of  the  Punjab,  by  conquest  in  1759  A.D.  During  the 
Sikh  rebellion  of  1848-49,  and  again  in  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  this  family 
rendered  good  service  to  Government,  and  were  rewarded  for  the  latter 
service.  On  the  death  of  Sardar  Jawahir  Singh,  he  was  succeeded  by  his 
two  sons,  the  present  Sardars — Kishan  Singh  and  Jasmer  Singh  of  Thol 
Thangor.  The  Sardar  Jasmer  Singh  has  two  sons — Ram  Narayan  Singh 
(born  1863)  and  Sheo  Narayan  Singh. 

Residence. — Thol  Thangor,  Ambdla,  Punjab. 

JASO,  DIWAN  JAGATRAJ,  JAGIRDAR,  Diwdn  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1860  ;  succeeded  to  \hzgadi  7th  July  1889.  Belongs  to  the  great 
Bundela  Rajput  family,  descended  from  the  founder  of  the  Orchha  State  that 
has  given  ruling  families  to  Panna,  Dattia,  Ajaigarh,  Charkhari,  and  most  of 
the  other  States  of  Bundelkhand.  Bhartichand,  the  founder  of  the  Jaso 
State,  was  the  fourth  son  of  the  Maharaja  Chhatrasal ;  and  his  great-grandson, 
Diwan  Murat  Singh,  received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1816. 
The  Diwan  Bhopal  Singh  received  the  additional  title  of  Bahadur  as  a 
personal  distinction,  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi  on  the  occasion  of 
the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  75  square  miles  ;  its  population  over  80,000,  chiefly 
Hindus.  The  Diwan  maintains  a  military  force  of  2  horsemen,  60  infantry, 
and  4  guns. 

Residence. — Jaso,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

JAS WANT  RAI,  Rat  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign,  in  consideration  of  eminent 
services  in  the  Army  Medical  Department. 

Residence. — Shdhpur,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  211 


JASWANT  SINGH  (of  Nurpur),  Rdjd. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Nurpur  is  a  hill  principality  to  the 
west  of  Guler.  The  Raja  belongs  to  a  Rajput  family,  descended  from  Jit 
Pal,  who  came  from  Delhi  about  700  years  ago,  and  established  himself  at 
Pathankot.  Subsequently  the  family  removed  to  the  hills ;  and  Nurpur 
became  their  capital  in  the  time  of  Raja  Basu,  about  the  year  1640  A.D.  At 
the  time  of  the  conquests  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore,  Raja"  Bir, 
father  of  the  present  Raja,  was  Raja  of  Nurpur.  He  endeavoured  to  resist 
Ranjit  Singh ;  but  being  compelled  to  take  refuge  in  Chamba,  was  given  up 
by  the  Raja  of  Chamba,  and  imprisoned  in  the  fortress  of  Gobindgarh. 
Subsequently  he  was  ransomed  by  his  brother-in-law,  Sardar  Charat  Singh, 
for  Rs.85,ooo ;  and  in  1846  raised  the  standard  of  revolt,  besieged 
Nurpur,  and  died  before  its  walls.  He  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Raja, 
who  has  received  a  large  grant  from  the  British  Government. 

Residence. — Nurpur,  Kdngra,  Punjab. 

JATH,  AMRITRAO  RAO  SAHEB  DAPHLE,  Jdgirddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1835 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  July  1841  as  a  minor.  Belongs 
to  a  Mahratta  (Hindu)  family.  The  late  Jagirdar,  Ramrao,  died  in  1841 
without  issue ;  whereon  his  widow,  Bhagirthibai,  adopted  Amritrao,  the 
present  Jagirdar.  The  Daphle  is  also  Chief  of  Karasgi ;  and  the  jdgir  of 
Daphlapur  (or  Daflapur)  is  also  really  a  part  of  this  State,  and  will  revert  to 
it  on  the  demise  of  the  three  widows  of  the  late  Chief.  The  founder  of  the 
Jath  State  was  the  hereditary  pdtel,  or  headman,  of  Daflapur  village.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  884  square  miles;  its  population  is  49,491,  chiefly 
Hindus,  but  including  2842  Muhammadans. 

Residence. — Jath,  Bijdpur,  Bombay. 

JAWAHIR  LAL,  LALA,  Rai  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — India. 

JAWAHIR  SINGH  (of  Chamdri),  Rao. 

Born  1845.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  granted  by 
the  Raja  Mori  Pahlodh  of  Chanderi,  and  subsequently  confirmed  under 
British  rule. 

Residence. — Chamdri,  Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

JAWASIA,  RAWAT  LAL  SINGH,  Rdwat  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born    1858;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in    1882.     Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family.     The  population  of  the  State  is  about  607,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Jawdsia,  Western  Ma"lwa",  Central  India. 


212  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

JAWHAR,  PATANGSHAH  VIKRAMSHAH  MUKNI,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1855  ;  succeeded  to  thegadi  2Qth  June  1866  as  a  minor.  Belongs 
to  a  Koli  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Jaya  Mukni,  a  freebooter  who 
possessed  himself  of  this  territory  about  1335.  His  son,  Nim  Shah,  obtained 
the  title  of  Raja  from  the  Emperor  of  Delhi  in  the  year  1341.  The  late 
Raja  Vikramshah  died  in  1865  ;  and  his  widow,  the  Rani  Lakshmibai  Saheb, 
adopted  the  present  Raja,  who  was  then  called  Malhar  Rao,  son  of  Madhav- 
rao  Dewrao  Mukni,  a  descendant  of  Raja  Krishna  Shah,  ninth  Raja  of  Jawhar. 
The  State  has  an  area  of  534  square  miles;  and  a  population  of  48,556, 
chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  8  cavalry  and  25 
infantry.  The  family  cognisance  is  an  arrow,  barbed,  point  downward. 

Residence. — Jawhar,  Thdna,  Bombay. 

JBJBBBHOY,  SIR  JAMSETJBB,  Baronet,  C.S.I. 

Born  3rd  March  1851  ;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Sir  Jamsetjee 
Jejeebhoy,  second  Baronet,  in  1877  ;  when  (in  accordance  with  the  special 
Act  of  the  Indian  Legislature  of  1860)  he  assumed 
the  name  of  Jamsetjee  Jejeebhoy  in  lieu  of  Manekjee 
Cursetjee.  Is  the  third  Baronet ;  and  has  been 
created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of 
the  Star  of  India.  Is  a  merchant  of  the  city  of 
Bombay,  a  Magistrate,  and  Member  of  the  Legis- 
lative Council  of  Bombay.  Belongs  to  a  family 
that  has  long  been  regarded  as  the  leaders  of  the 
Parsi  community  of  Western  India.  The  first 
Baronet,  Sir  Jamsetjee  Jejeebhoy,  K.C.B.,  of  Bom- 
bay, was  so  created  in  1857,  in  recognition  of  his 
unbounded  munificence  and  public  spirit,  and  of 
his  undoubted  loyalty.  His  very  great  wealth  was 
used  in  promoting  the  good  of  others ;  and  the  second 
Baronet,  who  died  in  1877,  also  earned  a  similar 
reputation  for  benevolence  and  liberality.  In  1860,  the  special  Act  of  the 
Indian  Legislature,  referred  to  above,  was  passed  with  the  sanction  of  Her 
Most  Gracious  Majesty,  enacting  that  all  future  holders  of  the  title,  on 
succeeding  to  it,  shall  relinquish  their  own  names  and  assume  those  of  the 
first  Baronet.  The  present  Baronet,  in  1869,  married  Jerbai,  daughter  of 
Shapurji  Dhanjibhai,  Esq.  ;  and  has  a  son  and  heir,  Cursetjee,  born  nth 
November  1878.  Sir  Jamsetjee's  brothers  are:  (i)  Co  wasjee  Cursetjee,  born 
25th  November  1852,  married,  in  1869,  Gulbai  Rustamji  Wadia  ;  and  (2) 
Jamsetjee  Cursetjee,  born  1860,  married,  1882,  Awabai  Shapurji  Dhanjibhai. 
The  family  arms  are  azure,  a  sun  rising  above  a  representation  of  the 
Ghats  (mountains  near  Bombay)  in  base,  and  in  chief  two  bees  volant,  all 
proper.  The  crest  is  a  mount  vert,  thereon  a  peacock  amidst  wheat,  and 
in  the  beak  an  ear  of  wheat,  all  proper. 

Residence. — Mazagon  Castle,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  213 

JETPUR,  AZAM  VALA  LAKSHMAN  MERAN,  Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1849;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i;th  September  1883.  Jointly 
rules  Jetpur  with  several  other  Talukdars.  The  State  is  tributary  to  Baroda 
and  Junagarh. 

Residence. — Jetpur,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay. 

JETPUR,  AZAM  VALA  SURAG  GANGA,  Tdlukddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1799;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  September  1847.  Joint- 
Talukdar  of  Jetpur  with  several  others. 

Residence. — Jetpur,  Ka"thia"wa"r,  Bombay. 


JETPUR,  AZAM  VALA  NAJA  KALA  DEODAN,  Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1865  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i4th  June  1890.     Is  Joint-Talukdar 
of  Jetpur  with  several  others. 

Residence. — Jetpur,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay. 


JHABUA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  GOPAL  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  22nd  February  1841  ;  succeeded  to  ft&gadi  as  a  minor  in  October 
1841.  Belongs  to  the  great  Rathor  Rajput  family  of  the  Maharajas  of 
Jodhpur,  Idar,  etc.  The  title  of  Raja  was  bestowed  on  Kishan  Das,  a 
remote  ancestor  of  the  present  Raja,  by  Ala-ud-din,  the  Emperor  of  Delhi, 
as  a  reward  for  a  successful  campaign  in  Bengal,  and  for  punishing  the  Bhil 
Chiefs  of  Jhabua,  who  had  murdered  an  Imperial  Viceroy  of  Gujarat.  The 
State,  which  was  at  one  time  tributary  to  Indore,  has  an  area  of  1336  square 
miles ;  and  a  population  of  92,938,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  nearly 
50,000  belonging  to  the  aboriginal  Bhil  and  other  tribes.  The  State  flag  is 
red.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  64  cavalry,  253  infantry,  and 
4  guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Jhabua,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 


JHALARIA,  Thdkur  of.     See  Jhalera. 


2i4  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JHALAWAR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJ  RANA  ZALIM 
SINGH,  BAHADUR,  Mahdrdj  Rand  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1864  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  24th  June  1876  as  a  minor.  Is  a 
Chief  of  the  Jhala  Rajputs,  whose  ancestors  came  from  Jhalawar  in  Kathia- 
war.  In  1709  A.D.  Bhao  Singh,  a  younger  son  of  the  Chief  of  Halwad  in 
Kathiawar,  took  some  retainers  with  him  and  went  to  Delhi.  His  son 
Madhu  Singh  rose  to  high  favour  and  rank  in  the  service  of  the  Maharaja  of 
Kotah ;  his  sister  was  married  to  the  heir,  and  his  descendants  thus  acquired 
the  title  of  Mama  ("  maternal  uncle  ")  in  Kotah.  Ultimately,  in  1 838,  a  portion 
of  the  State  of  Kotah  was  cut  off,  with  the  consent  of  the  Maharaja  and  of 
the  British  Government,  and  erected  into  the  State  of  Jhalawar,  under  one 
of  Madhu  Singh's  descendants,  Madan  Singh,  son  of  Zalim  Singh,  who  had 
long  been  the  successful  administrator  of  Kotah.  Madan  Singh  received  the 
title  of  Maharaj  Rana.  His  son,  Prithi  Singh,  did  good  service  during  the 
Mutiny ;  and  was  succeeded  in  1876  by  his  adopted  son,  the  present  Maharaj 
Rana,  as  a  minor.  His  Highness  was  educated  at  Mayo  College,  Ajmir; 
and  was  invested  with  full  powers  of  government  on  attaining  his  majority  in 
1884.  The  State  has  an  area  of  2694  square  miles;  and  a  population  of 
340,488,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  20,863  Muhammadans.  His  High- 
ness maintains  a  military  force  of  403  cavalry,  3873  infantry,  and  94  guns  ; 
and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 

Residence. — Jhalra  Patan,  Rdjputdna. 


JHALBRA,  THAKUR  HATTB  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1858  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  22nd  May  1884.     This  is  a  Girdsia 
State,  connected  with  Gwalior. 

Residence. — Jhalera,  Bhopa*!,  Central  India. 


JHARI  GHARKHADI,  NAIK  SUKRONA  walad 
CHAMBARYA  RBSHMA,  Chief  of . 

Born  1850.  Belongs  to  a  Bhil  (aboriginal)  family.  The  State  (which  is 
one  of  the  Dang  States  of  Khandesh)  has  an  area  of  8  square  miles ;  and  a 
population  of  167,  chiefly  Bhils. 

Residence. — Jhari  Gharkhadi,  Khdndesh,  Bombay. 

JIGNI,  RAO  LAKSHMAN  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Rao  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1860;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i6th  September  1871. 
Belongs  to  the  great  Bundela  Rajput  family,  descended  from  the  founder  of 
the  Orchha  State,  which  has  given  ruling  families  to  Panna,  Dattia,  Ajaigarh, 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  215 

Charkhari,  Jaso,  and  most  of  the  States  of  Bundelkhand.  The  founder  of 
Jigni  was  the  Rao  Padam  Singh,  one  of  the  sons  of  the  great  Maharaja 
Chhatarsal.  His  great-grandson  was  the  Rao  Prithi  Singh,  who  received  a 
sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1810.  His  grandson  by  adoption 
(being  adopted  from  the  kindred  ruling  family  of  Panna)  is  the  present  Rao, 
who  received  the  additional  title  of  Bahadur  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of 
Delhi,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India.  The  area  of  the  State  is  2  2  square  miles  :  its  population 
is  3427,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rao  Bahadur  maintains  a  military  force  of  47 
infantry  and  3  guns. 

Residence. — Jigni,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 


JIND,  HIS  HIGHNESS  FARZAND-I-DILBAND  RASIKH-UL- 
ITIKAD  DAULAT-I-INGLISHIA  RAJA-I-RAJAGAN  RAJA 
RANBHIR  SINGH  BAHADUR,  Rdjd  Bahadur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1878  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  7th  March  1887.  Belongs 
to  the  famous  Phulkian  family  of  Sidhu  Jats,  descended  from  Phul,  the 
common  ancestor  of  the  ruling  families  of  Patiala,  Jind,  Nabha,  and  other 
Punjab  States.  Phul  was  twenty-ninth  in  descent  from  the  Rawal  Jaisal 
Singh,  the  head  of  the  Jadu  Bhati  Rajputs,  who  founded  Jaisalmir  in 
1156  A.D.  A  great-grandson  of  Phul,  named  Gajpat  Singh,  obtained  the  title 
of  Raja  of  Jind  from  Shah  Alam,  Emperor  of  Delhi  in  1772.  His  son, 
Raja  Bhag  Singh,  aided  Lord  Lake  in  his  pursuit  of  Holkar  in  1805,  and 
was  accordingly  confirmed  by  the  British  Government  in  his  possessions.  In 
1857  Raja  Sarup  Singh  of  Jind  was  the  first  to  march  against  the  mutineers 
of  Delhi ;  and  he  and  his  troops  took  a  prominent  part  in  the  siege  and 
capture  of  the  city,  for  which  services  he  received  large  extensions  of  his  ter- 
ritory. He  died  in  1864,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  Raja  Ragbir 
Singh,  who  was  created  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted 
Order  of  the  Star  of  India;  and  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi,  ist 
January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India,  he  was  appointed  a  Councillor  of  the  Empress. 
The  present  Raja  succeeded  in  1887.  The  area  of  his  State  is  1259  square 
miles;  and  its  population  is  249,862,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  34,247 
Muhammadans  and  4335  Sikhs.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force 
of  379  cavalry,  1571  infantry,  and  12  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  n 
guns. 

Residence. — Jind,  Punjab. 


JIND  WADO  walad  AMIR  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation. 

Residence. — Shika~rpur,  Sind. 


2I6  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JIT  SINGH  (of  Maheru),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  descended  from  Sardar 
Ramdas  Singh  and  Sardar  Gurdas  Singh,  two  brothers,  who  took  possession  * 
of  Maheru  at  the  time  of  the  decline  of  the  Mughal  Power.  In  1799  A-D-> 
when  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  became  all-powerful  in  the  Punjab,  Sardar 
Charat  Singh  of  Maheru  made  his  submission  to  him,  and  retained  his  pos- 
sessions. His  son,  Sardar  Jawahir  Singh,  succeeded,  and  was  confirmed  in 
eleven  villages.  But  on  his  death,  and  the  succession  of  Sardar  Jaimal 
Singh,  these  were  resumed  with  the  exception  of  Maheru.  The  Sardar 
Jaimal  Singh  did  good  service  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  in  1857,  and  on  his 
death  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Maheru,  Jdlandhar,  Punjab. 


JIWAN  SINGH,  C.I.B.  (of  Buruja),  Sarddr. 

Born  1842.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  family,  descended 
from  Sardar  Nanu  Singh,  who  came  from  Jhawal  Mandan,  in  the  Manjha  or 
central  tract  of  the  Punjab,  in  1759  A.D.,  and  took  possession  of  Buruja  and 
the  surrounding  territory.  The  present  Sardar  did  good  service,  both  in  the 
war  of  1845-46,  when  he  was  a  minor,  and  also  in  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  For 
the  latter  he  received  a  considerable  reward.  He  has  a  son  and  heir,  named 
Gajindar  Singh. 

Residence. — Ambala,  Punjab. 

JIWAN  SINGH,  C.S.I,   (of  SMhzddpur),  Sarddr. 

Born  1860.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  (Sindhu)  family, 
descended  from  Sardar  Dip  Singh,  who  was  the  Mahant  of  the  "  Damdama 
Saheb"  or  resting-place,  which  was  the  retreat  of  the  Guru  Govind  Singh,  the 
tenth  and  last  Sikh  Guru,  after  his  defeat  by  the  Imperial  army  of  Delhi.  A 
large  number  of  Sikhs  assembled  around  Dip  Singh,  who  was  ultimately  slain 
in  a  battle  with  the  Governor  of  Lahore.  Dip  Singh  was  succeeded  by 
Sudha  Singh,  who  fell  in  a  battle  with  the  Governor  of  Jalandhar,  and  has 
always  been  known  among  Sikhs  as  "  Shahid,"  or  the  Martyr,  which  became 
a  family  name.  His  successor  was  Sardar  Karam  Singh,  who  took  possession 
of  some  territory  in  the  Singhpura  district,  which,  with  the  other  Cis-Sutlej 
territories,  came  under  British  control  in  1808-9.  Sardar  Sheo  Kirpal  Singh, 
Shahid,  did  good  service  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  was  re- 
warded by  Government ;  and  his  son  is  the  present  Sardar,  who  was  created 
a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  on  ist  January 
1891. 

Residence. — Shdhzddpur,  Ambdla,  Punjab. 


JIWAN  SINGH  (of  Atari),  Sarddr. 

Born  1835.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Sidhu  Jat  (Rajput) 
family,  descended  from  Kanh  Chand.  His  great-grandson  was  the  famous 
Sardar  Sham  Singh,  whose  daughter  was  betrothed  to  the  Prince  Nau  Nihal 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  217 

Singh,  grandson  of  the  Maharaja  Ran] it  Singh.  When  the  Sikh  army  in- 
vaded the  Cis-Sutlej  territory,  Sardar  Sham  Singh  disapproved  of  the  war,  but 
being  reproached  with  his  inaction  he  joined  the  camp,  and  fell  in  battle  in 
01846.  His  sons  were  Sardar  Thakur  Singh  and  Sardar  Kanh  Singh,  and 
after  the  annexation  much  of  the  family  estate  was  confirmed  to  the  latter. 
He  died  without  issue  in  1872,  and  his  estates  were  allowed  to  devolve  on 
Sardar  Ajit  Singh,  son  of  Sardar  Thakur  Singh,  and  a  younger  brother  of  the 
Sardar  Jiwan  Singh.  The  latter  is  the  eldest  son  of  the  late  Sardar  Thakur 
Singh.  He  has  two  sons,  named  Partab  Singh  and  Changa  Singh. 
Residence. — Ata"ri,  Amritsar,  Punjab. 


JIWAN  SINGH,  THAKUR  (of  Jakhnoda),  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890. 
Residence — Alira"jpur,  Central  India. 

\ 
JOi3AT,  RANA  SARUP  SINGH,  Rand  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1866  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1874  as  a  minor.  Belongs  to  the 
Rahtor  tribe  of  Rajputs  (Hindu) ;  occupies  a  fort  picturesquely  situated  on 
the  summit  of  a  steep  rocky  hill,  shut  in  on  three  sides  by  forest-clad  moun- 
tains, and  overlooking  the  town  of  Jobat.  The  area  of  the  State  is  132 
square  miles;  its  population  9387,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  3916 
belonging  to  Bhii  and  other  aboriginal  tribes.  The  Rana  maintains  a  mili- 
tary force  of  5  cavalry  and  44  infantry. 

Residence. — Jobat,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 

JODH  SINGH  (of  Chapa),  Sardar. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

JODHA  SINHA  (of  Kakhauta),  Rao. 

Born  1838.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Rao  belongs  to  an  old  Sengar 
family,  who  settled  in  Pargand  Auraiya  in  Etawah.  He  has  a  son  and  heir, 
named  Lala  Guman  Singh,  born  27th  February  1870. 

Residence. — Kakhauta,  Eta"wah,  North- Western  Provinces. 


218 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JODHPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SIR  JASWANT  SINGH 
BAHADUR,  G.C.S.I.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1837;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i3th  February  1873.     ^s  tne  Chief 
of  the  great  Rahtor  tribe  or  clan  of  the  Rajputs,  claiming  direct  descent 

from  the  legendary  hero  Rama,  and,  like 
the  Sesodias  of  Udaipur  and  the  Kachhwahas 
of  Jaipur,  representing  the  royal  line  of  the 
Surya  Vansa  or  Solar  race.  His  full  titles 
are — His  Highness  Raj  Rajeshwar  Maharaj- 
Adhiraj  Sir  Jaswant  Singh,  Bahadur,  Knight 
Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order 
of  the  Star  of  India.  The  proper  name  of 
the  State,  the  capital  of  which  is  Jodhpur 
(from  the  name  of  its  founder),  is  Marwar 
— anciently  Marusthdn,  "the  land  of  death," 
a  term  applied  formerly  not  only  to  the 
country  of  Marwar,  but  to  the  whole  of  the 
Great  Indian  Desert  from  the  Sutlej  to  the 
Indian  Ocean.  Tod,  in  his  learned  Annals 
of  Rdjdsthdn,  says  of  the  family  of  the 
Jodhpur  Maharaja — "It  requires  neither  Bhat  nor  Bard  to  illustrate  its 
nobility;  a  series  of  splendid  deeds  which  time  cannot  obliterate  has 
emblazoned  the  Rahtor  name  on  the  historical  tablet.  Where  all  these 
races  have  gained  a  place  in  the  Temple  of  Fame  it  is  almost  invidious 
to  select,  but  truth  compels  me  to  place  the  Rahtor  with  the  Chauhan 
on  the  very  pinnacle."  In  Tod's  work  the  Annals  of  Mdrwdr  occupy  a 
place  only  second  to  those  of  Mewar  (or  Udaipur),  and  present  a  most  in- 
teresting view  of  feudalism  in  India.  Even  to  the  present  day  the  feudal 
Thakurs  of  Rajputana — feudatories  of  their  Highnesses  the  Maharana  of 
Udaipur,  the  Maharajas  of  Jodhpur  and  Jaipur,  and  the  other  Princes  of  this 
territory  —  are  nobles  of  high  account  and  great  local  power.  Up  to 
1194  A.D.  the  Rahtor  family  were  rulers  of  the  vast  Empire  of  Kanauj.  The 
famous  Jai  Chand  was  the  last  King  of  Kanauj,  and  his  grandson,  Sivaji, 
migrated  westward  to  Marwar.  Scions  of  the  family  became  rulers  of  Bikanir 
and  Kishangarh  in  Rajputana,  of  Idar  and  Ahmadnagar  in  Gujarat,  and  else- 
where. Mandor,  the  ancient  capital  of  Marwar,  was  conquered  by  Rao 
Chanda,  who  was  tenth  in  descent  from  Sivaji,  about  the  year  1382  A.D. 
His  grandson  Jodh,  the  eldest  of  twenty-four  sons  of  Rinmal,  moved  the 
capital  from  Mandor  to  Jodhpur  in  1459  A.D.  After  resisting  the  Emperor 
Babar  and  the  Afghan  Sher  Shah,  Jodh  ultimately  had  to  submit  to  the 
Great  Mughal,  Akbar,  and  sent  his  son  Udai  Singh  to  take  service  at  Delhi ; 
and  ultimately  Udai  Singh's  sister,  the  famous  Jodh  Bai,  became  the  consort 
of  the  Mughal  monarch.  When  Udai  Singh's  son,  Raja  Sur  Singh,  succeeded 
to  the  gadi  of  Jodhpur,  he  rose  to  high  favour  with  his  Imperial  uncle,  and 
was  the  general  of  Akbar's  troops  who  added  Gujarat  and  the  Deccan  to  the 
Mughal  Empire.  His  son,  Raja  Jaswant  Singh,  was  the  general  whom  the 
Emperor  Shah  Jahan  sent  against  his  rebellious  son  Aurangzeb,  and  was 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  219 

defeated  by  the  latter.  The  successor  of  Jaswant  Singh  was  a  posthumous 
son,  the  famous  Ajit  Singh.  In  his  time  Aurangzeb  in  person  attacked 
Rajputana,  sacked  Jodhpur,  and  ordered  the  conversion  of  the  Rajputs  to 
Muhammadanism.  But  Ajit  Singh  formed  a  league  with  Udaipur  and 
Jaipur,  and  the  combined  forces  of  the  three  great  Rajput  States  held  in 
check  the  armies  of  Aurangzeb.  One  stipulation  of  this  league  is  famous, 
and  was  disastrous  to  Jodhpur  and  Jaipur  by  reason  of  the  domestic  feuds  it 
caused.  It  was  to  the  effect  that  the  Jodhpur  and  Jaipur  families,  who  had 
lost  the  privilege  of  marrying  Princesses  of  Udaipur  because  they  had  given 
their  own  daughters  to  the  Mughal  Emperors,  should  recover  this  privilege, 
on  condition  that  the  issue  of  any  marriage  with  an  Udaipur  Princess  should 
succeed  to  the  Raj  before  all  other  children.  Ajit  Singh  was  murdered  by 
his  son  Bakht  Singh,  and  heavy  troubles  thereafter  befell  the  Rahtor  family. 
There  was  a  long  war  between  the  Rajas  of  Jaipur  and  Jodhpur,  who  were 
rival  suitors  for  the  hand  of  a  Princess  of  Udaipur.  Amir  Khan,  the  great 
Pindari  leader  (afterwards  Nawab  of  Tonk),  took  sides,  first  with  Jaipur,  then 
with  Jodhpur,  and  plundered  and  utterly  exhausted  both  States  in  turn.  At 
last  the  British  Government  intervened,  and  by  a  treaty  in  1818  Jodhpur 
became  a  feudatory  of  the  Paramount  Power.  Raja  Man  Singh  died  in 
1843,  leaving  no  son,  and  the  nobles  and  Court  officials,  with  the  consent  of 
the  British  Government,  elected  Takht  Singh,  Raja  of  Ahmadnagar,  a 
descendant  of  Ajit  Singh,  to  the  vacant  gadi.  The  Raja  Takht  Singh  did 
good  service  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  He  died  in  1873,  and  was  suc- 
ceeded by  the  present  Maharaja.  His  Highness  has  been  created  a  Grand 
Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  The  area  of 
his  State  is  37,000  square  miles  ;  its  population  is  1,750,403,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  about  155,000  Muhammadans  and  about  172,000  Jains.  In 
point  of  extent  the  Jodhpur  State  is  larger  than  any  of  the  smaller  European 
States,  and  is  somewhat  larger  than  Bavaria  and  Saxony  combined ;  in  popu- 
lation it  surpasses  the  Grand  Duchy  of  Baden.  The  Maharaja  maintains  a 
military  force  of  3162  cavalry,  3653  infantry,  and  121  guns;  and  is  entitled 
to  a  salute  of  2 1  guns  (including  4  guns  personal).  The  family  cognisance 
is  the  falcon,  the  sacred  garur  of  the  Solar  Rajputs.  The  arms  of  His 
Highness,  as  displayed  on  the  banner  presented  to  him  by  the  Empress  of 
India  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi  in  January  1877,  on  the  occasion 
of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress,  are  shown 
in  the  margin. 

Residence. — Jodhpur,  Ra"jputa"na. 


220  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JOGESH  CHANDRA  CHATTARJI  (of  Anuliya,  RdndgMt), 

Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 

Residence.  — Assam. 


JOG-INDRA  NATH  RAI  (of  Ndtor),  Kumdr. 

The  title  is  personal.     The  Kumar  is  the  son  of  the  late  Raja  Anan- 
danath  Rai  Bahadur,  C.S.I. 

Residence. — Ra"jshdhi,  Bengal. 


JOTINDRA  MOHAN  TAGOR,  SIR,  K.C.S.I.,  Maharaja  Bahadur. 

See  Tagore. 


JUBBAL,  RANA  PADAM  CHAND,  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 86 1  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  iyth  March  1877. 
Belongs  to  a  Rahtor  Rajput  family  (see  Jodhpur),  claiming  descent  from  the 
ruling  family  of  Sirmur,  which  preceded  the  present  dynasty.  Originally 
tributary  to  Sirmur,  this  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  was 
freed  by  the  British  after  the  conclusion  of  the  Gurkha  war,  and  the  Rana, 
Puran  Singh,  received  a  sanad  from  Lord  Lake  in  1815.  After  great  vicissi- 
tudes of  fortune,  Puran  Singh  (who  had  given  up  his  State  to  the  British 
Government)  died  in  1849,  and  it  was  then  resolved  to  restore  the  State  to 
his  son,  Rana  Karm  Chand.  The  latter  died  in  1877,  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son,  the  present  Rana.  The  area  of  the  State  is  257  square  miles; 
its  population  is  19,196,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a  military 
force  of  50  infantry. 

Residence. — Jubbal,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


JUMKHA,  BECHARBHA  BARYAL,   Chief  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1836.     Belongs  to  an  aboriginal  tribe. 
Residence. — Jumkha,  Rewa"  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

JUMMOO  AND  CASHMERE, 
His  Highness  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  of.     See  Jammu  and  Kashmir. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


JUNAGARH,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SIR  BAHADUR  KHANJI 
MUHABAT  KHANJI,  G.C.I.E.,  Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1856  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  29th  September  1882.  Belongs  to  a 
Babi  Pathan  (Muhammadan)  family.  Is  ninth  in  succession  from  Sher  Khan 
Babi,  the  founder  of  the  State,  who  about  the  year  1735  expelled  the  Mughal 
Governor  and  established  his  own  power.  The  late  Nawab,  Sir  Muhabat 
Khanji,  was  created  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the 
Star  of  India  in  1871.  He  died  in  1882,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
the  present  Nawab,  who  was  invested  with  the  insignia  of  a  Knight  Grand 
Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  on  2oth 
November  1890.  The  area  of  the  State  is  3279  square  miles;  and  its 
population  is  387,499,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  76,401  Muhammadans. 
His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  251  cavalry,  1972  infantry,  and 
66  guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Juna"garh,  Ka"thidwdr,  Bombay. 

JWALA  PERSHAD,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  7th  January  1876. 
Residence. — Ujjain,  Central  India. 

JWALA  SINGH  (of  Jharauli),  Sarddr. 

Born  1846.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Sindhu  Jat  (Rajput) 
family,  descended  from  Dip  Singh,  the  Mahant  of  the  "  Damdama  Saheb," 
or  resting-place  of  the  Guru  Govind  Singh  (see  Jiwan  Singh,  Shahid,  Sardar). 
His  successor,  Sudha  Singh,  falling  in  battle  with  the  Governor  of  Jalandhar, 
the  family  have  since  been  known  by  the  name  of  Shahid  ("Martyr"). 
Sardar  Jwala  Singh,  son  of  Sardar  Jit  Singh  of  Jharauli,  is  the  present  head 
of  the  Jharauli  Shahids.  He  has  two  sons — Devindar  Singh  and  Mohindar 
Singh. 

Residence. — Jharauli,  Ambala,  Punjab. 

JWALA  SINGH  (of  Wazirabad),  Sarddr. 

Born  1822.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  is  the  youngest  son  ot 
the  Sardar  Ganda  Singh,  who  was  in  attendance  on  the  Maharaja  Sher  Singh 
when  that  prince  was  assassinated,  and  was  severely  wounded  in  the 
endeavour  to  defend  him.  Sardar  Ganda  Singh  was  killed  at  the  battle  of 
Firuzshahr.  Sardar  Jwala  Singh  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Gujrdnwcila,  Punjab. 


JYOTI  PRASAD  GARGA  (of  Maisadal),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   ist  January  1890,  for  his 
"  liberality  and  public  spirit."     The  Raja  is  the  present  representative  of 


222  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

the  Maisadal  family.  Their  title  of  Raja  is  said  to  have  been  conferred  by 
the  old  Nawabs  of  Bengal.  The  first  Raja  was  the  Raja  Janardhan  Upad- 
hyaya.  Two  ladies  of  this  family  at  different  periods — the  Rani  Janaki  Devi 
and  the  Rani  Mathura  Devi — have  been  in  charge  of  the  Raj.  The  late 
Raja,  Lakshman  Prasad  Garga  of  Maisadal,  is  recorded  to  have  rendered 
good  service  during  the  Orissa  famine  of  1866. 
Residence. — -Maisadal,  Midnapur,  Bengal. 


KABIL  SHAH,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Thar  and  Parkar,  Sind. 

KACHI  BARODA,  THAKUR  DALBL  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1839;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  1864.      The  State  is  tributary  to 
Dhar,  to  which  it  is  adjacent,  and  contains  a  population  of  about  3000. 
Residence. — Kachi  Baroda,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 

KADATTANAD,  MANA  VARMA  RAJA,  Valiya  Rdjd  of. 

Born  1820.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  present  Raja  being  the  twenty- 
sixth  in  descent.  Belongs  to  a  Samanda  family,  which  originally  held  the 
rule  over  a  district  named  Vatakumpuram.  One  of  his  ancestors  was  driven 
out  of  Vatakumpuram  by  the  Zamorin  of  Calicut,  and  thenceforward  the 
family  ruled  a  district  on  the  Malabar  coast,  extending  originally  from  Mahe 
to  Badagara,  where  the  Raja  now  lives.  This  territory  is  said  to  have 
been  granted  by  the  Cherakal  Raja  of  Kolathiri.  In  1766  Haidar  AH  of 
Mysore  invaded  the  country,  and  the  Raja  took  refuge  with  the  East  India 
Company's  officers  in  Tellicheri ;  and  again,  when  the  Sultan  Tippu  invaded 
the  country,  the  Raja  and  his  family  took  refuge  with  the  Maharaja  of 
Travancore.  In  1792  the  Raja  entered  into  an  agreement  with  the  British 
Government  to  receive  an  annuity  as  compensation  for  the  estates  of  his 
ancestors.  Like  the  other  Malabar  Rajas,  the  family  follows  the  Marumak- 
katayam  law  of  inheritance,  by  which  the  succession  is  with  the  offspring  of 
its  female  members,  the  next  eldest  male  to  the  Raja  being  always  his  heir. 
The  late  Raja  Udaya  Varma  was  born  in  181 1,  and  succeeded  to  the  title  on 
23rd  June  1858.  He  died  recently,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  heir  under 
the  Marumakkatayam  law,  the  present  Raja. 

Residence. — Badagara,  Malabar  District,  Madras. 

KADIR  BAKHSH,  MUNSHI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  223 


KADIR  HUSAIN,  Khan. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the 
Carnatic,  and  recognised  in  1891. 
Residence. — Madras. 


KADIR  HUSAIN,  Khan  Bahadur  Ausif  Jang  Itimad-ud-daula. 

The  titles  are  personal,  and  were  conferred  originally  by  the  Nawab  of 
the  Carnatic,  and  recognised  on  i6th  December  1890. 
Residence. — M  adras. 

KADIR  MOHI-UD-DIN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  it  was  conferred  originally  by  the  Nawab  of  the 
Carnatic,  arid  recognised  on  i6th  December  1890. 
Residence. — M  adras. 


KADIRDAD  KHAN  GUL  KHAN,  C.I.E.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  is  a  Deputy  Collector  in  Sind ;  and  for  his  services  to 
the  State  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Sind. 


KAHLUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  RAJA  BIJE  CHAND,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1872;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  3rd  February  1889. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  Argok,  a  Raja 
whose  territory  was  situated  in  the  Deccan.  Harihar  Chand,  a  descendant 
of  Argok  in  the  fourteenth  generation,  came  on  a  pilgrimage  to  Jwalamukhi, 
a  sacred  place  in  the  Kangra  district  of  the  Punjab ;  he  saw  Jhandbhari,  in 
the  Hoshiarpur  district,  and,  attracted  by  the  place,  conquered  it  and  settled 
down  there.  One  of  Harihar  Chand's  sons  conquered  and  took  possession 
of  the  Chamba  State  (q.v.) ;  another  carved  out  a  principality  for  himself  in 
Kanidon;  while  a  third  son,  Bir  Chand,  founded  the  State  of  Kahlur  or 
Bilaspur.  From  1803  to  1815  the  State  was  overrun  by  the  Gurkhas,  and 
after  their  expulsion  it  was  confirmed  to  the  then  Raja  by  a  sanad  from  the 
British  Government,  dated  6th  March  1815.  The  Raja  Hira  Singh,  pre- 
decessor of  the  present  Raja,  rendered  good  service  during  the  Mutiny  of 
1857,  and  was  rewarded  with  a  salute  of  n  guns.  The  area  of  the  State 
(which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  is  448  square  miles ;  its  population  is 
86,546,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  40  cavalry, 
620  infantry,  and  n  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  n  guns. 

Residence. — Kahlur,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


224  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KAHN.     See  Kanh. 

KAILASH  CHANDAR  MUKHARJI,  Red  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1887,  for  "long 
and  meritorious  service  in  the  Bengal  Secretariat." 
Residence. — 20  Durjipara  Street,  Calcutta,  Bengal. 

KAISAR  MIRZA,  Nawdb  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Nawab  Bahadur  being  the  grandson  of  a 
daughter  of  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh.  He  is  the  son  of 
the  Nawab  Abul  Hasan  Khan. 

Residence. — O  udh. 

KAKARKHERI  (BHOPAL),  Thdkur  of.     See  Dhabla  Dhir. 

KAKKU  MAL,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Born  28th  February  1849.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on 
1 6th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Belongs  to  a  family  that  migrated  from  the  Punjab  in  1751,  and  settled  at 
Ajudhya.  His  father  was  Treasurer  under  the  Kings  of  Oudh,  and  was 
subsequently  appointed  Peshkar  by  the  British  Government.  He  has  rendered 
loyal  and  meritorious  service  as  Chairman  of  the  Fyzabad  Municipal  Board. 

Residence. — Fyzabad,  Oudh. 

KALAHANDI,  Rdjd  of.     See  Karond. 

KALAHASTI,  KUMARA  MADDU  VENKATAPPA,  Rdjd  oj. 

Born  1850;  succeeded  recently  to  the  gadi  on  the  death  of  his  father, 
the  Raja  Damarakumara  Maddu  Venkatappa  Nayudu  Bahadur  Garu,  C.S.I. 
Belongs  to  an  ancient  family,  that  acquired  importance  in  the  i5th  century 
under  the  Government  of  the  Rajas  of  Vijayanagar,  and  increased  in  con- 
sequence of  the  decline  of  that  dynasty.  Under  the  Muhammadan  Govern- 
ment the  head  of  the  family  held  the  position  of  a  Mansabddr  of  5000 
foot ;  and  a  sanad  granted  by  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb  of  Delhi  made  the 
family  directly  subordinate  to  the  Nawab  of  Arcot.  An  ancestor  of  the 
Raja  was  the  local  Naik  who  procured  for  the  English  from  the  Raja  of 
Chandragiri  the  privilege  of  settling  at  Madras  and  of  building  a  fort  there ; 
and  his  father's  name  being  Chenappa,  he  stipulated  that  the  place  should  be 
called  Chenappa-patnam.  The  late  Raja  received  the  Companionship  of  the 
Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India  from  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince 
of  Wales,  at  the  Darbar  held  at  Calcutta  on  ist  January  1876.  The  family 
banner  is  the  "  Hanumadwajam,"  or  flag  bearing  the  device  of  Hanuman 
(the  sacred  monkey)  in  five  colours.  The  Raja  owns  large  estates  in  Nellore 
and  North  Arcot  districts,  Madras. 

Residence. — Kalahasti,  Nellore,  Madras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  225 

KALAT,  HIS  HIGHNESS  BEGLAR  BEGI  MIR  SIR  MUHAM- 
MAD KHODADAD  KHAN,  G.C.S.I,  Walt  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1838;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1857.  The  title  of  Beglar  Begi 
was  conferred  on  one  of  His  Highness's  ancestors,  named  Nasir  Khan,  by 
the  great  Persian  invader  Nadir  Shah  in  1739.  Nasir  Khan  subsequently 
was  embroiled  in  wars  with  the  King  of  Kabul,  Ahmad  Shah  Abdali,  and 
later  on  became  a  trusted  leader  of  that  monarch's  troops.  Nasir  Khan 
died  in  extreme  old  age  in  1795,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Mahmud 
Khan.  In  1839,  at  the  time  of  the  first  Afghan  war,  Mehrab  Khan  was 
the  Wali  of  Kalat  and  ruler  of  Baluchistan;  on  account  of  his  supposed 
treachery  (which  was  afterwards  discovered  to  have  been  falsely  attributed  to 
him  by  his  Wazir\  the  town  and  fort  of  Kalat  were  stormed  by  General 
Willshire,  and  the  unfortunate  Mehrab  Khan  was  among  the  slain.  In  1841, 
however,  his  son  Nasir  Khan  was  reinstated  by  the  British,  whose  army 
thereon  evacuated  the  country;  and  in  1854  a  treaty  was  concluded, 
stipulating  for  the  protection  of  the  State  by  the  British  Power.  Nasir  Khan 
died  in  1856,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother,  the  present  Wali.  His 
Highness  had  an  interview  with  the  Viceroy  of  India  (Lord  Lytton)  in  1876 
at  Jacobabad,  when  the  treaty  of  1854  was  renewed  and  extended;  and, 
with  his  great  vassals,  he  attended  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  1877, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India, 
and  was  created  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of 
the  Star  of  India.  Throughout  the  Afghan  war  of  1878-79  the  Wali 
rendered  the  most  valuable  aid  to  the  Government — -placing  all  the  resources 
of  his  country  at  its  disposal,  and  sending  his  son  and  heir -apparent  to 
accompany  the  General  in  command  of  the  army  passing  through  his 
territory.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  91,000  square  miles;  its  popula- 
tion is  about  150,000,  chiefly  Muhammadans.  His  Highness  maintains  a 
military  force  of  300  cavalry,  1500  infantry,  and  6  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  2 1  guns  (including  2  guns  personal). 

Residence. — Kalcit,  Baluchistan. 

KALB  ALI  KHAN,  MIRZA,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

Born  22nd  June  1828.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th 
May  1889,  for  his  "  distinguished  loyalty  in  the  Mutiny  and  his  good  services." 
The  Khan  Bahadur  was  formerly  Sub-Judge  of  Unao,  and  has  had  a  long  and 
distinguished  service  in  the  Judicial  Department. 

Residence. — Unao,  Oudh. 

KALE  KHAN,  MAJOR,  Khan  Bahddur. 

Governor  of  Gilgit.     Granted  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Gilgit,  Kashmir. 

KALI  BAORI,  BHUMIA  SHER  SINGH,  Bhumia  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1874.  The  Bhumia  receives 
allowances  both  from  Dhar  and  from  Gwalior,  on  condition  of  preserving 

Q 


226  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

order  in   certain    territory.      The  State   contains   about    1700   inhabitants, 
chiefly  Hindus.     The  Chief  belongs  to  a  Bhilala  family. 
Residence. — Ka"li  Ba"ori,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 

KALI  KISHAN  GHOSH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888,  in  recognition 
of  highly  meritorious  service  in  the  Army  Medical  Department,  in  which  the 
Rai  Bahadur  has  been  an  Assistant-Surgeon. 

Residence. — Na"gpur,  Central  Provinces. 

KALI  KUMAR  DB,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January 
1893,  for  eminent  services  in  the  Currency  Department. 
Residence. — Calcutta. 

KALI  PADA  MUKHARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Orissa,  Bengal. 

KALIKA  DAS  DATT,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  3rd  July  1841  ;  son  of  the  late  Rai  Golak  Nath  Datt.  Educated 
at  the  Krishnagar  and  Presidency  Colleges  of  the  Calcutta  University  (B.A., 
1860  ;  B.L.,  1861).  Appointed  to  the  Judicial  Service  in  1861,  and  became 
Diwan  of  the  State  of  Kuch  Behar  in  August  1869.  Was  formally  invested 
with  insignia  of  office  in  1870,  and  became  Member  of  the  Kuch  Behar  State 
Council.  Has  rendered  long  and  meritorious  service  as  Minister  of  the  Kuch 
Behar  State,  and  in  recognition  thereof  was  granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur 
on  ist  January  1891.  Has  three  sons — (i)  Charu  Chandra  Datt,  born  i6th 
June  1876  j  (2)  Atal  Chandra  Datt,  born  5th  June  1878  ;  (3)  Nirmal  Chandra 
Datt,  born  23rd  January  1881. 

Residences.  —  The  Dewa~nkha"na,  Kuch  Behar,  Bengal ;  Meral,  Burdwan, 
Bengal ;  and  4  Ganga"dhar  Babu's  Lane,  Calcutta. 

KALIYAN  SINGH  (of  Jhawaro)  Rao. 

Born  1863.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by 
the  old  Mahratta  Government  of  Deori,  and  subsequently  recognised  by  the 
British  Government. 

Residence. — Jhawaro,  Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

KALIYAN  SINGH,  THAKUR,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  of  Rao  Saheb  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January 
1877. 

Residence. — Junian,  Ajmir. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  227 


KALIYANA  SUNDAEAM  CHETTIYAR,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  1837.     The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Was  appointed  a  Deputy-Collector  in  1878. 
Residence. — Cuddalore,  Madras. 

KALSIA,  SARDAR  RANJIT  SINGH,  Sarddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 88 1  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  28th  August  1886. 
Belongs  to  a  Jat  (Sikh)  family,  originally  of  Kalsia  in  the  Lahore  district, 
whose  founder,  Sardar  Gurbakhsh  Singh,  conquered  this  territory  in  the  last 
century.  His  son,  Jodh  Singh,  was  a  brave  and  able  man,  who  made  con- 
siderable conquests  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Ambala  towards  the  close  of  the 
century.  When  the  Cis-Sutlej  States  came  under  British  protection,  Sardar 
Jodh  Singh  followed  the  general  example.  His  grandson,  Sardar  Lahna 
Singh,  was  the  grandfather  of  the  present  Sardar.  The  area  of  the  State  is 
169  square  miles;  its  population  is  67,708,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including 
19,930  Muhammadans  and  5923  Sikhs.  The  Sardar  maintains  a  military 
force  of  48  cavalry,  181  infantry,  and  3  guns. 

Residence. — Kalsia,  Punjab. 


KALU  KHAN  (of  Kuldchi),  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  nth  March  1859.  The  Khan  Bahadur 
belongs  to  the  family  of  the  Chief  of  the  Gandapur  clan  of  the  Kulachi 
country  in  the  Dera  Ismail  Khan  district  of  the  Punjab,  and  belongs  to  the 
Bira  Khel  (Afghan)  tribe.  In  the  Multan  campaign  of  1848-49  Kalu  Khan 
and  his  father  AH  Khan  raised  a  force  of  several  hundred  men  of  the  Bira 
Khel  tribe  of  Afghans,  and  rendered  excellent  service  throughout  the  second 
Sikh  war,  for  which  Kalu  Khan  received  a  large  pension  from  Government. 
When  the  Mutiny  of  1857  broke  out,  he  immediately  raised  a  force  of  200 
horse  and  400  foot,  and  leaving  200  foot  with  the  Deputy-Commissioner  of 
Dera  Ismail  Khan  for  the  posts  on  the  Sulaimani  border,  he  joined  Sir 
Herbert  Edwardes  with  the  remaining  200  horse  and  200  foot  at  Peshawar, 
where  he  served  throughout  the  crisis  with  distinguished  loyalty.  For  this 
he  received  a  valuable  khilat^  a  perpetual  jdgir,  and  the  title  of  Khan 
Bahadur. 

Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Khdn,  Punjab. 


KALU  KHERA,  RAO  UMED  SINGH,  Rao  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1830  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  1843.  The  Rao  belongs  to  a  Rajput 
family,  and  his  title  is  hereditary.  The  State  contains  a  population  of  about 
1000. 

Residence. — Kalu  Khera,  Western  Mdlwa",  Central  India. 


228  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

KAMADHIA,  MIR  ZULFIKAR  ALI,   Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Belongs  to  a  Muhammadan  family  in  the  Gohelwar  Prant,  Kathiawar. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  4  square  miles;  its  population  about  772,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Kamadhia,  Kathidwar,  Bombay. 

KAMALPUR,  THAKUR  MADAN  SINGH,   Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  nth  October  1881.  Receives  an 
allowance,  in  lieu  of  land  rights,  from  Gwalior.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu) 
family. 

Residence. — Kamalpur,  Bhopal,  Central  India. 

KAMATA  PATI  GHOSAL,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889,  for  dis- 
tinguished service  in  the  Bengal  Police. 

Residence. — Naihdti,  Bengal. 

KAMBAKHSH  HASAN  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  Prince  is  the  tenth  son  of  the  late  Wajid  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh, 
and  bears  the  title  of  Prince  as  a  personal  or  courtesy  title. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

KAMR  KADR  MIRZA.     See  Abid  Ali  Bahadur. 

KAMRAN  SHAH,  Rdjd. 

Born  1840.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by 
the  ancient  Gond  Rajas  of  Deogarh  and  Nagpur,  and  subsequently  recognised 
by  the  British  Government.  Belongs  to  a  family  of  Gond  (aboriginal)  origin, 
that  is,  a  younger  branch  of  the  family  of  Raja  Sulaiman  Shah  of  Deogarh 
and  Nagpur.  The  family  became  Muhammadan  about  200  years  ago.  In 
1860  the  British  Government  confirmed  his  jdgirs  in  perpetuity  to  Raja 
Kamran  Shah,  in  consideration  both  of  his  own  loyal  services  during  the 
Mutiny,  and  of  his  father's  good  services  previously  rendered.  The  Raja  is 
an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and  Member  of  the  local  Municipal  and  School 
Committees.  He  has  two  sons,  named  Kuar  Omri  Shah  and  Kuar  Sultan 
Shah. 

Residence. — Ramangan,  Hoshangabad,  Central  Provinces. 

KAMR-UD-DIN,   FAKIR,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her^Majesty's  reign. 

Residence. — Lahore,  Punj ab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  229 


KAMTA  RAJAULA,  BAG  BHARAT  PARSHAD,  Jagirdar  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 8th  July  1847;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  October  1874. 
Belongs  to  a  Kayastha  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Sardar  Ajudhya 
Parshad,  an  agent  of  the  State  of  Charkhari  (q.v.\  who  became  an  agent  of  the 
Kalinjar  Chaubes,  and  obtained  from  them  the  jdgir  of  Kamta.  His  son, 
Rao  Gopal  Lai,  received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government,  and,  dying  in 
1874,  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Jagirdar.  The  area  of  the  State  is  4 
square  miles;  its  population  is  about  1500,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Jagirdar 
maintains  a  military  force  of  1 5  infantry  and  i  gun.  He  has  sons,  of  whom 
the  eldest  is  named  Bhaya  Ram  Parshad. 

Residence. — Kamta  Rajaula,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

KANGSEU,  Myoza  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  Chief  rules  over  one  of  the  Shan  States,  on  the  frontiers  of  Burma. 
Residence. — Kangseu,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KANH  CHAND,  Rat  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Kdngra,  Punjab. 

KANHAI  LAL  DB,  C.I.B.,  Rat  Bahadur. 

Born  24th  September  1831.  The  title  of  Rai  Bahadur  is  personal,  and 
was  conferred  on  6th  June  1872,  for  distinguished  medical  services.  The 
Rai  Bahadur  is  a  son  of  the  late  Radha  Nath  De,  Rai  Bahadur,  and  the 
name  is  very  commonly  spelt  "  Kanny  Lall  Dey."  He  was  educated  at  the 
Medical  College  of  Bengal,  where  he  graduated  with  distinction  in  1854,  and 
in  the  same  year  was  appointed  to  a  Professorship  of  Chemistry  in  the  Cal- 
cutta Medical  College,  and  a  Chemical  Examiner  to  Government.  In  1862 
he  was  appointed  Professor  of  Chemistry  in  the  Presidency  College  of  the 
University  of  Calcutta,  and  from  that  time  his  honours — professional,  scien- 
tific, and  other — have  been  exceedingly  numerous.  He  was  appointed  suc- 
cessively Member  British  Medical  Association,  1863;  Honorary  Member, 
Pharmaceutical  Society  of  Great  Britain,  1863;  additional  Chemical  Ex- 
'aminer  to  Government,  1867-72  ;  teacher  of  Chemistry  and  Medical  Juris- 
prudence to  the  Vernacular  Classes,  Calcutta  Medical  College,  1869-84; 
Fellow  of  the  University  of  Calcutta,  1870;  Member  Faculty  of  Medicine, 
University  of  Calcutta,  1871;  Rai  Bahadur,  1872;  Justice  of  the  Peace, 
1872;  Member  Committee  of  the  Economic  Museum,  1874;  Professor  of 
Chemistry  and  Government  Chemical  Examiner,  Calcutta  Medical  College, 
1877-78;  Municipal  Commissioner,  1877-85;  Member  Central  Committee 
for  the  Selection  of  the  Vernacular  Text-Books,  1887  ;  Certificate  of  Honour 
in  recognition  of  services  to  the  State  on  the  occasion  of  Her  Majesty's 
assumption  of  the  Imperial  title,  1877  ;  Examiner  in  Medical  Jurisprudence, 


230  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

1878;  Fellow  Chemical  Society,  London  (F.C.S.),  1880;  Vice-President  of 
the  Calcutta  Medical  Society,  1881  ;  Presidency  Magistrate  for  Calcutta, 
1 88 1  ;  Member  of  Committee  and  Juror  at  the  Calcutta  Exhibition  of  Indian 
Art  Manufactures,  1881-82;  Juror  at  the  Jaipur  Exhibition,  1883,  also  Cal- 
cutta International  Exhibition,  1883-84;  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  1884;  appointed  Member  of  the 
Syndicate,  Calcutta  University,  1886;  Member  District  Charitable  Society, 
Calcutta,  1886;  Honorary  Fellow  College  of  Physicians,  Philadelphia,  1886. 
The  Rai  Bahadur  is  the  author  of  treatises  on  chemistry,  physics,  and 
medical  jurisprudence  in  Bengali.  He  has  helped  to  develop  the  drug 
resources  of  India,  and  written  an  elaborate  descriptive  catalogue  of  same. 
He  represented  India  at  the  International  Exhibition,  London,  1862  ;  Uni- 
versal Exposition  of  Paris,  1867  and  1878;  Vienna  Universal  Exhibition, 
1872;  Melbourne  Exhibition,  1880;  Amsterdam  Exhibition,  1883;  World's 
Industrial  Cotton  Centennial  Exposition,  New  Orleans,  U.S.A.,  1884-85; 
and  Colonial  and  Indian  Exhibition,  1886,  for  which  received  certificates 
and  medals,  also  thanks  of  the  Government.  The  Rai  Bahadur  has  a 
son,  named  Priyalal  De  (the  name  is  very  frequently  spelt  Preo  Lall  Dey), 
born  24th  July  1855  ;  a  Fellow  of  the  Chemical  Society  of  London  (F.C.S.), 
1886  ;  Presidency  Magistrate  for  Calcutta,  1890. 

Residences. — 1 1  Beadon  Street  and  62  Aheritola  Street,  Calcutta,  Bengal. 


KANHAI  LAL  JHA,  PANDIT,  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890  for 
eminence  in  Oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  imme- 
diately after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Darbhanga,  Bengal. 

KANHAYA  LAL,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  March  1876. 
Residence. — Lahore,  Punjab. 

KANHAYA  LAL,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Amritsar,  Punjab. 

KANKBR,  MAHARAJ-ADHIRAJ  NARHAR  DEO,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 3th  May  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  5th  December 
1853.  Belongs  to  a  very  ancient  Rajput  family,  whose  ancestors,  according 
to  tradition,  were  raised  to  the  gadi  by  a  popular  vote  in  very  early  times. 
During  the  dominion  of  the  Haihai  Vansi  dynasty  in  Chhattisgarh  the 
Kanker  Zamindars  were  rich  and  prosperous.  The  area  of  the  State  is  639 
square  miles;  its  population  is  63,610,  chiefly  Gonds  (aboriginal  tribe). 

Residence. — Kanker,  Raipur,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  231 

KANNAYYA  CHBTTI,  K.V.,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  1857.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888 
for  eminent  services  to  the  State.  Was  elected  a  member  of  the  Madras 
Municipal  Commission  in  1885. 

Residence. — Madras. 

KANNY  LALL  DEY,  C.I.B.,  Rai  Bahadur.     .Sk.Kanhai  Lai  De. 

KANTARAWADI,  SAWLAWI,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  the  chief  of  one  of  the  Karen  States  in  Eastern  Karenni, 
Burma.     The  population  consists  chiefly  of  Karens. 
Residence. — Kantarawadi,  Eastern  Karenni,  Burma. 

KANTI  CHANDAR  MUKHARJT,  C.I.B.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  The 
Rai  Bahadur  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire  on  ist  January  1891,  for  distinguished  services  as  Diwan  or 
Prime  Minister  of  the  State  of  Jaipur  in  Rajputana. 

Residence. — Jaipur,  Rajputdna. 

KANTIGYI,   Chief  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  Chief  rules  over  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  frontier  of  Burma. 
Its  population  consists  almost  entirely  of  Shans. 
Residence. — Kantigyi,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KANTIT,  RAJA  BHUP  INDRA  BAHADUR  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 

Born  1863;  as  a  minor  succeeded  his  father,  Raja  Rajendra  Bahadur 
Singh,  in  the  year  of  his  birth.  Belongs  to  an  ancient  family  of  Gaharwar 
Rajputs,  said  to  be  a  branch  of  that  of  the  Rahtors  of  Kanauj,  and  descended 
from  Gudan  Deo.  In  ancient  times,  for  a  long  series  of  years  it  appears 
that  there  was  a  Gaharwar  Raj  of  the  Kantit  family,  settled  at  Benares,  and 
owning  domains  in  Mirzapur  district,  south  of  the  Ganges.  In  1758  the 
Raja  Vikramaditya  Singh  of  Kantit  was  driven  out  by  Balwant  Singh,  the 
first  Raja  of  Benares  (g.v.);  but  after  the  flight  of  Raja  Chet  Singh  of 
Benares  in  1781,  Raja  Govinda  Singh,  son  of  Raja  Vikramaditya,  recovered 
his  possessions.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  nephew  and  adopted  son,  Ram 
Ghulam  Singh,  whose  son  was  Raja  Mahipal  Singh ;  and  the  latter  in  turn 
was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Jagat  Bahadur  Singh.  He  died  in  1850,  leaving 
two  minor  sons,  of  whom  the  elder,  Raja  Rajendra  Bahadur  Singh, 
succeeded  his  father,  but  hardly  lived  to  attain  his  majority.  On  his  death 
he  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Raja. 

Residence. — Bijaipur,  Mirzapur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


232  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KAPILAS  KUMARI  (of  Phulghar),  Rani. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Rani  belongs  to  a  very  ancient  Gond 
family,  descended  from  the  Chanda  stock  of  Gond  Rajas,  800  years  ago.  It 
is  said  that  the  title  of  Raja  was  conferred  on  an  ancestor  by  one  of  the 
ancient  Kings  of  Delhi,  before  the  family  left  Chanda.  Until  recently  the 
Phulghar  Zamindari  was  classed  as  a  Gurjhat  feudatory  State ;  but  the  late 
Raja  Jagsai  died  without  legitimate  heirs  in  1867,  and  the  State  lapsed  into 
the  form  of  a  Zamindari,  in  the  hands  of  the  late  Rani  Sagan  Kumari  of 
Phulghar,  who  was  the  lawful  wife  of  the  Raja  Prithi  Singh.  The  Rani 
Sagan  Kumari  was  more  than  seventy  years  of  age  when  she  succeeded  to  the 
estate,  as  she  was  born  before  the  commencement  of  the  present  century  ;  she 
was  succeeded  by  the  present  Rani. 

Residence. — Phulghar,  Sambalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  233 

KAPURTHALA,  His  Highness  the  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  September  1872  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  5th 
September  1877.  The  Raja's  full  title  is — His  Highness  Farzand-i-Dilband 
Rasikhul-Iti-kad  Daulat-i-Inglishia  Raja-i-Rajagan  Raja  Jagatjit  Singh 
Bahadur.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  Kalal  (Sikh)  family,  well  known  under  the 
distinguished  name  of  Ahluwalia,  from  the  village  of  Ahlu  near  Lahore. 
The  Sardar  Jassa  Singh  was  one  of  the  most  conspicuous  of  the  leaders  who 
consolidated  the  Sikh  Power  during  the  disorders  and  weakness  of  the 
Mughals,  consequent  on  the  invasions  of  Nadir  Shah  and  Ahmad  Shah 
Durani.  He  died  without  issue,  and  was  succeeded  by  Sardar  Bagh  Singh, 
a  descendant  of  his  uncle.  The  Chiefs  of  Kapurthala  largely  extended  their 
territories  and  power;  and  the  name  of  Sardar  Bagh  Singh's  successor, 
Sardar  Fateh  Singh,  was  associated  with  that  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh 
in  the  first  Sikh  treaty  concluded  with  the  British  Government.  In  1826 
Sardar  Fateh  Singh  sought  the  protection  of  the  British  Power  against  Ranjit 
Singh ;  but  in  the  first  Sikh  war  his  troops  fought  against  the  British  at  the 
battle  of  Aliwal,  and  on  this  account  his  Cis-Sutlej  territories  were  confiscated. 
In  the  second  Sikh  war  his  son  Sardar  Nihal  Singh  rendered  good  service ; 
and  in  recognition  of  it  he  was  created  a  Raja  in  1849.  On  the  outbreak 
of  the  Mutiny  in  1857,  the  Raja  Sir  Randhir  Singh,  G. C.S.I.,  of  Kapurthala, 
volunteered  the  services  of  himself  and  all  his  followers.  He  strengthened 
the  hold  of  Government  in  the  Jalandhar  Doab,  and  then  volunteered  to  aid 
in  the  subjugation  of  the  rebellious  Province  of  Oudh.  His  offer  was 
accepted ;  and  accompanied  by  his  brother,  the  brave  Sardar  Bikrama  Singh 
Bahadur,  C.S.I.,  he  marched  to  Oudh  at  the  head  of  2000  horse  and  foot 
and  four  guns.  This  force  fought  no  less  than  six  actions  with  the  rebels,  with 
conspicuous  valour  on  the  part  alike  of  the  Chief,  his  brother,  and  his 
followers.  They  held  most  important  positions — first  at  Bani  to  protect  the 
Lucknow  and  Cawnpur  road,  and  afterwards  at  Daryabad ;  and  captured  ten 
guns  from  the  rebels.  The  Kapurthala  troops  remained  in  Oudh  for  a 
whole  year ;  and  the  Raja  Sir  Randhir  Singh  received  as  a  reward  for  his 
loyalty  and  bravery  large  estates  there,  confiscated  from  the  rebellious  Rajas 
of  Bhitauli,  Baundi,  and  Ikauna,  as  well  as  a  khilat  of  Rs.  10,000,  and 
many  other  honours.  In  1870  he  set  out  to  visit  England,  but  unfortunately 
died  at  Aden  on  the  way.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  Raja  Kharak 
Singh,  father  of  the  present  Raja ;  leaving  also  a  younger  son,  the  Kunwar 
Harnam  Singh,  C.I.E.  (q.v.\  and  a  daughter  married  to  the  Sardar  Buta 
Singh  of  Sirnanwa.  The  area  of  the  State  is  598  square  miles;  its 
population  is  252,617,  chiefly  Muhammadans,  but  including  82,900  Hindus 
and  26,493  Sikhs.  In  addition  to  this,  the  Oudh  estates  of  His  Highness 
have  an  area  of  700  square  miles,  and  a  population  of  253,000.  The  Raja 
maintains  a  military  force  of  197  cavalry,  829  infantry,  and  13  guns;  and  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residences.  —  Kapurthala,  Punjab ;  and  Bhitauli,  Baundi,  and  Ikauna, 
Oudh. 


234  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

KARA  AHMAD.     See  Muhammad  Jam  Jah  Ali. 

KARAM  HUSAIN  walad  ALI  GAUHAR  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

KARAM  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Mirs  or 
Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence* — Shika~rpur,  Sind. 

KARAMDAD  KHAN  (of  Pharwala),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  Raja  succeeded  his  father  in  March 
1865,  as  the  foremost  of  the  Gakkar  Chiefs  of  the  Punjab.  The  Gakkars 
trace  their  descent  from  Kai  Gohar,  of  Ispahan  in  Persia,  whose  son, 
Sultan  Kaid,  is  said  to  have  conquered  Badakshan  and  a  part  of  Tibet.  For 
many  hundreds  of  years  the  Gakkars  were  undoubtedly  possessed  of  great 
power  and  a  wide  extent  of  territory ;  they  overran  Kashmir  in  very  early 
times,  and  traces  of  their  occupation  are  still  to  be  found  in  the  north  and 
west  of  that  country.  They  are  usually  of  the  Shia  sect  of  Muhammadans. 
When  the  Emperor  Babar  invaded  India,  Hati  Khan  was  the  Chief  of  the 
Gakkars ;  and  in  the  Emperor's  Autobiography  there  is  a  notice  of  his 
contest  with  that  Chief.  Babar  marched  against  Pharwala — then,  as  now, 
the  capital  of  the  Gakkars — in  1526  A.D.,  and  captured  it  after  a  gallant 
resistance,  Hati  Khan  making  his  escape  from  one  gate  of  the  town  as 
Babar's  troops  entered  by  another.  Sultan  Mukarrab  Khan  was  the  last 
independent  Gakkar  Chief,  and  in  his  day  the  power  of  the  Gakkars  was  very 
great.  He  defeated  the  Yusufzai  Afghans  and  the  Chief  of  the  Khattaks, 
and  captured  Gujrat,  overrunning  the  Chib  country  as  far  north  as  Bhimbar. 
He  joined  Ahmad  Shah  Durani  on  his  several  invasions  of  India,  and  was 
treated  by  that  monarch  with  the  greatest  consideration,  being  confirmed  in 
the  possession  of  his  large  territories,  which  extended  from  the  Chinab  to  the 
Indus.  Mukarrab  Khan  was  at  last  defeated  by  the  powerful  Sikh  Chief, 
Sardar  Gujar  Singh,  Bhangi,  and  compelled  to  retire  across  the  Jhelum, 
giving  up  his  possessions  in  the  Chaj  Doab.  His  power  being  thus  broken, 
the  rival  Chiefs  of  his  own  tribe  declared  against  him,  and  he  was 
treacherously  put  to  death.  He  left  four  sons,  of  whom  the  youngest  was 
Sultan  Shadman  Khan,  grandfather  of  the  present  Raja.  The  family  were 
greatly  impoverished,  weakened,  and  stripped  of  most  of  their  possessions,  by 
the  attacks  first  of  Sardar  Gujar  Singh,  and  subsequently  of  Anand  Singh, 
Thipuria,  grandson  of  the  famous  Sardar  Milkha  Singh  of  Rawalpindi.  In 
1826  the  family  was  conceded  some  proprietary  rights  in  Pharwala,  the 
ancient  cradle  and  home  of  their  race.  Shadman  Khan's  eldest  son  was 
Hayat-ulla-Khan,  who  became  Raja ;  he  rendered  excellent  service  under 
Captain  Abbott  in  1848-49,  and  again  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  He  was 
succeeded  by  the  present  Raja  in  1865. 

Residence. — Pharwdla,  Rawalpindi,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  235 


KARAN  SINGH,  Rao. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Aligarh,  North- Western  Provinces. 

KARASGI,  Chief  of.     See  Jath. 

KARAULI,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJA  BONWAR  PAL  DEO 
BAHADUR  YADUKUL  CHANDRA  BHAL,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1862  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i4th  August  1886.  Is  the  head  01 
the  great  Jadun  clan  of  Rajputs,  who  claim  descent  from  Krishna,  and  are 
called  the  Chandravansi  or  Children  of  the  Moon.  The  title  of  Maharaja 
has  descended  to  them  from  the  remotest  antiquity.  Probably  the  first 
historical  personage  in  the  pedigree  is  Bijai  Pal,  who  built  the  fort  of  Biana 
in  995  A.D.  Arjan  Deo,  in  1348  A.D.,  established  the  State,  and  founded 
the  capital  of  Karauli  in  Rajputana.  The  Maharaja  Dharm  Pal  became 
Maharaja  of  Karauli  in  1644  A.D.  ;  and  the  present  Maharaja  Bahadur  is 
ninth  in  succession  from  Dharm  Pal.  The  Maharaja  Madan  Pal  rendered 
good  service  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  sending  a  body  of  his  troops  against 
the  Kotah  mutineers ;  and  for  these  services  he  received  an  addition  of  two 
guns  to  his  salute  as  a  personal  distinction,  and  was  created  a  Knight  Grand 
Commander  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  The  area  of 
the  State  is  1208  square  miles;  its  population  is  148,670,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  8836  Muhammadans.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military 
force  of  281  cavalry,  1640  infantry,  and  56  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute 
of  1 7  guns.  The  family  banner  is  coloured  yellow. 

Residence. — Karauli,  Ra"jputa"na. 


KARENNI,  WESTERN,  PO  BYA,  Chief  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Po  Bya  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Karen  States  in  Burma.  Its  population 
consists  almost  entirely  of  Karens.  It  has  three  feudatory  dependencies — 
Bawlake,  Kyetpogyi,  and  Naungpale. 

Residence. — Western  Karenni,  Burma. 


KARIM  KHAN,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

Born  1813;  belongs  to  a  Pathan  (Afghan)  family  settled  in  Unao,  Oudh. 
He  was  distinguished  for  his  bravery  and  loyalty  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857, 
when  he  held  the  military  rank  of  Subahdar ;  and  in  recognition  thereof  he 
received  the  title  of  Sardar  Bahadur  as  a  personal  distinction,  by  a  sanad 
dated  i8th  September  1860. 

Residence. — Unao,  Oudh. 


236  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

KARIM-UD-DIN  AHMAD,  Khan  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890. 
Residence. — Meerut,  North- Western  Provinces. 


KABODIA,  THAKUR  CHAIN  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1864;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  26th  October  1880.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Karodia,  Indore,  Central  India. 

KAROLI,  THAKUR  BHAWANSINGH  JI,   Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born   1856;    belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.     The  area  of  the 
State  is  12  square  miles;  its  population  about  1500,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Karoli,  Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

KAROND,  RAJA  RAGHU  KBSHAR  DEO,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1871  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  7th  April  1881.  Belongs  to  an 
ancient  Rajput  family  of  the  Nagbansi  (snake-race)  clan — the  cognisance  of 
the  Nagbansi  clan  is  the  sacred  Serpent — descended  on  the  female  side  from 
the  original  Gangabansi  dynasty  of  Karond,  and  on  the  male  side  from  the 
Rajas  of  Satrangarh  in  Chota  Nagpur.  The  late  Raja,  Udit  Partab  Deo,  for 
his  good  services  to  Government,  received  the  honour  of  a  personal  salute  of 
nine  guns,  which  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the 
Proclamation  of  her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  The 
present  Raja  is  thirty-first  in  descent  from  the  founder  of  the  dynasty.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  3745  square  miles;  and  its  population  is  224,548, 
chiefly  Gonds  (an  aboriginal  tribe).  The  Raja  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of 
9  guns. 

Residence. — Karond,  Sambalpur,  Central  Provinces. 


KARVETNAGAR,  Rdjd  of. 
See  Kumara  Venkata  Perumal  Raz,  Rdjd. 

KASHI  CHANDAR  DATT,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 

Residence. — Joinshar,  Dacca,  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  237 


KASHI  NATH  BISWAS,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  October  1830.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
The  Rai  Bahadur's  great-grandfather  was  in  the  service  of  the  Nawab  Nazim 
of  Bengal;  and  his  father  and  grandfather  were  employed  under  the 
Governor-General's  agent  at  Benares.  He  entered  the  Judicial  Service  in 
1856;  became  a  first-grade  Subordinate  Judge  in  1875,  and  received  a 
Silver  Medal  of  Honour  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi  in  January 
1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India.  He  received  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur  in  recognition  of  his  long  and 
meritorious  services  as  a  Judge. 

Residence. — Benares,  North- Western  Provinces. 


KASHINATH  LAKSHMAN,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Born  1 6th  July  1833.  The  title  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883,  for 
long  and  distinguished  service  in  the  Police  Department,  in  Khandesh, 
Bombay.  The  Rao  Bahadur  belongs  to  a  Karhada  Brahman  family,  and 
was  the  son  of  Lakshuman  Krishna,  of  the  Political  Department  and  Police 
of  Khandesh.  Was  invested  with  the  title  of  Rao  Bahadur  at  a  Darbar  held 
at  Dhulia  on  i5th  June  1883.  In  1846  he  married  Ganga,  the  only 
daughter  of  the  late  Jagirdar  of  Waroda ;  and  has  issue  four  sons — 
(i)  Martand,  born  3oth  July  1865,  married  Lakshmibai,  daughter  of 
Purushotam  Pant  Khandekar;  (2)  Waman,  born  27th  July  1867,  married 
Jankibai,  daughter  of  Prathad  Pant  Shahane,  Mamlatdar  of  Tasgaon  ;  (3) 
Govinda,  born  28th  August  1871,  married  Gopikabai,  daughter  of  Madhava 
Rao  Khandekar  Phadnis,  late  Mamlatdar  of  Satara;  (4)  Gopal,  born  24th 
June  1878,  married  Rukhminibai,  daughter  of  Narayan  Rao  Bhopatkar  of 
Azvi. 

Residence. — Jalgaon,  Khdndesh,  Bombay. 


KASHINATH  TRIMBAK  TBLANG-,  C.I.E.,  The  Hon. 

A  distinguished  member  of  the  Bombay  Bar.     Was  created  a  Companion 
of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  23rd  May  1884. 


KASHMIR,  His  Highness  the  Mahdrdjd  Bahddur  of. 
See  Jammu  and  Kashmir. 


KASIM  HUSAIN  TAJ-UL-MULK  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  Prince  is  the  ninth  son  of  the  late  Wajid  AH  Shah,  King  of  Oudh ; 
and  accordingly  bears  this  title  as  a  personal  or  courtesy  title, 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


238  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KASSALPURA,  THAKUR  MANAJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1823;  belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.     The  population  of 
the  State  is  about  400. 

Residence. — Kassalpura,  Mahi  Kantha,  Bombay. 


KASTUR  CHAND,  SETH,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 

Residence. — Kamthi,  Central  Provinces. 

KASTUR  CHAND,  Seth. 

The  title  is  personal ;  it  was  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the 
Carnatic,  and  was  recognised  on  i6th  December  1890  by  the  British 
Government. 

Residence. — Jaipur,  Madras. 


KATARI  SUBBARAYUDU  NAYUDU,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Born  in  1837.  The  title  was  conferred  on  25th  June  1884,  for 
meritorious  services  rendered  in  the  Madras  Police.  Son  of  the  late  K. 
Subbarayudu  Nayudu.  Educated  at  Masulipatam.  After  four  years'  service 
in  the  Inam  Commission,  was  appointed  to  the  Madras  Police  in  the  Kistna 
district  in  1866.  Received  a  Gold  Medal  from  the  Mysore  State  for  courage 
and  ability  shown  in  suppressing  a  notorious  gang  of  dakaits.  In  1891 
received  a  jewelled  Sword  of  Honour  for  similar  services  from  the  British 
Government.  Has  two  sons — Katari  Narayanaswami  and  Katari  Subbarao. 

Residence. — Nandigama,  Kistna,  Madras. 


KATHI,  CHANDRA  SINGH  RAHI  PADRI,  Chief  of . 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1866;  belongs  to  a  Bhil  (aboriginal)  family.  The  area  of  the 
State,  which  is  one  of  the  Mewas  States  in  Khandesh,  is  about  500  square 
miles;  its  population  rather  over  10,000,  chiefly  Bhils.  The  Mewas  Chiefs 
maintain  a  force  of  irregulars,  called  Sibandis,  who  collect  the  revenue,  attend 
the  Chiefs,  and  keep  order  on  the  frontier  and  perform  other  police  duties 
under  the  Khandesh  Superintendent  of  Police.  Besides  these  irregulars,  a 
considerable  number  of  Bhil  headmen,  naiks,  are  bound,  if  called  upon  by 
their  Chiefs,  to  furnish  from  30  to  50  bowmen  apiece. 

Residence. — Kathi,  Khandesh,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  239 


KATHIWARA,  THAKUR  BAHADUR  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1839  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1865.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  68  square  miles  ;  its  population 
is  2376,  Hindus  and  Bhils.  The  Thakur  maintains  a  military  force  of  39 
infantry. 

Residence. — Kathiwara,  BhopaVar,  Central  India. 

KATOSAN,  THAKUR  KARANSINGHJI  RANAJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1850  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2  ist  January  1869.     Belongs  to  a  Koli 
(Hindu)  family.     The  population  of  the  State  is  about  1743. 
Residence. — Katosan,  Mahi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

KAWARDHA,  THAKUR  RAJPAL  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 3th  November  1849  >  succeeded  to  fatgadi  i  ith  December  1874. 
Belongs  to  a  Raj  Gond  (aboriginal)  family,  claiming  descent  from  Sham 
Chand,  from  whom  the  present  Thakur  is  thirteenth  in  descent.  His  father 
was  the  Thakur  Ram  Singh  of  Pandaria.  The  area  of  the  State  is  887  square 
miles  ;  its  population  is  86,362,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Kawardha,  Bildspur,  Central  Provinces. 

KAWASJI  HORMASJI  DADA  CHARJI,  Khan  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence.  — Aden. 

KAWASJI  JAMSHBDJI  LALKAKA,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Bora  ^i 9th  September  1851.  The  title  was  conferred  on  2 ist  February 
1884,  for!eminent  services  rendered  to  the  State  in  the  Postal  Department. 
Belongs  to  a  Parsi  family,  son  of  Jamshedji  Dosabji  Lalkaka.  Is  a  Justice 
of  the  Peace,  April  1881.  Acted  as  Deputy  Postmaster- General  of  the 
Central  Provinces  and  Berar  in  1889,  and  of  Rajputana  in  1890.  Married, 
3rd  December  1873,  Manikbai,  daughter  of  Nasarwanji  Khurshidji  Sabavala 
of  Surat;  and  has  issue  two  sons — Jahangir,  born  29th  May  1875, 
Kaikhushro,  born  27th  June  1878. 

Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 

KAWASJI  KAIKHUSRU,  Khdn  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Bombay. 


24o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

KAYATHA,  THAKUR  SHBODAN  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1848  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  1863.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu) 
family. 

Residence. — Kayatha,  Indore,  Central  India. 

KAZIM  ALI,  Mirza  Bahadur. 

The  Mirza  Bahadur  is  the  grandson  of  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shah, 
King  of  Oudh,  being  a  son  of  the  Mirza  Azim-us-Shan  Bahadur,  son  of  that 
monarch. 

Residence. — Oudh . 

KAZIM  ALI  KHAN  (1),  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  is  a  grandson  of  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shah, 
King  of  Oudh,  being  a  son  of  the  Nawab  Muazzam-ud-daula  Bahadur,  by  a 
daughter  of  that  monarch. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

KAZIM  ALI  KHAN  (2),  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  is  a  great-grandson  of  the  late  Saadat  Ali  Khan, 
King  of  Oudh,  being  a  son  of  the  Nawab  Ikhtiar-ud-daula  Bahadur,  who 
was  a  grandson  of  that  monarch. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

KBDAR  NATH  CHATTARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  June  1885. 
Residence. — Bali,  Bengal. 

KBDAR  NATH  KUNDU  CHAUDHRI,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1884. 
Residence. — Howrah,  Bengal. 

KEHAR  SINGH  (of  Khiva),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Sikh  family  descended  from  the 
Sardar  Rai  Maha  Singh ;  who,  with  his  son,  Sardar  Laha  Singh,  fell  in  battle 
in  the  service  of  Sardar  Charat  Singh,  head  of  the  Sikh  misl  or  confederacy 
known  as  Sukarchakia,  and  grandfather  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of 
Lahore.  Sardar  Amar  Singh,  son  of  Laha  Singh,  was  taken  into  the  service 
of  Sardar  Charat  Singh,  received  a  jdgir,  and  served  with  distinction  under 
Charat  Singh's  son,  Sardar  Dayal  Singh,  and  under  his  grandson  the  Maha- 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  241 

raja.  After  his  death  his  three  sons,  Sardars  Fateh  Singh,  Dayal  Singh,  and 
Mohar  Singh,  rose  into  favour  with  the  Maharaja ;  and  the  last  especially 
distinguished  himself  in  an  action  with  the  Afghans  at  Khiva  in  the  Gujrat 
district.  Mohar  Singh  subsequently  retired  to  Benares,  and  the  Maharaja 
Ranjit  Singh  confiscated  lusjdgirs.  His  brother,  Sardar  Dayal  Singh  (grand- 
father of  the  present  Sardar),  fought  in  the  battle  of  Attock,  1813,  where  he 
was  severely  wounded;  and  he  was  again  wounded  in  the  expedition  to  Kashmir, 
for  which  he  received  some  valuable  jdgirs.  He  died  in  1832  ;  and  his  son, 
Sardar  Bishan  Singh,  died  two  years  afterwards,  leaving  Kishan,  a  child  of 
two  years  of  age.  Sardar  Kishan  Singh  was  loyal  in  the  time  of  the  Multan 
rebellion  of  1848-49;  and  later,  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  he 
rendered  good  service  to  Government,  and  was  rewarded  for  it.  He  died  in 
1860,  and  Sardar  Kehar  Singh  is  the  surviving  member  of  the  family.  He 
is  also  known  as  the  Sardar  Nand  Singh. 
Residence. — Khiva,  Gujra"t  district,  Punjab. 

KEONTHAL,  RAJA  BALBIR  SAIN,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1852;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  August  1882.  Belongs  to  a 
very  ancient  Rajput  family,  that  bore  the  title  of  Rana  from  early  times  till 
1857,  when  the  title  of  Raja  was  conferred  on  Rana  Sansar  Sain  for  his 
services  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny.  After  the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas  a 
portion  of  the  State  was  made  over  to  the  Maharaja  of  Patiala,  and  the 
remainder  was  confirmed  to  the  then  Rana  by  a  sanad  of  the  British  Govern- 
ment in  1815.  He  has  six  feudatory  Chiefs  subordinate  to  him,  viz.  the 
Chiefs  of  Thiog,  Koti,  Ghund,  Kheri,  Madhan,  and  Ratesh;  and  of  these 
the  first  four  are  tributaries.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1 1 2  square  miles  ;  its 
population  is  31,154,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force 
of  1 08  infantry  and  2  guns. 

Residence. — Keonthal,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 

KERALA  VARMA  RAJA,  Rdjd.     See  Chirakal,  Valiya  Rdjd  of. 

KERALA  VARMA  RAJA,  Rdjd.     See  Kottayam,  Valiya  Rdjd  of. 

KEROWLEE,  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of.     See  Karauli. 

KESHAB  KANTA  SINGH,  Rdjd. 

Bom  November  1852.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd 
February  1861,  the  Raja  being  the  grandson  and  representative  of  the  late 
Raja  Chandra  Kanta  Singh,  the  last  reigning  Raja  of  Assam.  Belongs  to 
the  historical  Ahom  dynasty,  who  were  rulers  in  Assam  for  many  centuries, 
and  are  said  to  have  been  originally  Shans  from  Burma.  The  first  Raja  of 
the  dynasty  who  adopted  Hinduism  is  stated  to  have  been  Chuhum-Pha,  who 
succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1497  A.D.  From  him  the  fourth  in  succession, 
Raja  Chutum-Hla,  adopted  the  Hindu  name  of  Jayadhajiya  Singh  •  and  he 


242  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

was  reigning  at  the  time  of  the  Mughal  invasion  by  Mir  Jumla  under  the 
orders  of  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb.  The  invasion  was  unsuccessful,  and  the 
Ahom  Raja  extended  his  frontier  to  Goalpara.  The  greatest  of  the  dynasty 
was  Raja  Rudra  Singh,  who  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1695  ;  and  in  the  next 
century  their  power  decayed.  Raja  Gaurinath  Singh  was  the  titular  Raja 
when  the  British  first  sent  a  force  into  Assam  in  1792  to  restore  him  after 
his  expulsion  by  the  Koch  Raja  of  Darrang.  Then  followed  an  invasion  of 
the  Burmese,  who  ruled  the  country  till  the  first  Burmese  war ;  at  the  close 
of  which  Assam  was  ceded  by  Burma  to  the  British  Power.  Raja  Gaurinath 
Singh  had  been  succeeded  in  title  by  his  brother,  Raja  Chandra  Kanta  Singh  ; 
and  the  grandson  of  the  latter  is  the  present  Raja.  The  family  cognisance  is 
an  Arowan  (Royal  Umbrella)  and  Sripus  Kalki  (Golden  Head-dress). 
Residence. — Gauha~ti,  Assam. 


KESHAVRAO  BHASKARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence.  — Bombay. 

KESRI  SINGH  (of  Lakhnadon),  Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Thakur  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
ancient  Chiefs  of  the  Seoni  district. 

Residence. — Lakhnadon,  Seoni,  Central  Provinces. 


KESRI  SING-H,  C.I.E.  (of  Kucha-wan),  Rao  Bahddur. 

The  title  of  Rao  Bahadur  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i  st  January 
1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty 
as  Empress  of  India.  He  has  subsequently  been  created  a  Companion  of 
the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 

Residence. — Mdrwdr,  Rajputa~na. 

KET,  MAUNG,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888.  It  means 
"Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Yaw,  Burma. 

KEUNJHAR,  MAHARAJA  DHANURJAI  NARAYAN  BHANJ 

DEO,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  27th  July  1849  ;  succeeded  to  \hzgadi  as  a  minor  4th  September 
1 86 1.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  Joti 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  243 

Bhanj,  a  brother  of  Adi  Bhanj,  the  founder  of  the  Moharbhanj  State  (q.v.\ 
thirty-four  generations  back.     The  following  is  the  local  tradition  as  to  the 
way  in  which  the  Keunjhar  Rajas  got  the  patronymic  of  Bhanj ,  in  which  the 
State  got  the  name  of  Keunjhar,  and  in  which  its  borders  were  enlarged : — 
Jai  Singh,  a  son  of  Man  Singh,  the  Maharaja  of  Jaipur  in  Rajputana,  came  to 
visit  the  shrine  of  Jagannath  in  Puri.    He  married  Padmavati,  the  daughter  of 
the  Gajapati  King  of  Puri,  Pratapendra  Deb,  and  received  as  her  dowry  the 
State  of  Hariharpur,  which  then  comprised  the  two  States  of  Moharbhanj  and 
Keunjhar.     Two  sons  were  born  to  him,  the  elder  of  whom  was  named  Adi 
Singh  and  the  younger  Joti  Singh.     In  mauza  Rarua  in  killa  Hariharpur 
there  was  a  petty  Zamindar  named  Mayura  Dhwaja  in  possession  of  five  pirs. 
He  was  conquered  by  Prince  Adi  Singh,  and  deprived  of  his  Zamindari.     The 
Gajapati  King  of  Puri,  hearing  of  the  success  of  Prince  Adi  Singh,  conferred 
on   him   the  title    of  Bhanj.     Since  that   time  the  above  title  has   been 
hereditary  in  the  Moharbhanj  and  Keunjhar  Raj  families.     Adi  Singh  on  his 
accession  to  the  gadi  changed  the  name  of  Hariharpur  into  Moharbhanj,  and 
in  commemoration  of  his  conquest  of  the  territory  of  Mayura  Dhwaja,  called 
it  and  the  villages  comprised  in  it  Adipur  Pir,  after  his  own  name.     Prior  to 
his  death,  Jai  Singh  separated  from  his  killa  a  portion  of  land  which  at 
present  goes  by  the  name  of  Nijgarh  zillah,  and  left  it  in  possession  of  his 
younger  son,  Joti    Bhanj.      Thereupon    the    latter   left    Moharbhanj,    and 
established  a  garh  (fort)    at    Jotipur,  where  he  dwelt.      Subsequently  he 
removed  his  headquarters  to  a  place  where  there  was  a  spring  (jhar)  in  an 
ebony  (kendu)  forest ;  and  since  then  the  headquarters  and  the  killa  itself 
are  called  Kendu-Jhar  or  Keunjhar.     Jotipur  Garh,  with  its  adjoining  villages, 
was  annexed  to  killa  Keunjhar  and  called  Jotipur  Pir.     The  boundaries  of 
killa  Keunjhar  since  its  foundation  by  Joti  Bhanj  up  to  the  reign  of  Govind 
Bhanj  are  laid  down  in  the  topographical  maps  which  were  prepared  by 
Government  between   1850  and   1862.     Govind  Bhanj  being  offended  for 
some  reason  or  other  with  his  father,  Trilochan  Bhanj,  retired  to  Puri  and 
lived  there.      He  was  appointed  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  army  of  the 
Gajapati  King  of  Puri,  and  gained  a  victory  for  him  in  the  battle  of  Kanchi- 
Cavery  in  the  Madras  Presidency.     Soon  after,  being  informed  of  his  father's 
death,  he  got  the  permission  of  the  Puri  Raja  to  return  home.     Before  his 
departure  he  obtained  as  a  reward  from  the  Raja  the  Zamindari  of  Athgarh, 
which  adjoined  the  eastern  border  of  the  Keunjhar  State,  and  on  his  return 
from  Puri  he  was  installed  on  the  Keunjhar  gadi.     Since  that  date  the  zillah 
of  Athgarh    has    remained  annexed   to  killa  Keunjhar.     It  is  commonly 
known  as  Anandpur.     In  1794  A.D.  Janardan  Bhanj  married  Krishnapriya, 
the  daughter  01  Manipal  and  grand-daughter  of  Arnapurna,  the  Rani  of  Pal 
Lahera,  and  received  as  dowry  the  Zamindari  of  Pal  Lahera.     On  the  death 
of  Krishnapriya  in  1825,  the  petty  Zamindars  of  Pal  Lahera  combined  with 
the  ryots  of  that  State  and  opposed  Janardan  Bhanj 's  possession  of  Pal 
Lahera.     From  1794  to  1825  the  Raja  of  Keunjhar  had  full  authority  over 
Pal  Lahera ;  and  though  the  latter  was  subsequently  made  independent,  it 
still  pays  its  tribute  through  the  former.     The  title  of  Raja  is  hereditary  in 
this  family,  and  dates  from  the  period  of  the  Mahratta  dominion  in  Orissa ; 
it  was  formally  conferred  by  the  British  Government  in  1874.      The  title  of 
Maharaja  was  conferred  on  the   present  Chief  as  a   personal  distinction, 
ist    January    1877,    on    tne    occasion  of  the  Proclamation    of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.     The  cognisance  of  the  family  is  a 


244  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

peacock  with  the  tail  spread.  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the 
Orissa  Tributary  Mahals,  is  3096  square  miles;  its  population  is  215,612, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  nearly  20,000  belonging  to  various  aboriginal 
tribes.  The  Maharaja  maintains  a  military  force  of  2949  infantry  and  32 
guns. 

Residence. — Keunjhar,  Orissa,  Bengal. 


KHADIJA  BEGAM  SAHIBA,  Princess. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  nth  March  1866. 
Residence. — Madras. 


KHAIR-UN-NISA  BBGAM,  Her  Highness  the  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  personal ;  it  was  originally  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the 
Carnatic,  and  recognised  on  i6th  December  1890.  Her  Highness  is  the  Shadi 
widow  of  His  Highness  the  late  Nawab  Ghulam  Muhammad  Ghaus  Khan, 
last  titular  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic. 

Residence. — M  adras. 


KHAIRAGARH,  KAMAL  NARAYAN  SINGH,  Zaminddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1879;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  death  of  Lai  Umrao  Singh, 
1 9th  February  1891.  Belongs  to  a  Raj  Gond  (aboriginal)  family,  claiming 
descent  from  the  ancient  royal  family  of  Garha  Mandla.  The  area  of 
the  State  is  940  square  miles;  its  population  is  166,138,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Khairagarh,  Raipur,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  245 


KHAIRPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MIR  SIR  ALI  MURAD  KHAN, 

G.C.I.R,  Mir  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  28th  June  1815;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2oth  December  1842. 
Is  the  representative  of  the  historical  Baluch  family  called  Talpur,  that  con- 
quered Sind  in  1783  A.D.  In  that  year  Mir  Fateh  AH  Khan  Talpur 
established  himself  as  Rais  of  Sind;  and  subsequently  his  nephew,  Mir 
Sohrab  Khan  Talpur,  with  his  two  sons,  named  respectively  Mir  Rustam  and 
Ali  Murad — the  last-named  being  the  present  Mir  of  Khairpur — founded  the 
Khairpur  branch  of  the  Talpur  rulers  of  Sind.  Mir  Sohrab  Khan  gradually 
extended  his  dominions  until  they  extended  from  the  Jaisalmer  Desert  on  the 
east  to  Kachh  Gandava  in  Baluchistan  on  the  west.  In  1 8 1 3  he  ceased  to  pay 
tribute  to  Afghanistan;  and  in  1832  Khairpur  was  recognised  as  a  separate 
State  from  the  rest  of  Sind,  in  a  treaty  with  the  British  Power.  During  the 
first  Afghan  war,  when  most  of  the  Sind  Mirs  were  believed  to  be  hostile,  the 
Mir  Ali  Murad  Khan  cordially  supported  the  British  policy.  Consequently, 
when,  after  the  close  of  that  war,  the  victory  of  Miani  (Meeanee)  effected 
the  conquest  of  Sind,  and  the  rest  of  Sind  was  annexed  and  incorporated 
in  the  British  territory,  the  State  of  Khairpur  retained  its  political  existence 
as  a  feudatory  of  the  Empire.  In  1866  a  sanad  was  granted  to  His  High- 
ness, guaranteeing  the  succession  according  to  Muhammadan  law ;  and  he 
has  recently  been  created  a  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent 
Order  of  the  Indian  Empire.  His  Highness's  sons  are  Mir  Faiz  Muhammad 
Khan,  Mir  Jan  Muhammad  Khan,  and  Mir  Ghulam  Haidar.  The  area 
of  the  State  is  6109  square  miles;  its  population  is  129,153,  chiefly 
Muhammadans,  but  including  more  than  26,000  Hindus.  His  Highness 
maintains  a  military  force  of  700  cavalry,  774  infantry,  and  32  guns;  and  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  19  guns  (including  4  guns  personal). 

Residence. — Khairpur,  Sind,  Bombay. 


246  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

KHAJURIA,  MIAN  KARIM  BAKSH,    Mian  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859;  succeeded  to  \htgadi  24th  December  1863.  Belongs  to  a 
Pindari  (Muhammadan)  family.  The  population  of  the  State  is  467,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Khajuria,  Bhopal,  Central  India. 

KHALTHAUN,  THAKUR  HARGAYAN  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Bom  1864;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1883.  Belongs  to  a  Kshatriya 
Yadav  (Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  5  square  miles ;  its  popula- 
tion is  about  8000,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Thakur  maintains  a  military  force 
of  15  cavalry  and  50  infantry. 

Residence. — Khalthaun,  Gwalior,  Central  India. 

KHAN  BABA  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 

Residence. — Peshdwar,  Punjab. 


KHAN  MUHAMMAD  walad  WALI  MUHAMMAD  KHAN, 

Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 

Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

KHANDBRAO  APPAJI,  GUPTE,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal. 
Residence. — Thdnd,  Bombay. 

KHANDBRAO  SIDRAMAPA  DESAI  NADGAODA  (of  Kurbet), 

Shrimdn  Maha  Naik  Nadgauda  Nagnuriebirada  Himori. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Chief  of 
Anigundi  on  an  ancestor,  for  having  cleared  the  jungles  of  Gokak  of  the 
bandits  who  frequented  them — and  having  been  recognised  by  the  British 
Government.  Belongs  to  a  Mahratta  (Hindu)  family  claiming  descent  from 
Jogi  Nikumbi  Naik,  through  a  long  series  of  generations.  Khanderao  Baba 
Saheb  succeeded  his  father  Sidramapa  Balapa  Desai. 

Residence. — Belgaum,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  247 


KHANDBRAO  VISHWANATH  EASTS,  Rao  Bahddur. 

Born  1845.  The  title  of  Rao  Bahadur  is  personal,  and  was  conferred 
on  ist  January  1877,  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi,  on  the  occasion 
of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India — when  he  also 
received  a  Medal  of  Honour.  Is  also  a  First  Class  Sardar  of  the  Deccan ; 
and  claims  the  hereditary  rank  of  Sardar.  Belongs  to  a  Konkanasth 
Brahman  family,  resident  from  early  times  in  Velneshwar,  in  the  district  of 
Ratnagiri ;  originally  the  family  name  was  "  Gokhle,"  changed  at  a  later  date 
for  "  Raste."  The  founder  of  the  family  was  named  Ballah.  His  descend- 
ant, Shamji  Naik,  had  three  sons,  who  entered  the  service  of  the  Shahu 
Raja  of  Satara,  in  which  they  acquired  important  positions.  The  second  of 
these,  named  Bhikaji,  had  a  daughter  married  to  the  Peshwa  Narayan  Rao ; 
the  eldest,  named  Haribaji  Naik,  was  the  ancestor  of  this  family.  His  great- 
grandson,  Khanderao  Nilkant  Raste,  was  appointed  to  a  military  command 
by  the  celebrated  Nana  Farnavis  under  the  Peshwa  Mahadeo  Rao  Narayan ; 
he  served  with  great  success  in  many  campaigns,  and  rose  to  high  honours, 
with  considerable  grants  of  land.  His  son,  Vishwasrao  Khanderao,  was  a 
Sardar  of  the  Deccan  of  the  second  class ;  he  was  granted  a  pension  by  the 
Government  in  1819,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  title-holder. 
The  Rao  Bahadur  was  educated  at  the  Poona  College ;  was  a  Member  of  the 
Bombay  Legislative  Council,  1884-86;  is  a  Magistrate  for  Poona,  and  also 
for  Kolaba,  and  a  Justice  of  the  Peace  for  the  town  and  island  of  Bombay. 

Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

KHANDPARA,  RAJA  NATOBAR  SINGH  MARDRAJ 
BHRAMARBAR  RAI,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1837  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  28th  February  1867.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  a  younger  son  of  the  Nayagarh 
family,  seventy-one  generations  ago.  The  Raja  Raghunath  Singh  of 
Nayagarh  had  two  sons.  The  elder  son,  Harihar  Singh,  became  Raja  of 
Nayagarh,  and  the  younger,  Jadunath  Singh  Mangraj,  retained  possession  of 
four  Garhs,  or  forts,  as  his  share,  viz.  Kadua,  Ghuntsahi,  Sardhapur,  and  Khed- 
pada,  all  in  Nayagarh.  There  was  at  that  time  a  Chief  ruling  over  a  tract  from 
Ogalpur  to  Harichandanpur  in  Khandpara.  Him  the  said  Mangraj  defeated, 
and  took  possession  of  his  territory.  Gradually  in  course  of  time  and  by 
dint  of  arms,  his  son  Pitabas  Singh,  his  grandson  Narayan  Singh,  and 
his  great-grandson  Balunkeswar  Singh  extended  their  dominions,  and 
strengthened  the  State  of  Khandpara.  The  petty  chiefs  who  ruled  within 
the  jurisdiction  of  this  State  during  these  times,  and  their  subjects,  were 
savage  aborigines.  The  Rajas  of  Khandpara  defeated  these  petty  Chiefs, 
gave  education  to  the  savages,  cleared  the  jungles,  formed  villages,  and 
civilised  the  country.  Up  to  the  reign  of  Raja  Narayan  Singh  Mangraj, 
Khandpara  extended  on  the  east  up  to  Banki,  on  the  west  to  Balaramprasad 
in  Daspalla,  on  the  north  to  Kantilo,  and  on  the  south  up  to  Jogiapali  in 
Nayagarh.  During  the  reign  of  Banamali  Singh  Mardraj  Bhramarbar  Rai, 
son  of  Raja  Balunkeswar  Singh  Mangraj,  the  Raja  of  Bod  did  not  give  the 
State  to  his  adopted  son  Makund  Deb  Bhanj,  whom  he  had  brought  from 
Moharbhanj,  but  gave  it  to  another  person  whom  he  subsequently  adopted  as 


248  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

his  son.  This  gave  offence  to  Makund  Deb  Bhanj,  and  he  consequently 
sought  help  from  the  Raja  of  Khandpara,  Banamali  Singh  Mardraj  Bhramarbar 
Rai.  This  Banamali  was  a  brave  and  powerful  Raja,  and  expert  in  war. 
He  engaged  the  Raja  of  Bod,  and  after  defeating  him  made  the  said  Makund 
Deb  Bhanj  Raja  over  a  part  of  Bod  territory,  and  gave  the  new  State  the 
name  of  Daspalla.  Raja  Jadunath  Singh  Mangraj,  the  founder  of  the 
Khandpara  State,  got  the  title  of  Mangraj  from  the  Maharaja  of  Orissa,  and 
it  was  enjoyed  from  his  time  down  to  Balunkeswar  Singh.  Banamali  Singh, 
the  son  of  Balunkeswar  Singh,  was  a  very  powerful  Chief,  and  defended  the 
Maharaja  of  Orissa  from  the  attacks  of  his  enemies.  The  latter  gave  him  as 
a  reward  the  title  of  Bhai  Mardraj  Bhramarbar  Rai,  which  has  been  enjoyed 
by  successive  Chiefs  to  the  present  day.  During  the  reign  of  Raja  Niladri 
Singh  Mardraj  Bhramarbar  Rai,  Raghuji  Bhonsle,  the  Maharaja  of  Nagpur, 
gave  the  Raja  a  flag,  which  is  still  used.  When  Orissa  was  first  conquered 
by  the  British  Government,  Raja  Narsingha  Singh  Mardraj  Bhramarbar  Rai 
gave  assistance  to  the  chief  military  officers  of  the  British  Government,  and 
received  an  elephant  and  a  cannon  in  recognition  thereof.  The  present  Raja 
is  a  son  of  the  late  Raja  Krishna  Chandra  Singh  Mardraj  Bhramarbar  Rai ; 
and  succeeded  his  brother,  the  late  Kunja  Vihari  Singh  Mardraj  Bhramarbar 
Rai,  who  died  without  issue  in  1867.  The  title  of  Raja  is  hereditary  in  the 
family,  and  dates  from  the  period  of  the  Mahratta  dominion  in  Orissa ;  it  was 
formally  recognised  by  the  British  Government  in  1874.  The  cognisance 
of  the  family  is  a  tiger's  head.  The  State,  which  is  one  of  the  Orissa  Tributary 
Mahals,  has  an  area  of  244  square  miles,  and  a  population  of  66,296,  chiefly 
Hindus.  The  Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  1085  infantry  and  12  guns. 
Residence. — Khandpdrd,  Orissa,  Bengal. 

KHANIADHANA,  RAJA  CHHATAR  SINGH,  Jdgirddr  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1863;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  1 3th  December  1869.  Belongs  to 
the  great  Bundela  (Rajput)  family  of  Orchha,  that  has  given  ruling 
families  to  Panna,  Datia,  Ajaigarh,  and  most  of  the  States  of  Bundelkhand. 
Amresh  was  a  younger  son  of  the  Maharaja  Udit  Singh  of  Orchha,  and 
received  the  territory  of  Khaniadhana  as  his  portion.  Much  of  this  territory 
was  taken  away  by  the  Mahrattas.  Fourth  in  descent  from  Amresh  was  the 
Rajd  Guman  Singh,  who  received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in 
1863.  Guman  Singh  died  in  1869,  and  was  succeeded  by  the  present 
Jagirddr;  who  on  ist  January  1877,  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at  Delhi, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India, 
received  the  title  of  Rajd  as  a  personal  distinction.  The  area  of  the  State  is 
84  square  miles;  its  population  is  13,494,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Raja 
maintains  a  military  force  of  5  cavalry,  65  infantry,  and  2  guns. 

Residence. — Khaniddhdna,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

KHARAL,  MIAN  SURSINGHJI  SARDARSINGHJI,  Mian  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1860;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2oth  April  1884.  Belongs  to  a 
Koli  (Muhammadan)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1 6  square  miles ;  its 
population  3189,  chiefly  Hindus. 

JRest<tence.—Khar£l,  Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  249 


KHARSEDJI  BUSTAMJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 
Residence. — Baroda. 


KHARSIA,  THAKUR  BALWANT  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1855  ;  succeeded  to  the^W/  26th  September  1876.    Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family. 

Residence. — Kharsia,  Bhopa"!,  Central  India. 


KHARSOWAN,  THAKUR  MAHBNDRA  NARAYAN  SINGH 

DEO,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1869;  succeeded  his  father,  Thakur  Raghunath  Singh  Deo,  2nd 
March  1884,  as  a  minor.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  descended 
from  a  younger  son  of  the  ancient  Porahat  family,  that  came  into  Orissa  in 
very  early  times  from  Jodhpur  in  Rajputana.  The  title  of  Thakur  was 
originally  bestowed  by  the  Raja  of  Porahat,  and  has  been  conferred  on  the 
Chief  as  a  personal  distinction.  The  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Chota 
Nagpur  Tributary  Mahals)  has  an  area  of  149  square  miles,  and  a  population 
of  31,051,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Thakur  has  a  military  force  of  3  guns. 

Residence. — Kharsowan,  Singhbhum,  Chota  Nagpur,  Bengal. 


KHERAWARA,  THAKUR  VAJESINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born   1847.     Belongs  to  a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.     The  area  of  his 
State  is  27  square  miles;  its  population  is  over  1300,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Kherawara,  Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

KHERI,  Chief  of. 

Is  a  feudatory  of  the  Raja  of  Keonthal  (q.v.\  and  rules  over  one  of  the 
Simla  Hill  States. 

Residence. — Kheri,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 

KHERWASA,  THAKUR  PARTAB  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1880 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1887.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  population  of  the  State  is  about  500,  Hindus 
and  Muhammadans. 

Residence. — Kherwasa,  Western  Mdlwa",  Central  India. 


250  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KHBT  SINGH  (of  Gobra),  Rdjd. 

Born  4th  February  1842.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally 
conferred  by  one  of  the  old  Gond  Rajas  of  Garha-Mandla,  and  confirmed  by 
Government.  Is  a  descendant  of  Raja  Karan  ;  and  rendered  good  service  in 
the  campaigns  that  followed  the  Mutiny  of  1857. 

Residence. — Gobra,  Damoh,  Central  Provinces. 

KHETTAR  (KSHBTTBA)  CHANDAR  BANARJI,  Rai  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was   conferred  on  6th  December    1884,  for 
services  rendered  in  the  Public  Works  Department. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

KHIANDA,  MADAN  SINGH,   Chief  of . 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1880;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  2yth  December  1889. 
The  population  of  the  State  is  about  noo,  chiefly  Hindus. 
Residence. — Khianda,  Guna,  Central  India. 

KHILAWAN  SINGH  (of  Bilehra),  Rdjd. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

KHILCHIPUR,  RAO  BAHADUR  AMAR  SINGHJI, 

Rao  Bahddur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1834  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2yth  November  1868.  Belongs  to  a 
Khichi  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Durjan  Sal,  a  Khichi  Chief. 
The  area  of  his  State  is  about  272  square  miles;  its  population  36,125, 
chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rao  Bahadur  maintains  a  military  force  of  45  cavalry, 
202  infantry,  and  2  guns;-  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns.  The 
family  has  a  white  banner  (with  black  silk  tassel),  bearing  the  effigy  of 
Hanuman,  the  monkey-god.  The  Rao  Bahadur's  eldest  son  is  named  Lalji 
Bhawani  Singh. 

Residence. — Khilchipur,  Bhopdl,  Central  India. 

KHIRASRA,  JAREJA  RAISINGHJI  JIJIBHAI,   Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  January  1872.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  his  State  is  13  square  miles ;  its  popu- 
lation is  4377,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Khirasra,  Kdthidwdr,  Bombay. 

KHITABAT  KHAN.     See  Muhammad  Ghaus,  Shaikh. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  251 


KHITISH  (KSHITISH)  CHANDAR  RAI  (of  Nadiya), 
Maharaja  Bahadur. 

Born  i6th  April  1868.  The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890,  as 
a  personal  distinction,  when  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  came  of  age  after  a  long 
minority ;  and  it  has  been  enjoyed  by  the  Rajas  of  Nadiya  (or  Nuddea)  for 
many  generations,  having  been  first  conferred  by  the  Emperor  of  Delhi  on 
the  Maharaja  Rudra  ten  generations  ago.  Belongs  to  a  Kulin  Brahman 
family  of  the  highest  caste,  claiming  descent  from  the  famous  Bhatta 
Narayan,  one  of  the  five  Brahman  apostles  whom  King  Adisur  brought  to 
Bengal  from  Kanauj.  A  farmdn  bearing  the  seal  and  signature  of  the 
Emperor  Alamgir  is  extant,  in  which  the  Raja  Rudra  is  addressed  as  Raja. 
His  great-grandson,  the  Maharaja  Krishna  Chandra  Rai,  received  twofarmdns 
from  the  Emperor  Shah  Alam,  conferring  on  him  the  title  of  Maharaja. 
Since  the  establishment  of  British  rule  in  Bengal  each  Raja  of  Nadiya  in 
succession  has  been  created  a  Maharaja  Bahadur.  The  late  Maharaja  Satis 
Chandra  Rai  Bahadur,  Raja  of  Nadiya,  was  eminently  loyal  to  the  Govern- 
ment, and  exceedingly  liberal,  especially  to  his  tenants  and  to  educational 
institutions.  He  presented  a  beautiful  park  as  the  site  for  the  Krishnagar 
State  College  of  the  Calcutta  University,  at  the  town  of  Krishnagar,  which  is 
the  capital  of  Nadiya ;  and  he  subscribed  largely  to  the  funds,  both  for  the 
•  building  and  for  the  endowment  of  that  important  institution.  The  present 
Maharaja  Bahadur  was  his  son  by  adoption,  and  has  only  recently  (1890) 
attained  his  majority. 

Residence. — Krishnagar,  Nadiya",  Bengal. 

KHOJANKHERA,  THAKUR  BAKHTAWAR  SINGH, 

Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born   1860;  succeeded   to   the  gadi  in   1878.      Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family.     The  population  of  the  State  is  about  500. 
Residence. — Khojankhera,  Western  Malwa",  Central  India. 

KHORY,  A.  M.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign. 
Residence. — Mhow,  Central  India. 

KHUDA  BAKHSH,  MAULAVI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1883,  as  a 
reward  for  highly  meritorious  service  as  Government  Pleader. 
Residence. — Patna,  Bengal. 

KHUDA  BAKHSH  KHAN  walad  JAM  NINDO,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation.  He  is  the  only  son  of  the 
Jam  Nindo  Khan,  a  member  of  the  Sohrabani  branch  of  the  Talpur  family. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 


252 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KHUDA  BAKHSH  KHAN,  USHTARANA,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Punjab. 

KHUDADAD  KHAN  walad  KHAN  MUHAMMAD 
KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

KHUDADAD  KHAN,  Khan  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Sukkurri,  Sind. 

KHUMAN  SINGH  (of  Ghatakheri),   Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 

Residence. — Nima"r,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  253 


KHURSHID  JAH,  BAHADUR,  K.C.I.B.,  SIR, 

Nawdb)  Shams-ul-Umara)  Amir-i-Kabir. 

One  of  the  Premier  Nobles  of  the  Hyderabad  State. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur,  who  was  born  about  the  year  1838,  is  the  present 
representative  (with  his  brother,  the  Vikar-ul-Umara,  q.v.,  and  his  cousin,  Sir 
Asman  Jah,  q.v.)  of  the  great  and  powerful  Shamsiya  family,  the  first  among 
the  noble  families  of  Hyderabad,  which  has  been  frequently  connected 
by  marriage  with  the  Ruling  House,  and  entrusted  with  the  hereditary 
command  of  the  Paigah  or  Household  Troops  of  the  Nizam.  Descended 
from  the  famous  captain,  Shaikh  Abul  Khair  Khan,  Ima"m  Jang,  Shamsher 
Bahadur,  who  was  a  Mansabddr  in  Malwa  under  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb. 
He  attached  himself  to  the  fortunes  of  the  great  Asaf  Jah,  the  founder  of  the 
Hyderabad  dynasty,  under  whose  banner  he  rose  to  the  highest  commands. 
In  1745  he  defeated  a  Mahratta  force,  and  under  the  successors  of  Asaf 
Jah,  the  Nizams  Nasir  Jang  and  Salabat  Jang,  he  continued  his  successful 
career.  In  1752  he  died  at  Burhanpur;  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
Abul  Fateh  Khan  Teg  Jang,  who  became  the  first  Noble  of  the  Nizam  Ali, 
obtaining  the  command  of  the  Paigah  or  Household  Troops,  immense 
territorial  possessions,  and  the  titles  of  Shams-ud-daula,  Shams-ul-Mulk,  and 
Shams-ul-Umara.  He  died  in  1786,  when  campaigning  in  Panghul ;  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son,  who  at  the  early  age  of  four  had  received  from 
the  Nizam  the  titles  of  Ba-ud-din  Khan,  Imam  Jang,  Khurshid-ud-daula,  and 
Khurshid-ul-Mulk.  He  succeeded  to  all  the  honours  of  his  father,  and 
became  a  famous  scholar  and  savant,  receiving  at  various  times  the  titles  of 
Teg  Jang,  Shams-ud-daula,  Shams-ul-Mulk,  Shams-ul-Umara  Bahadur,  and  in 
1827  the  title  of  Amir-i-Kabir.  In  1849  ne  became  for  a  short  time  Prime 
Minister  of  Hyderabad.  He  died  in  1862,  leaving  two  sons,  Umdat-ul-Mulk 
(who  became  Amir-i-Kabir)  and  Ikhtidar-ul-Mulk  (who  became  Vikar-ul- 
Umara).  The  former  died  in  1877,  when  the  latter  succeeded  him  in  the 
family  honours,  and  as  Co-Regent  of  the  State,  adding  the  title  of  Amir-i- 
Kabir  to  that  of  Vikar-ul-Umara.  He  died  in  1881,  leaving  two  sons,  the 
Nawab  Sir  Khurshid  Jah  Bahadur  and  the  Nawab  Vikar-ul-Umara  (Ikbal-ud- 
daula,  Bahadur).  Sir  Khurshid  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  on  i6th  February  1877,  on  the  occasion 
of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty ;  and  he  has  held 
the  offices  of  Member  of  the  Council  of  Regency,  and  Member  of  the 
Council  of  State.  The  Nawab  is  a  fine  Persian  and  Urdu  scholar,  and  has 
travelled  in  many  parts  of  India.  Like  their  noble  kinsman  Sir  Asman  Jah, 
both  Sir  Khurshid  Jah  and  his  brother  the  Vikar-ul-Umara  have  shared  the 
fortune  of  their  ancestor,  in  allying  themselves  in  marriage  with  Princesses  of 
the  Royal  House  of  Hyderabad.  In  his  palace  at  Hyderabad  are  to  be 
seen  the  sword  and  armour  of  his  ancestor,  Abul  Fateh  Khan  Teg  Jang,  a 
warrior  of  great  size  and  height. 

Residences. — Hyderabad  ;  Shams-ul-Umara"'s  Baradari,  Hyderabad. 


254 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


(A  circle  with  four  Trisuias  or 
dSep0Sims.)radi         ecar" 


KHUSHAL  SINGH  (of  Rajaur),  Rdjd. 

Born  1846.  The  title  is  hereditary;  the  Raja  being  one  of  the  Chiefs 
of  the  Chauhan  Rajputs,  and  boasting  a  direct  descent  from  Prithiraj,  the 
last  Chauhan  Rajput  Emperor  of  Delhi,  whose 
romantic  history  is  sung  by  every  Hindu  bard,  and 
whose  fall  virtually  transferred  the  sovereignty  of 
India  from  the  Hindus  to  the  Muhammadans. 
Prithiraj  perished  in  battle  with  Shahab-ud-din 
Ghori  in  1193  A.D.  Eighth  in  descent  from  him 
was  the  famous  Bhoj  Raj  of  Hansi,  who  re- 
conquered Ajmir,  the  old  home  of  the  Chauhan 
Rajputs  —  Prithiraj  having  been  the  son  of  a 
Chauhan  Raja  of  Ajmir  by  a  daughter  of  the 

The  Santak  of  the  Chauhan     Tomara   Rajput   Raja  of  Delhi,    Anang   Pal,  and 
having  been  adopted  by  his  maternal  grandfather  at 
Delhi.     Fifth  in  descent  from  Bhoj  Raj  was  Dhira 
Raj,   who  migrated  from  Hansi  to   Bilram;    and 
fourth  in  descent  from  him  was  Sakit   Deo,  who 
founded    Sakit,    and    whose    descendants    were    the    Chauhan    Rajas    of 
Sakit  and  Rajaur.     His    grandson,    Bhupal    Deo,   had   two   sons,    Yahani 
Sahai  and    Udaicharan  ;    the  latter   founded   the   family   of  the    Chauhan 
Rajas  of  Mainpuri,   the  former    remained  as  Raja  of    Sakit  and   Rajaur. 
Seven     generations    later    Raja    Sawant    Sen    was    driven    out    of   these 
ancestral    possessions    by   the    army   of    Ibrahim    Shah    Lodi,    Sultan    ot 
Delhi;    but  after  the    subversion  of  the  Lodi  dynasty  by  the  invasion  of 
Babar  and  his  Mughals,  Sawant  Sen's  grandson,  named  Chakra  Sen,  was 
enabled  to  return  to  Sakit  and  Rajaur  as  a  feudatory  of  the  Mughal  Emperor. 
Eight  generations  followed  each  other  in  peaceful  possession  of  the  Raj 
under  the  strong  arm  of  the  Mughals  ;  and  Raja  Hari  Singh  in  the  time  of 
Aurangzeb  was  famous  for  his  prowess,  won  many  battles,  and  was  high  in 
the  favour  both  of  that  Emperor  and  of  his  successors,  the  Emperors  Farukh- 
siyar  and  Muhammad  Shah.     But  in  the  time  of  Hari  Singh's  son,  Raj 
Singh,  the  country  was  given  up  to  anarchy  ;  and  during  this  disturbed  period 
Sakit  was  seized  by  the  Nawab  of  Farukhabad,  and  was  lost  for  ever,  to  the 
Chauhan  Rajas  of  Rajaur.     Raj  Singh's  grandson  was  Raja  Datta  Singh  ;  and 
the  grandson  of  the  latter  was  the  late  Raja  Drigpal  Singh,  father  of  the 
present  Raja.     Raja  Khushal  Singh  has  two  sons,  Kunwar  Lai  Jagmohan 
Singh,  born  1873  ;  and  Kunwar  Lai  Dharm  Singh,  born  1883. 

Residence.  —  Rajaur,  Etah,  North-  Western  Provinces. 


KHUSHALRAI  SARABHAI,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  255 


KHYRIM,  A.  KHUR  SINGH,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1843;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  4th  December  1871.  The  Seim  is 
Chief  of  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  the  population  of  which 
is  about  24,000,  and  consists  of  Khasis  and  Christian  converts. 

Residence. — Khyrim,  Khasi  Hills,  Assam. 


KINNU  RAI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1829.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  June  1885, 
in  recognition  of  his  loyal  services  during  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  in  1857, 
when  he  protected  the  Stud  property  of  the  Government  at  the  risk  of  his 
own  life. 

Residence. — Ghdzipur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


KIRALI,  CHOLU  walad  APSINGH  NAIK,   Chief  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Bom  1 86 1 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  ist  November  1886.  Belongs  to  a 
Bhil  (aboriginal)  family.  The  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Dang  States  of 
Khandesh)  has  an  area  of  12  square  miles;  and  a  population  of  1671,  chiefly 
Bhils. 

Residence. — Kirali,  Khandesh,  Bombay. 


KIRAT  CHAND  (of  Lambagraon),  Mian. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mian  being  the  brother  of  the  late  Raja 
Partab  Chand  of  Lambagraon,  and  the  uncle  of  the  present  Raja,  Jai  Chand 
(q.v.)  of  Lambagraon,  who  is  the  head  of  the  great  Katoch  Rajput  family  of 
Kangra.  The  Mian  is  the  younger  son  of  Mian  Rudra  Chand  of  Lamba- 
graon, who  was  the  grandson  of  the  Raja  Tegh  Chand  of  Kangra,  and  who 
became  the  head  of  the  Kangra  family  on  the  failure  of  the  elder  branch. 

Residence. — Lambagraon,  Kdngra,  Punjab. 


KIRPAL  SINGH  (of  Dhin),  Sarddr. 

Born  1836.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  is  the  head  of  a  Jat 
family  of  Sikhs,  descended  from  Sardar  Parsa  Singh.  The  latter  was  the 
nephew  and  heir  of  Sardar  Sham  Singh,  who  at  the  time  of  the  decline  of 
the  Mughal  Empire  came  from  the  district  of  Amritsar,  conquered  the  terri- 
tory of  Dhin  in  the  Ambala  district  of  the  Punjab,  and  settled  there.  Parsa 
Singh's  grandson  was  the  Sardar  Ranjit  Singh,  who  was  slain  by  Kanh  Singh, 
and  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Ambala,  Punjab. 


256  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KIRPAL  SINGH,  KUNJAHIA  (of  Botala),  Sarddr. 

Born  1832.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Kshatriya  family  of 
Sikhs,  descended  from  Sardar  Dhanna  Singh.  The  latter  was  an  associate  of 
Sardar  Nodh  Singh,  the  great-grandfather  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh,  and 
he  and  his  descendants  followed  the  fortunes  of  the  ancestors  of  Ranjit 
Singh.  Sardar  Kirpal  Singh's  father,  Sardar  Ganda  Singh,  was  in  attendance 
on  the  Maharaja  Sher  Singh  when  that  prince  was  assassinated,  and  was 
severely  wounded  in  the  endeavour  to  defend  him,  and  was  subsequently 
killed  at  the  battle  of  Firuzshahr,  where  Sardar  Kirpal  Singh  was  also 
wounded.  But  at  the  time  of  the  outbreak  at  Multan,  Sardar  Kirpal  Singh 
was  at  Hazara,  and  remained  faithful  to  the  British  Government,  and  was 
subsequently  confirmed  in  hisjdgirs.  His  brother,  Sardar  Partab  Singh  (q.v.) 
of  Botala,  is  an  Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  of  the  Punjab. 

Residence. — Guj rdn wa" la,  P unj ab. 

KIRPAL  SINGH,  Sarddr,  Rai  Bahadur. 

These  titles   are  personal.     The  first  (Sardar)  was   conferred  on   2nd 
January  1888,  and  the  second  (Rai  Bahadur)  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Rawalpindi,  Punjab. 

KISHAN.     See  Krishan  and  Krishna. 

KISHAN  DATT  SINGH  (of  Oel),  Rdjd. 

Born  1 86 1 ;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Raja  of  Oel,  on  the  i8th  of 
October  1879.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by 
the  late  King  of  Oudh  in  1849,  and  recognised  by  the  British  Government 
ji  December  1877.  Belongs  to  the  Jan  war  family  of  Kheri,  Oudh,  of 
which  the  elder  branch  is  represented  by  the  Raja  Achal  Singh  (q.v.)  of 
Kaimahra.  But  the  late  Raja  of  Oel,  Raja  Anrudh  Singh,  was  recognised  as 
the  head  of  the  Kheri  Janwars  on  account  of  his  great  wealth  and  ability. 
The  family  were  originally  Chauhan  Rajputs  in  the  service  of  the  Sayyids  of 
Pihani,  having  migrated  from  Rajputana  in  the  i6th  century.  In  the  time 
of  Sayyid  Khurd,  Jamni  Khan  Janwar  became  Chaudhri  of  Kheri  in 
1553  A.D.,  with  the  right  to  levy  a  cess  on  all  the  lands  in  that  Pargana.  His 
descendants  gradually  increased  their  possessions,  the  Chaudhri  Parbal  Singh 
Janwar  owning  Oel,  Kaimahra,  and  Khogi ;  and  his  descendant,  the  Rai 
Than  Singh,  of  Oel,  owning  many  more  villages.  In  1838  Rai  Umrao 
Singh  was  the  head  of  the  family.  The  Rai  Bakht  Singh,  grandfather  of  the 
late  Raja  Anrudh  Singh,  built  a  large  and  handsome  temple  at  Oel.  The 
Raja  has  a  son  and  heir,  named  Kunwar  Baldeo  Singh. 

Residence. — Oel,  Kheri,  Oudh. 

KISHAN  KUMAR,  RAI  (of  Sahaspur),  Rdjd. 
Born  25th  December  1848.     The  title  of  Raja  is  personal,  and  was  con- 
ferred on  24th  May  1882,  the  family  title  being  Rai.     Belongs  to  a  Kshatriya 
(Rajput)  family,  said  to  have  come  from  the  Punjab,  and  settled  in  the  district 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  257 

of  Moradabad,  in  the  reign  of  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah,  by  whom  the 
title  of  Rai  was  conferred  on  its  then  head.  On  the  cession  of  Rohilkhand, 
Rai  Atma  Ram,  great-grandfather  of  the  present  Raja,  was  chakladdr  of 
Bijnor,  and  subsequently  he  entered  the  service  of  the  British  Government. 
His  grandson,  the  late  Rai  Pardaman  Kishan,  rendered  good  services  during 
the  Mutiny  of  1857-58,  assisting  the  British  officers  who  had  taken  refuge  at 
Naini  Tal  by  sending  them  money  and  information.  For  these  services  he 
was  rewarded  with  a  grant  of  estates.  The  present  Raja  received  a  Medal  of 
Honour  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India;  and  a  khilat  at  the  Agra  Darbar  of  loth  February  1879.  He  is  an 
Honorary  Magistrate.  He  has  a  son  and  heir,  Kunwar  Raj  Kumar. 
Residence. — Sahaspur,  Moradabad,  North- Western  Provinces. 

KISHAN  KUNWAR  (of  Rdmpur),  Rdni. 

Born  September  1857.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Raja  of  Rampur 
being  the  acknowledged  head  of  the  Rahtor  Rajputs  in  Northern  India,  and 
boasting  direct  descent  from  the  famous  Jaichandra,  the  last  Rahtor  Raja  of 
Kanauj,  who  was  slain  in  1191  A.D.,  when  the  Empire  of  Kanauj  was  sub- 
verted by  Shahab-ud-din  Ghori.  Their  Highnesses  the  Maharajas  of  Jodh- 
pur  and  Bikanir  (q*v.)  are  descended  from  the  eldest  son  of  Jaichandra,  the 
former  being  the  head  of  the  whole  Rahtor  clan ;  and  the  Raja  of  Rampur  is 
descended  from  his  second  son,  who  was  named  Jaipal.  Prajanpal,  the  fifth 
in  descent  from  Jaipal,  left  Kanauj,  and  established  himself  at  Khor,  where 
the  family  remained  for  many  generations.  There  Jaideo,  fourteenth  in 
descent  from  Jaipal,  was  attacked  by  Altamsh,  and  driven  out  after  a  siege  of 
twelve  years.  Eight  generations  later  Karan  Singh  settled  in  the  district  of 
Budaun.  His  great-grandson,  Raja  Pratap  Rudra,  received  a  grant  of  terri- 
tory from  the  Nawab  of  Farukhabad  for  assisting  him  against  the  Rohillas ; 
and  subsequently  the  Raja  Ramsahai,  twenty-eighth  in  descent  from  Jaipal, 
established  the  family  residence  at  Rampur  in  Etah,  where  it  still  remains. 
At  the  time  of  the  cession  of  the  territories  of  the  Nawab  to  the  British, 
Nawal  Singh  was  the  Raja  of  Rampur,  and  his  grandson,  the  late  Raja  Ram 
Chandra  Singh,  was  the  husband  of  the  present  Rani.  He  died  on  2oth 
May  1883,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  widow.  The  Rani  has  a  grandson  and 
heir,  named  Lai  Jagmohan  Singh,  born  in  1877. 

Residence. — Azamnagar,  Etah,  North-Western  Provinces. 

KISHAN  PARTAB  BAHADUR  SAHAI  (of  Tamkuhi),  Rdjd. 

Born  1848.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Bhuinhar  Rajput 
family,  claiming  descent  from  Mayur  Bhat,  more  than  a  hundred  generations 
back.  A  descendant,  named  Raja  Fateh  Sahai,  Bhuinhar  Raja  of  Hoshidr- 
pur  in  Saran,  after  the  battle  of  Baksar  in  1764,  was  driven  from  his  Raj  by 
the  troops  of  the  East  India  Company,  and  settled  on  the  Tamkuhi  estates, 
previously  purchased  by  him,  in  Gorakhpur.  Raja  Fateh  Sahai's  grandson 
was  the  father  of  the  present  Raja,  and  obtained  from  the  British  Govern- 
ment the  recognition  of  his  title  as  hereditary.  The  Raja  has  a  son  and 
heir,  named  Kunwar  Satrajit  Partab  Bahadur  Sahai,  born  27th  July  1864. 

Residence. — Tamkuhi,  Gorakhpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 

s 


258  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KISHAN  SINGH  (of  Bad),  Mian. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  family,  descended  from 
Raja  Indar  Singh,  who  ruled  in  Shahpur  in  the  Kangra  district.  He  married 
a  daughter  of  the  Katoch  Raja  of  Kangra  (see  Jai  Chand,  Raja  of  Lamba- 
graon,  Kangra),  whither  he  fled  when  driven  out  of  his  own  territory  by  Raja 
Pirthi  Singh;  and  his  grandson,  Mian  Ishri  Singh,  father  of  the  present 
Mian,  obtained  a  considerable  jdgir  from  the  Raja  Sansar  Chand  of  Kangra, 
son  of  Raja  Tegh  Chand.  Ishri  Singh's  sister  was  married  to  the  Jammu 
Raja,  Dhian  Singh. 

Residence. — Rai,  Kdngra,  Punjab. 

KISHAN  SINGH,  Sarddr. 

Born  1847.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  (Sikh)  family, 
descended  from  the  Sardar  Gurbakhsh  Singh,  who  acquired  some  territory  in 
the  Ambala  district  by  conquest  in  1759  A. D.  The  representatives  of  the 
family  rendered  good  service  during  the  first  Sikh  war  of  1845-46,  and  also 
at  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  in  1857. 

Residence. — Arabia,  Punjab. 

KISHAN  SINGH,  MILMYAL,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1 3th  August  1850.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i2th  December 
1884,  in  recognition  of  his  remarkable  services  to  the  State,  and  to  science, 
as  an  explorer  in  Nepal,  Great  Tibet,  Mongolia,  and  elsewhere.  Belongs  to 
a  Rajburah  family  of  Rajputs  long  settled  in  Kumaun,  who,  during  the  rule 
of  the  Chands  and  Gurkhas  there,  held  lease  of  the  Parganas  of  Johar  and 
Dhanpur.  In  1812  his  father,  Deo  Singh,  procured  the  release  of  two 
British  subjects  from  Tibet.  The  Rai  Bahadur  has  been  deputed  on  explora- 
tion duty  four  times ;  and  has  received  honours  from  the  Royal  Geographical 
Society,  and  the  Geographical  Society  of  France,  as  well  as  substantial 
rewards  from  the  Government. 

Residence. — Kumdun,  North- Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  259 


KISHANGARH,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAJ-ADHIRAJ 

SARDUL  SINGH  BAHADUR,  G.C.I.E.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  loth  December  1857;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  25th  December  1879. 
Is  one  of  the  Chiefs  of  the  great  Rahtor  clan  of  Rajputs  (see  Jodhpur),  and 

belongs  to  the  Kishansinghot  sept  or 
sub-clan,  so-called  from  Kishan  Singh, 
who  was  the  founder  of  this  State  and 
city,  and  was  the  second  of  the  twelve 
sons  of  Raja  Udai  Singh  of  Jodhpur, 
nicknamed  Mota  Rdjd  (the  Fat  Raja) 
by  the  Emperor  Akbar.  His  Highness 
is  a  Hindu  of  the  Ballabhkul  Vaish- 
nava  sect,  and  was  the  son  and  successor 
of  the  late  Maharaja  Pirthi  Singh. 
He  was  married  in  1870  A.D.  to  the 
eldest  daughter  of  the  Maharao  Umed 
Singhji  of  Sirohi,  and  on  ist  January 
1892  was  created  a  Knight  Grand 
Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire.  His  High- 
ness has  only  one  son,  the  Maharaj-Kunwar  Madan  Singh,  born  2nd 
November  1884,  who  is  now  the  heir-apparent,  as  in  March  1880  the  Maha- 
raja had  the  sorrow  of  losing  an  elder  son  when  only  five  years  old.  The 
Maharaja  has  two  younger  brothers — Maharaj  Jawan  Singhji,  and  Maharaj 
Raghunath  Singhji.  The  families  most  nearly  related  to  His  Highness  are  the 
Rdjwin  (or  royal)  family  groups  of  Fatehgarh  and  Ralaota,  which  are,  how- 
ever, connected  with  him  only  in  the  seventh  and  eighth  degree  of  relation- 
ship respectively.  As  descendant  of  the  Mota  Raja,  Udai  Singh  of  Jodhpur, 
the  Maharaja  has  sub-clan  relationship  with  the  Chiefs  of  Jodhpur  and 
Bikaner  in  Rajputana ;  Ratlam,  Jhabua,  Sailana,  Sitamau,  and  other  Rdhtor 
chiefs  in  Central  India ;  and  Idar  in  Gujarat.  By  marriage  His  Highness  is 
related  to  all  the  other  great  Rajput  Houses,  being  himself  the  head  of  one  of 
the  greatest  and  most  illustrious ;  viz.,  with  the  Sesodias  of  Udaipur  and 
Partabgarh,  with  the  Kachhwahas  of  Jaipur  and  Alwar,  the  Kara  houses  of 
Bundi  and  Kotah,  the  Bhatis  of  Jaisalmir,  and  the  Jhalas  and  Shekhawats. 
Among  the  more  important  of  these  matrimonial  connections,  which  are 
interesting  as  illustrating  the  inter-marriages  of  the  most  illustrious  Rajput 
Houses,  may  be  mentioned  the  following : — 

With  the  Sesodias  of  Udaipur  (the  family  of"  The  Sun  of  the  Hindus"). 

1.  His   Highness's    grandmother  (widow  of  the    Maha'raja"    Mokham 
Singh   of  Kishangarh)   is  a  daughter  of  the  Maha'ra'na"  Amar  Singhji  of 
Udaipur. 

2.  His  Highness's  eldest  sister  is  Dowager  Maha'ra'ni  of  Udaipur,  being 
a  widow  of  the  late  Maha"ra"na"  Sajan  Singhji. 

3.  His  Highness's  son  and  heir-apparent,  the  Maha'raj-Kunwa'r  Madan 
Singh,  has  been  recently  betrothed  to  the  fourth  daughter  of  His  High- 
ness the  present  Maha'ra'na"  Fateh  Singhji. 

The  Kachhwahas  of  Jaipur. 

His  Highness's  third  sister  is  married  to  the  present  Maha'raja"   Sawai 
Madho  Singhji,  Chief  of  Jaipur,  and  is  the  Maha'ra'ni  of  Jaipur. 


260  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

The  Kachhwdhas  of  Alwar. 

His  Highness's  second  sister  was  married  to  the  late  lamented  Maha"- 

ra"j£  Mangal  Singhji,  late  Chief  of  Alwar,  and  was  the  (P£t)  head  Maha"- 

rdni  of  Alwar. 
The  Haras  of  Bundi . 

1.  The  late  Maha"ra"ja"  Ramsingh  of  Bundi's  mother  was  a  Kishangarh 
Princess. 

2.  His    Highness's   niece,   a  daughter  of  Maha'ra'j  Jawan  Singhji,  has 
been  recently  betrothed  to  the  younger  brother  of  the  present  Mahdraja" 
of  Bundi. 

Thejhdlds  ofjhdldwdr. 

His  Highness's  fourth  and  youngest  sister  is  married  to  the  Mahdraj 
Rdna  Zalim  Singhji,  present  Chief  of  Jha"la"wa~r,  and  is  the  (P£t)  head 
Maha'ra'ni  of  Jhalawdr. 

To  the  above  may  be  added  that  His  Highness's  mother  was  a  Princess 
of  the  "  Ranawat  "  (Sesodia)  clan,  being  a  daughter  of  the  late  Raja  Dhiraj 
Madho  Singhji  of  Shahpura.  In  addition  to  the  titles  given  above,  formally 
recognised  by  the  Government  as  belonging  to  the  Maharaja  of  Kishangarh, 
His  Highness  also  bears  those  of  Umdai  Rajhai  and  Buland  Makan.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  724  square  miles;  its  population  is  112,633,  chiefly 
Hindus,  but  including  8492  Muhammadans  and  6295  Jains.  The  Maha- 
raja maintains  a  military  force  of  499  cavalry,  2000  infantry,  and  51  guns; 
and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  15  guns. 

Arms. — Argent,  three  towers  proper,  two  and  one ;  in  chief  a  Barry  of 
5 — gules,  vert,  argent,  aztire,  or.  [This  is  the  Rajput  Pancharanga,  see  Jaipur.] 
Supporters. — Two  horses.  Crest. — A  falcon  rising,  proper.  [This  is  the 
sacred  Garur,  the  cognisance  of  the  Rahtor  Rajputs,  see  Jodhpur.]  Motto. — 
The  Hindi  words  Niti  Riti,  meaning  "  Law  and  Usage." 

Residence. — Kishangarh,  Rajputdna. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  261 


KISHOR  SINGH  (of  Fatehpur),  Rdjd. 

Born  i st  August  1834;  succeeded  his  father  i6th  March  1861.  The 
title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  granted  by  the  Raja  Kamal  Nain, 
Raj  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla.  Belongs  to  an  ancient  Raj  Gond  family,  that 
claims  an  antiquity  of  more  than  900  years  in  their  present  jdgir  of  Fateh- 
pur. The  tradition  in  the  family  is  that  the  jdgir  was  granted  to  them  in 
939  A.D.  An  ancient  sanad'm  the  possession  of  the  Raja  records  the  grant 
(or  possibly  the  confirmation)  of  the  jdgir  to  the  family  by  the  Raj  Gond 
Raja  of  Mandla  in  1500  A.D.  The  Raja  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and  has 
two  sons — Lai  Thakur  Singh  and  Lai  Mahip  Singh. 

Residence. — Fatehpur,  Hoshangabad,  Central  Provinces. 

KISHOR  SINGH  (of  Chamari),  Rao. 

Born  1840.  The  title  is  hereditary,  and  the  Raos  of  Chamari  formerly 
held  great  possessions  in  the  Sagar  district.  The  title  was  originally  con- 
ferred by  the  Raja  Mori  Pahludh  of  Chanderi,  andj  has  been  recognised  by 
the  British  Government.  The  Rao  has  two  sons,  the  elder  (who  has  the 
courtesy  title  of  Diwan)  being  Diwan  Parichhat  Singh  Jangjit,  and  the 
younger  being  Jujhar  Singh. 

Residence. — Chamdri,  Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

KODB  NARAYANASWAMI  NAYUDU,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1846.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February 
1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty.  Entered  the  Government 'service  in  1874;  has  rendered  good 
service  both  in  the  Central  Provinces  and  in  Madras.  During  the  Rumpa 
and  Gudiem  disturbances,  1879-86,  served  with  much  distinction  in  the 
Madras  Police,  and  again  in  the  Golugonda  Hill  disturbances  of  1891. 

Residence. — Vizianagram,  Vizagapatam,  Madras. 


262  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KOLHAPUR,  HIS  HIGHNESS  SHAHU  CHHATRAPATI 
MAHARAJ,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1875  i  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  on  i7th  March  1884.  Is 
a  descendant  of  the  Mahratta  family  of  Sivaji  the  Great,  the  founder  of  the 
Mahrafta  Empire,  being  descended  from  Raja  Ram,  his  second  son,  and 
husband  of  the  famous  Tara  Bai.  Sivaji's  elder  son  Sambhaji  was  taken 
prisoner  by  the  Emperor  Aurangzeb,  and  ultimately  executed ;  and  his  son 
Shahu  was  long  detained  in  prison  by  the  Mughals,  but  obtained  his  liberty 
in  1707,  fixed  his  capital  at  Satara,  and  asserted  his  rights  as  the  heir  of 
his  grandfather  Sivaji.  Meanwhile  Raja  Ram  had  died,  and  his  widow,  Tara 
Bai,  a  woman  of  great  ability  and  courage,  assumed  the  administration  of 
Kolhapur  in  the  name  of  her  elder  son  Sivaji  II.,  who  was  an  idiot  child  of  ten 
years,  and  proclaimed  him  Raja  of  the  Mahrattas.  The  latter  died  in  1712, 
when  his  half-brother  Sambhaji  (son  of  Raja  Ram  by  another  wife)  succeeded 
him,  and  removed  Tara  Bai  from  the  administration.  The  contending 
claims  of  Shahu,  Raja  of  Satara,  and  Sambhaji,  Raja  of  Kolhapur,  were  at 
length  settled  in  1731,  when  precedence  was  surrendered  to  Satara,  and  the 
independence  of  Kolhapur  acknowledged.  In  1 8 1 1  a  treaty  with  the  British 
Power  was  concluded,  by  which  Kolhapur  became  a  feudatory ;  and  as  the 
Raja  remained  faithful  to  the  British  cause  in  the  war  against  the  Peshwa  in 
181 7,  he  received  some  additional  territory.  A  descendant,  Sivaji  III.,  died  in 
1866,  and  on  his  deathbed  was  allowed  to  adopt  his  sister's  son,  Raja  Ram. 
In  1870  Raja  Ram  visited  Europe,  and  died  at  Florence  on  his  return 
journey.  His  adopted  son  was  Sivaji  Maharaja  Chhatrapati  IV.,  who  was 
made  a  Knight  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India.  He  became 
insane,  and  the  Government  appointed  a  relative,  the  Chief  of  Kagal,  as 
Regent.  Sivaji  IV.  died  in  December  1883,  and  was  succeeded,  by  adop- 
tion, by  His  Highness  the  present  Raja,  who  was  the  eldest  son  of  the 
Regent.  The  area  of  the  State  is  2816  square  miles;  and  its  population  is 
800,189,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  33,022  Muhammadans  and  46,732 
Jains.  The  Raja  has  eleven  feudatory  Chiefs  subordinate  to  him,  of  whom 
the  most  important  are  those  of  Vithdlgarh,  Bdvda,  Kapshi,  Kagal,  Ichal- 
karanji  Torgal,  and  Datva.  His  Highness,  with  his  feudatories,  maintains  a 
military  force  of  255  cavalry,  1902  infantry,  and  67  guns;  and  is  entitled  to 
a  salute  of  19  guns. 

Residence. — Kolhdpur,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  263 


KONDKA,  MAHANT  SHAM  KISHOR  DAS,  Mahant  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1838;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i3th  December  1887.  Belongs  to 
a  Bairagi  (Hindu)  family  of  Mahants^  or  Chief  Priests,  the  regulations  of  his 
order  permitting  marriage.  The  area  of  the  State  is  174  square  miles;  its 
population  is  32,979,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Kondka,  Raipur,  Central  Provinces. 

KOREA,  RAJA  PRAN  SINGH  DEO,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1857  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  4th  April  1864  as  a  minor.  Belongs 
to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  a  Chauhan  Rajput  Chief 
named  Dhawal  Singh,  who  came  to  Korea  from  Rajputana  about  600  years 
ago,  and  conquered  the  country.  The  title  of  Raja  is  hereditary  in  the 
family  from  early  times,  and  was  formally  conferred  by  the  British  Govern- 
ment in  1875.  The  area  of  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Chota  Nagpur 
Tributary  Mahals)  is  1631  square  miles;  and  its  population  is  29,846, chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — Korea,  Mdnbhum,  Chota  Ndgpur,  Bengal. 


264  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KOTAH,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAO  UMED  SINGH 

BAHADUR,  Mahdrao  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1873;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  nth  June  1889.  Like  His  High- 
ness the  Maharao  Raja  of  Bundi,  the  Maharao  is  one  of  the  chiefs  of  the 
Hara  sept  of  the  great  Chauhan  clan  of  Rajputs — Kotah  forming  with  Bundi 
the  tract  known  for  centuries  as  Haraoti,  after  the  name  of  that  sept.  Is 
descended  from  Madhu  Singh,  the  second  son  of  the  Rao  Ratan  of  Bundi, 
who  about  the  year  1625  A.D.  was  granted  the  feudatory  Chiefship  of  Kotah 
and  its  dependencies,  for  his  services  to  the  Emperor  Jahangir  against  his  re- 
bellious son,  who  afterwards  became  the  Emperor  Shah  Jahan.  Similar  services 
to  the  latter  Emperor  were  rendered  by  Madhu  Singh's  son  and  successor, 
Mokand  Singh ;  who,  with  three  of  his  brothers,  fell  in  a  battle  at  Ujjain 
against  Shah  Jahan's  rebellious  son,  who  afterwards  became  the  Emperor 
Aurangzeb.  Mokand  Singh  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Jagat  Singh.  Early 
in  the  present  century,  Kotah,  greatly  weakened  by  intestine  dissensions,  was 
attacked  by  Jaipur  and  by  the  Mahrattas,  to  whom  it  became  tributary.  It 
was  only  saved  from  ruin  by  the  extraordinary  abilities  of  its  great  Minister, 
Zalim  Singh,  to  whom  the  Maharao  gave  up  the  active  task  of  ruling  the 
State.  During  a  Ministry  of  forty-five  years  Zalim  Singh  raised  the  State  of 
Kotah  to  great  prosperity  Ultimately,  in  1838,  it  was  arranged  that  Zalim 
Singh's  descendants  should  receive  independent  charge  of  a  part  of  the  State, 
as  feudatories  of  the  Empire ;  and  this  part  became  a  separate  Principality, 
under  the  name  of  Jhalawar  (q.v.)  The  late  Maharao,  Chhatra  Sal  Singh, 
succeeded  his  father  in  1866;  and  on  his  death  in  1889  was  succeeded  by 
his  adopted  son,  the  present  Maharao,  as  a  minor.  His  Highness  is  at 
present  a  student  in  the  Mayo  College,  Ajmir ;  he  is  as  yet  unmarried,  but 
is  betrothed  to  a  daughter  of  His  Highness  the  Maharana  of  Udaipur,  which 
is  the  most  illustrious  marriage  that  can  be  made  by  a  Hindu  Prince.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  3797  square  miles;  its  population  is  517,275,  chiefly 
Hindus,  but  including  32,866  Muhammadans  and  4750  Jains.  His  Highness 
maintains  a  military  force  of  949  cavalry,  5756  infantry,  and  148  guns,  and  is 
entitled  to  a  salute  of  17  guns.  The  family  banner  is  orange  in  colour, 
displaying  a  figure  of  the  Garur  or  sacred  falcon  of  the  Hara  Rajputs. 

Residence. — Kotah,  Rajputdna. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  265 


KOTHARIA,  JAREJA  JBTHIJI,  Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1828  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  8th  January  1857.  The  State,  which 
is  tributary  to  the  Nawab  of  Junagarh,  has  an  area  of  6  square  miles,  and 
a  population  of  2366,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Chief  maintains  a  military  force 
of  4  cavalry  and  38  infantry. 

Residence. — Kothdria,  Kdthia"wa~r. 

KOTHI,  RAJA  BAHADUR  BHAGWAT  BAHADUR  SINGH, 

Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1852;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  June  1887.  Belongs  to  a 
Baghel  Rajput  family  (Hindu) ;  his  father  was  Raja  Ran  Bahadur  Singh ; 
and  the  family  have  been  seated  in  Kothi  for  a  great  many  years,  and 
were  confirmed  in  possession  by  the  British  Government.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  90  square  miles;  its  population  is  18,386,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Raja  maintains  a  military  force  of  35  cavalry,  210  infantry,  and  4  guns. 

Residence. — Kothi,  Baghelkhand,  Central  India. 

KOTHIDB,  BHUMIA  MOTI  SINGH,  Bhumia  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born    1850;    succeeded  to  the  gadi  in    1860.     Belongs  to  a  Bhilala 
family.     The  population  of  the  State  is  about  500. 
Residence. — Kothide,  Bhopdwar,  Central  India. 

KOTI,    Chief  of. 

Is  a  feudatory  of  the  Raja  of  Keonthal  (<?.v.),  and  rules  over  one  of  the 
Simla  Hill  States. 

Residence. — Koti,  Simla  Hills,'  Punjab. 


KOTRA  SANGANI,  THAKUR  MULVAJI  TOGAJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1873;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  23rd  November  1887. 
Belongs  to  a  Jareja  Rajput  family.  The  area  of  his  State  is  74  square 
miles;  its  population  is  8642,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Thdkur  maintains  a 
military  force  of  8  cavalry,  142  infantry,  and  4  guns. 

Residence — Kotra  Sangani,  Ka"thia~war. 


KOTTAYAM,  KERALA  VARMA  RAJA,  Valiya  Rdjd  of. 
Born   1842.     Belongs  to  a  family  that  claims  to  be  of  Kshatriya  origin, 
and  to  have  come  from    the    east  and  acquired    sovereignty  in    Wainad. 
Subsequently  they  appear  to  have  acquired  some  territory  from  the  Raja  t)f 


266  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Chitrakal  in  Malabar,  either  by  a  gift  or  in  war.  On  Haidar's  invasion  of 
Malabar  the  Raja  and  all  his  family  fled  to  Travancore ;  returned  in  1782, 
but  fled  to  Travancore  a  second  time  on  Tippu's  invasion  in  1789,  and  died 
there.  The  family,  like  that  of  the  Zamorin  of  Calicut  and  other  Chiefs  of 
Malabar,  follows  the  Marumakkatayam  law  of  inheritance,  by  which  the 
succession  is  to  the  offspring  of  its  female  members,  among  whom  the  next 
eldest  male  after  the  Raja  is  his  heir-apparent.  The  late  Valiya  Raja  of 
Kottayam  was  called  Shangara  Varma  Raja ;  and  he  was  succeeded  by  the 
present  Valiya  Raja  under  the  Marumakkatayam  law.  He  receives  an 
allowance  from  Government  in  compensation  for  the  estate  that  belonged 
to  his  ancestors. 

Residence. — Malabar,  Madras. 

KOURE  KHAN,  JATOI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Honorary  Magistrate  of  Muzaffargarh.     Created  a   Khan  Bahadur,  as  a 
personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — Muzaffargarh,  Punjab. 

KRISHAN  DATT  RAM  (of  Singha  Chanda),  Raja. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  recognised  in  1877. 
Residence. — Gonda,  Oudh. 

KRISHNA  CHANDAR  RAI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  in  1823.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  July 
1885,  "for  long  and  meritorious  service  under  Government."  The  Rai 
Bahadur  rendered  excellent  service  as  Deputy-Magistrate  and  Deputy-Collector 
of  Diamond  Harbour.  Belongs  to  an  old  Baidya  family,  formerly  of  Mur- 
shidabad,  now  settled  in  the  Dacca  district,  and  known  as  the  Baira  Rais ; 
descended  from  Sri  Chandra  Rai,  who  served  under  the  Nawab  Shaista 
Khan,  and  received  from  him  a  khilat.  Educated  at  *  Dacca  College ; 
appointed  to  the  service  of  the  Government  of  Bengal  in  1841.  Is  an 
Honorary  Presidency  Magistrate  of  Calcutta,  Vice-President  of  the  East 
Bengal  Association,  etc.  He  has  five  sons — Lalit  Chandra  Rai,  physician, 
born  1852  ;  Vipina  Chandra  Rai,  D.L.,  of  the  Judicial  Service,  born  1854; 
Hem  Chandra  Rai,  M.A.,  B.L.,  born  1864;  Sarat  Chandra  Rai,  B.L.,  born 
1867  ;  Gnan  Chandra  Rai,  B.A.,  born  1870. 

Residence. — Baira,  Mdnikganj,  Dacca,  Bengal. 

KRISHNA  NATH,  PANDIT,  NYAYAPANCHANANA, 
Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  was  conferred,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  24th  May  1892, 
in  recognition  of  his  eminence  as  a  Sanskrit  Scholar.  It  entitles  him  to 
take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas.  The  title  Nydyapan- 
chdnana  is  a  literary  title  or  degree,  conferred  by  the  learned  Pandits  of  the 
Sanskrit  University  of  Navadwipa  or  Nadiya,  and  refers  to  proficiency 
in  the  Nydya  school  of  logic. 

Residence. — Purbasthali,  Nadiya",  Bengal. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  267 


KRISHNA  PERTAP  SINGH  SAHI,  K.C.I.B.  (of  Hutwa), 
Maharaja  Bahadur.     See  Hatwa. 

KRISHNA  SAH,  LALA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1 8th  March  1856.  The  title  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  in  recognition  of  his  services  as  an  Honorary 
Magistrate  and  Member  of  the  Municipal  Commission  of  Nainital.  Is  the 
son  of  the  late  Lala  Moti  Ram  Sah,  the  well-known  banker,  who  rendered 
distinguished  services  to  the  Government  in  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  in  1857, 
and  received  a  handsome  reward  for  them.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  family  of 
the  North- Western  Provinces. 

Residence. — Nainita"!,  North- Western  Provinces. 

KRISHNA  SAHAI,  LALA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  2nd  April  1824.  The  title  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888,  as 
a  personal  distinction,  in  recognition  of  his  services  as  an  Honorary  Magistrate 
and  Member  of  the  District  Board  of  Meerut.  The  family  has  from  time 
immemorial  been  bankers  and  landowners  in  the  North-Western  Provinces. 

Residence. — Meerut,  North-Western  Provinces. 

KRISHNA  SINGH,  PANDIT  (Thakur  of  Bhoar),  Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890,  for 
eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar 
immediately  after  titular  Rajas. 

Residence. — Bhoar,  Madhubani,  Darbhanga,  Bengal. 

KRISHNAJI  LAKSHMAN  NALKAR,   C.I.E.,   The  Hon. 

A  Member  •  of  the  Viceroy's  Legislative  Council.  Was  created  a 
Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  ist  January 
1888. 

Residence.- — Calcutta. 

KRISHNALAL  OCHAVRAM,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  July  1886. 
Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 

KRISHNARAO  GAJANAND,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  July  1886. 
Residence. — Ratnagiri,  Bombay. 

KRISHNARAO  MALHARRAO,   Vishwasrao. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Kha"ndesh,  Bombay. 


268  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KEISTBNDRA  RAI  (of  Bolihar),  Rdjd  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  as  a  personal  distinction, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Majesty.  He  belongs  to 
an  old  Kulin  Brahman  family,  originally  called  Sanyal,  and  long  settled  at 
Bolihar  in  the  district  of  Rajshahi,  Bengal.  Is  descended  from  Ram  Rai 
Sdnyal,  whose  grandson  was  Ram  Chandra  Rai.  His  grandson  was  the  Raja 
Rajendra  Rai,  whose  adopted  son  was  the  Raja  Shiva  Prasad  Rai,  father  of 
the  present  Raja  Bahadur.  He  rendered  good  service  to  the  Government 
during  the  scarcity  of  1874. 

Residence. — Bolihar,  Rajshdhi,  Bengal. 

KRISTO  CHANDAR  GHOSH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was   conferred  on   ist  June   1888,  for  good 
service  in  the  Opium  Department. 
Residence. — Bankipur,  Bengal. 

KSHETRA  CHANDRA  ADITYA,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  Rai  Bahadur  has  rendered  good  service  in  the  Military  Accounts 
Department,  and  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th 
May  1892. 

Residence. — Simla. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  269 


KUCH  BBHAR,  LIEUT.  -  COLONEL  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHA- 
RAJA SIR  NRIPENDRA  NARAYAN  BHUP  BAHADUR, 
GKC.I.E.,  Maharaja  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  4th  October  1862;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Maharaja 
Narendra  Narayan  Bhup  Bahadur,  in  August  1863.  Belongs  to  a  Kochi 
family  that  has  held  uninterrupted  sovereignty  for  the  last  382  years  in  this 
territory,  since  their  first  settlement  in  the  plains;  from  which  family  also 
descend  the  Bijni  and  Darung  Houses  of  Assam,  the  Raikats  of  Baikanthapur 
(g.v.)  in  Jalpaiguri,  and  the  Panga  family  in  Rangpur.  His  Highness  was 
educated,  first^  in  the  Wards  Institute  at  Benares  ;  secondly,  under  the  guardian- 
ship of  Mr.  H.  St.  J.  Kneller,  in  the  Bankipur  College,  Patna,  and  next  as  a 
Law  Student  in  the  Presidency  College,  Calcutta.  During  his  minority  the 
State  rendered  good  service  in  the  Bhutan  war  1863-65,  for  which  two 
guns  were  presented  to  His  Highness  by  the  British  Government.  Was 
presented  with  medal  and  sword  in  1877  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  at 
Delhi,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India.  Married,  in  March  1878,  the  eldest  daughter  of  the 
famous  Reformer,  Kesub  Chander  Sen.  Was  sent  to  England  the  same  year 
to  complete  his  education,  under  the  joint  guardianship  of  Surgeon -Major 
(now  Sir)  Benjamin  Simpson  and  Mr.  Kneller.  Returned  to  India. in  the 
spring  of  1879,  and  was  formally  installed  on  his  ancestral  gadi  on  the  8th 
November  1883,  by  the  Lieutenant  -  Governor  of  Bengal.  The  titles  of 
Maharaja  Bhup.  Bahadur  were  recognised  as  hereditary  by  the  Government 
of  India  in  1885.  His  Highness  was  appointed  Honorary  Major  in  the 
British  Army  in  the  same  year.  He  visited  England  in  the  Jubilee  year 
1887,  to  take  part  in  the  rejoicings  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the 
reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty,  with  the  Maharam  and  children,  and 
was  invested  with  the  Insignia  of  Grand  Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent 
Order  of  the  Indian  Empire  by  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  the  Queen 
Empress  herself,  the  Maharani  being  invested  with  the  Imperial  Order  of  the 
Crown  of  India  in  the  same  year.  Was  made  Honorary  Aide-de-camp  to 
His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales,  with  the  rank  of  Lieutenant-Colonel 
in  the  British  Army.  The  Maharaja  in  1888  established  the  Brahmo  Somaj 
or  the  Reformed  Church  in  the  State  of  Kuch  Behar.  He  founded  the 
Victoria  College  for  higher  education  therein,  and  granted  a  long  term 
settlement  of  revenue  to  his  subjects  for  thirty  years,  assessments  being 
made  on  the  most  approved  principles.  His  Highness  established  the  India 
Club  at  Calcutta  in  1882,  founded  Nripendra  Narayan  Hall  at  Jalpaiguri  in 
1883,  and  presented  house  and  lands  at  Darjiling,  wherewith  the  Lewis 
Jubilee  Sanitarium  was  started  at  that  station  in  1887,  and  established  the 
"Anandamayi  Dharmasala"  (almshouse)  in  1889.  The  Maharaja's  age  is 
now  thirty,  and  he  has  issue,  four  sons  and  two  daughters.  While  in 
England  in  1887  he  received  the  distinguished  masonic  honour  of  Past 
Grand  Senior  Warden  of  England  at  the  hands  of  the  Most  Worshipful  the 
Grand  Master,  made  District  Grand  Master  of  Bengal  in  1890,  installed 
District  Grand  Mark  Master  of  Bengal,  1891. 

The  area  of  the  State  is  1307  square  miles;  its  population  is  602,624, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  174,539  Muhammadans.  His  Highness  main- 


270 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


tains  a  military  force  of  9  cavalry,  176  infantry,  and  4  guns,  and  is  entitled 
to  a  salute  of  13  guns.  The  ancestral  banner  of  the  family  displays  a  sword 
and  a  blade  of  grass  (with  which,  according  to  tradition,  one  of  the  Maharaja's 
ancestors  cut  off  the  head  of  an  enemy  as  an  offering  to  the  Goddess  Kali). 
The  supporters  are  a  tiger  and  an  elephant.  The  crest  is  a  "  Hanuman," 
holding  a  club  in  each  hand. 

Residences. — Kuch  Behar,  Bengal ;  Calcutta  ;  Darjiling. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  271 

KUDRAT  AZIZ.     See  Muhammad  Kudrat  Aziz. 

KUDRAT-ULLA,  SHAIKH,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred,  on  i2th  October  1860. 
Residence. — Birbhum,  Bengal. 


KUMARA  VENKATA  PERUMAL  RAZ  (of  Karvetnagar),  Raja. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  in  the  family  from  early  times,  and 
confirmed  by  the  British  Government  in  1802.  Is  the  son  of  the  late  Raja 
of  Karvetnagar,  Raja  Kumara  Bomma  Raz.  Belongs  to  a  family  that  was 
called  the  Bomma  Raz  (or  "  Bomrauze  ")  family,  that  rose  to  power  in  the 
district  of  North  Arcot  about  200  years  ago,  in  consequence  of  the  decline  of 
the  Vijayanagar  dynasty.  The  family  cognisance  is  a  white  flag  with  the 
device  of  a  boar  on  its  field ;  the  family  motto,  borne  on  its  seal,  is  Kdrvet- 
nagar  Venugopdlaswdmi  Sahdyam,  meaning  "May  Venugopalaswami — the 
deity  of  Karvetnagar — assist." 

Residence. — Karvetnagar,  North  Arcot,  Madras. 


KUMHARSAIN,  RANA  HIRA  SINGH,  Rand  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Bom  1851 ;  succeeded  to  \hzgadi  i2th  November  1874.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  family,  whose  founder,  Kirat  Singh,  came  from  Gaya  about  1000  A.D., 
and  acquired  possession  of  the  State  by  conquest.  The  State,  formerly  a 
feudatory  of  Bashahr,  was  taken  under  direct  British  protection  after  the 
expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas  in  1 8 1 5,  by  a  sanad  dated  February  1 8 1 6.  Rana 
Kehr  Singh  died  without  issue  in  1839,  and  in  consideration  of  his  early 
attachment  to  British  interests  during  the  Gurkha  war,  the  Government 
confirmed  the  State  to  a  collateral  heir  of  the  family  named  Rana  Pritam 
Singh.  His  successor  was  the  Rana  Bhawani  Singh,  who  was  succeeded  in 
1874  by  the  present  Rana,  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the  Simla 
Hill  States,  is  94  square  miles;  its  population  is  9515,  chiefly  Hindus.  The 
Rana  maintains  a  military  force  of  45  infantry  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Kumharsain,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


KUMUD  KRISHNA  SINGH  (of  Susang),  Mahdrdjd. 
See  Susang,  Mahdrdjd  of. 

KUN  KYI  (SAWBWA),  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i7th  April  1890.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Mone,  Burma. 


272  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KUNHIAR,  THAKUR  TEGH  SINGH,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1836;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1867.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput 
(Hindu)  family ;  descended  from  Bhoj  Deo,  who  in  early  times  came  from 
Jammu,  and  conquered  this  territory.  The  State  was  overrun  by  the 
Gurkhas  at  the  beginning  of  the  century;  but  on  their  expulsion  by  the 
British  in  1815,  it  was  confirmed  to  Rao  Puran  Deo,  the  then  Thakur,  by  a 
sanad  dated  4th  September  1815.  The  present  Thakur  succeeded  Rao 
Kishan  Singh  on  the  death  of  the  latter  in  1867.  The  area  of  the  State  is 
9  square  miles  ;  its  population  is  1923,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Thakur  has  a 
son  named  Shib  Singh,  and  maintains  a  military  force  of  20  infantry. 

Residence. — Kunhiar,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


KUNJAL  SINGH  (of  BMtgaon),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary.     Belongs  to  a  family  descended  from  Jogi  Rai, 
who  was  the  Diwan  of  Kalyan  Sai,  Raja  of  Ratnapur. 
Residence. — Bhdtgaon,  Bildspur,  Central  Provinces. 


KURANDWAD  (Senior  Branch),  CHINTAMAN  RAO  RAGHU- 

NATH,  alias  BALA  SAHBB  PATWARDHAN,  Chief  of . 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  i4th  February  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  25th  January  1876. 
Belongs  to  a  Konkanasth  Brahman  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from 
Hari  Rath,  of  Kotwadi.  His  descendant,  Trimbak  Rao  of  Kotwadi  in  the 
Konkan,  obtained  Kurandwad  ,in  indm,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 
Nilkanta  Rao,  who  received  the  saranjam  and  the  title  of  Sardar  from  the 
Peshwa.  The  Chief  has  a  son  and  heir  named  Bhalchandra  Rao,  with 
the  title  of  "  Anna  Saheb."  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  in  the  Southern 
Mahratta  country,  is  182  square  miles;  its  population  is  35,187,  chiefly 
Hindus,  but  including  3409  Muhammadans.  The  Chief  maintains  a 
military  force  of  10  cavalry,  164  infantry,  and  2  guns. 

There  are  three  chiefs  of  Kurandwad,  all  of  the  Patwardhan  family,  the 
Bala  Saheb  Patwardhan  being  the  Chief  of  that  division  of  the  State  that  is 
known  as  "  Kurandwad  (senior  branch)/' — being  rather  a  larger  part ;  while 
the  Bapu  Saheb  Patwardhan  and  the  Daji  Saheb  Patwardhan  are  jointly  the 
Chiefs  of  that  part  that  is  known  as  "  Kurandwad  (junior  branch)." 

Residence. — Kurandwad,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 


KURANDWAD  (Junior  Branch),  GANPAT  RAO  HARIHAR, 
alias  BAPU  SAHBB  PATWARDHAN,  Chief  of . 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1839;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  April  1854.  Belongs  to  a 
Konkanasth  Brahman  family  (see  Kurandwad,  senior  branch).  Shares  the 
Chiefship  of  this  State  with  the  Daji  Saheb  Patwardhan.  The  State  has 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  273 

an  area  of  114  square  miles,  and  a  population  of  25,811,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  2548  Muhammadans.  The  Chiefs  maintain  a  military  force  of 
12  cavalry,  306  infantry,  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Kurandwdd,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 


KURANDWAD  (Junior  Branch),  HARIHAR  RAO  VINAYAK, 

alias  DAJI  SAHEB  PATWARDHAN,  Chief  of . 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1852  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  5th  April  1854.  Belongs 
to  a  Konkanasth  Brahman  (Hindu)  family  (see  Kurandwad,  senior  branch). 
Shares  the  Chiefship  of  this  State  with  the  Bapu  Saheb  Patwardhan  (vide  supra). 

Residence. — Kurandwdd,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 

KURWAI,  NAWAB  MUNAWAR  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1869;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i5th  January  1887.  Belongs  to  a 
Pathan  (Muhammadan)  family,  descended  from  Nawab  Dalel  Khdn,  an 
Afghan  leader.  His  descendant,  the  Nawab  Muhammad  Nazaf  Khan, 
succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1858.  Having  rendered  good  service  to  Govern- 
ment, and  being  without  male  issue,  he  was  permitted  to  adopt  his  grandson, 
the  son  of  his  eldest  daughter,  who  is  the  present  Nawab.  The  family 
banner  is  green,  bearing  on  its  field  a  crescent.  The  area  of  the  State  is 
about  140  square  miles;  its  population  is  24,631,  chiefly  Hindus,  but 
including  3609  Muhammadans.  The  Nawab  maintains  a  military  force  of 
12  cavalry,  190  infantry,  and  9  guns. 

Residence. — Kurwai,  Bhopal,  Central  India. 


KUSALPURA,  Thdkur  of.     See  Kassalpura. 


274 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KUTCH,  HIS  HIGHNESS  MAHARAO  SHRI  MIRZA  RAJA 

SAWAI  SIR  KHENGARJI  BAHADUR,  G.C.I.E.,  Rao  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 


KUTCH 


COURAGE-AND-CONFIDENCE 


Born   i6th  August  1867;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  iQth  December  1875. 
Is  Chief  of  the  Jareja  Rajputs,  who  came  to  Kutch  from  Sind  early  in  the 

1 4th  century,  under  the  leadership  of  his 
ancestor,  the  Jam  Lakha  Phulani,  son  of 
Jara,  from  whom  the  clan  takes  its  name. 
Lakha  is  said  to  have  completed  the  con- 
quest of  Kutch  in  the  year  1320  A.D.  His 
descendant,  Khengar,  when  only  a  lad  of 
fourteen,  slew  a  lion  with  his  sword  at  a 
hunting  party  with  the  King  of  Ahmadabad, 
who  was  so  much  pleased  with  this  feat  that 
he  conferred  on  the  young  prince  the 
territory  of  Morvi,  in  the  north  of  Kathiawar, 
with  the  title  of  Rao.  After  this  the  Rao 
Khengar  succeeded  in  making  himself  the 
master  of  the  whole  of  Kutch,  with  the 
city  of  Bhuj  for  his  capital,  in  1548  A.D. 
Khengar's  uncle,  the  Jam  Rawal,  fled  to 

Kathiawar,  and  founded  the  State  of  Nawanagar,  the  rulers  of  which  are  still 
called  Jams.  The  Rao  Khengar  I.  was  succeeded  by  Rao  Bharmal  L, 
during  whose  reign,  fr6m  1585  to  1631  A.D.,  the  government  of  Gujarat 
passed  from  the  Kings  of  Ahmadabad  to  the  Mughal  Emperors.  Bharmal, 
who  was  at  the  head  of  a  large  military  force,  visited  the  Emperor  Jahangir 
in  1617,  and  received  from  him  most  costly  presents,  including  his  own 
horse,  elephants,  dagger,  and  a  sword  with  diamond-mounted  hilt.  A  de- 
scendant, Rao  Lakhpatji,  who  reigned  from  1741  to  1760  A.D.,  set  up  a 
cannon-foundry,  and  introduced  other  manufactures  from  Europe  by  the  aid 
of  an  adventurer  named  Ramsingh ;  and  the  mechanical  skill  and  working  in 
metals,  for  which  the  craftsmen  of  Kutch  are  still  famous,  date  from  this  reign. 
In  1809  the  rulers  of  Kutch  sought  British  help ;  the  Rao  Raidhan  II.  being 
on  the  gadi,  but  the  administration  of  the  State  being  carried  on  by  a  very 
powerful  and  ambitious  Prime  Minister  named  Fatheh  Muhammad.  A  treaty 
was  signed  in  that  year,  and  again  another  in  1812.  In  1813  both  Fatheh 
Muhammad  and  the  Rao  died.  The  latter  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Rao 
Bharmal  II. ;  but  there  was  so  much  disorder  in  the  State  that  the  British 
Power  was  compelled  to  intervene,  and  to  send  troops  into  the  Principality 
in  1816,  and  again  in  1818-19.  On  the  latter  occasion  the  Rao  was 
deposed,  and  his  son,  the  Rao  Desalji  II.,  succeeded  as  a  minor,  and  ruled 
happily  for  more  than  forty  years,  till  1860.  He  took  vigorous  measures  to 
suppress  infanticide,  sati  (or  the  burning  of  widows  on  the  funeral  pile  of 
their  deceased  husbands),  and  the  trade  in  slaves.  On  the  death  of  Rao 
Desalji  in  1860,  the  Government  of  Bombay  thus  recorded  the  official 
appreciation  of  his  career :  "  Marked  by  a  love  of  truth  and  plain  dealing, 
Rao  Desalji  was  probably  more  than  any  one  else  in  Kutch  learned  in  the 
traditions  and  customs  of  the  Province.  He  was  a  careful  and  painstaking 
judge,  and  a  staunch  and  devoted  ally  of  the  British  Government.  With  the 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  275 

help  of  a  few  Chiefs  and  Court  servants  he  managed  the  whole  business  of 
the  country,  and  by  his  knowledge  of  their  character,  friendly  intercourse, 
and  timely  concessions,  avoided  any  struggle  with  the  Jareja  chiefs."  The 
"  Jareja  chiefs  "  referred  to  are  the  Bhdyad — brotherhood  or  frerage  of  the 
ruling  family,  being  all  descendants  of  the  first  Rao.  The  Rao  Desalji  II. 
was  succeeded  by  his  late  Highness  the  Maharao  Pragmalji,  father  of  the 
present  Rao.  During  the  fifteen  years  of  his  rule,  1860  to  1875,  he  showed 
himself  anxious  to  improve  the  management  of  the  State.  He  framed  codes 
for  the  guidance  of  his  officers  in  matters  of  civil  and  criminal  justice,  he 
undertook  works  of  public  usefulness,  and  introduced  State  systems  of  public 
instruction  and  of  vaccination.  In  recognition  of  his  excellent  administra- 
tion he  was  in  1871  honoured  with  the  title  of  Knight  Grand  Commander  of  the 
Star  of  India.  Unlike  his  forefathers,  none  of  whom  left  Kutch,  he  thrice 
visited  Bombay — in  1870  to  meet  His  Royal  Highness  the  Duke  of  Edin- 
burgh, in  1871  to  take  part  in  a  Chapter  of  the  Star  of  India,  and  in  October 
1875  to  meet  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales.  These  happy  visits 
are  marked  by  important  public  works  dedicated  to  their  Royal  Highnesses 
— the  Albert  Edward  Breakwater  and  Harbour  Works  at  Mandvi,  which 
have  cost  over  1 2  lacs  of  rupees,  and  the  Alfred  High  School  at  Bhuj,  the  pro- 
vincial centre  of  education ;  and  the  establishment  of  two  "  Rao  Shri 
Pragmalji  Scholarships  "  in  the  Elphinstone  College,  and  two  in  Sir  Jarhsetji 
Jijibhai's  School  of  Art,  Bombay.  His  Highness  Rao  Pragmalji  was  described 
by  the  British  authorities  as  "  most  enlightened  and  liberal,"  as  well  as  a 
"loyal,  consistent,  and  devoted  friend"  of  the  British  Government.  Rao 
Pragmalji  built  a  palace  at  Bhuj  at  a  cost  of  about  Rs.2o,oo,ooo ;  con- 
structed the  Pragsar  Tank,  which  is  an  immense  reservoir  of  rain  water  in 
the  Chadwa  range  of  hills,  and  a  causeway  in  the  large  Hamirsar  tank ;  he 
also  built  the  Jail  ^3.79,509),  the  Hospital,  the  Horse  and  Elephant 
Stables  (Rs.  1,84,303),  and  the  Schools  at  Bhuj  and  Mandvi;  remitted 
transit  duties,  and  occasionally  remitted  import  duties  in  times  of  scarcity  or 
deficient  rainfall.  He  ordered  out  cotton  gins,  and  introduced  screw  presses, 
and  finished  the  Bhuj-Mandvi  road.  He  was  a  great  sportsman,  and  killed 
many  wild  animals,  including  a  number  of  panthers.  The  total  expenditure 
on  public  works  started  during  His  Highness  Rao  Pragmalji's  reign  amounted 
to  Rs. 3 2, 4 1, 43 5.  He  was  succeeded  in  1876  by  His  Highness  the  present 
Maharaja,  Rao  Khengarji,  who  was  described  at  that  time  by  the  British 
Political  Agent  as  "a  most  promising  boy  of  ten."  In  1877  Sir  Richard 
Temple,  as  Governor  of  Bombay,  visited  the  State,  and  complimented  the 
young  Prince  on  his  general  progress,  and  on  the  accuracy  and  ease  with 
which  he  could  converse  in  English — his  education  having  been  mainly  in 
the  hands  of  M.  Chhotalal  Tewakram  and  Captain  J.  W.  Wray  of  the  Staff 
Corps.  He  was  admitted  into  the  Council  of  Administration,  at  an  unusually 
early  age,  in  1882  ;  and  on  nth  August  1884,  having  attained  his  majority 
of  eighteen  years  of  age,  he  was  invested  with  full  powers  of  State.  On 
1 4th  November  of  that  year  Sir  James  Fergusson,  as  Governor  of  Bombay, 
visited  Bhuj,  and  held  a  grand  Darbar  for  the  purpose  of  formally  installing 
His  Highness,  in  the  name  of  the  Queen  Empress,  as  Rao  of  Kutch.  In 
the  course  of  his  speech  on  that  occasion  Sir  James  Fergusson  said :  "  I 
venture  to  augur  very  favourably  of  His  Highness's  reign.  His  natural  intelli- 
gence has  been  well  developed,  his  mind  has  been  instructed  by  a  liberal 
education,  he  possesses  a  complete  knowledge  of  the  circumstances  and 


276  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

wants  of  his  country  and  people,  but  more  hopeful  still  are  his  disposition 
and  character.  The  frequent  opportunities  which  I  have  had  of  judging  of 
them,  as  well  as  the  unanimous  testimony  of  those  who  have  known  him 
from  childhood,  convince  me  that  he  possesses  a  kind  heart  as  well  as  a  clear 
judgment,  and  cherishes  a  resolute  adherence  to  the  call  of  duty.  These 
qualities  are  not  unknown  to  his  subjects,  and  they  cannot  fail  to  deepen 
their  hereditary  attachment  to  his  family  and  person,  which  is  so  remarkable. 
It  may  indeed  actuate  him  to  deserve  and  reciprocate  it.  I  doubt  not  that 
it  will.  I  shall  deem  myself  very  ignorant  of  character  if  His  Highness  does 
not  realise  our  best  anticipations." 

On  the  2nd  March  1885  a  Darbar  was  held  at  the  Bhuj  Palace  for  the 
investiture  of  His  Highness  with  the  hereditary  distinction  of  "Sawai 
Bahadur,"  conferred  on  the  rulers  of  Kutch  by  the  British  Government.  In 
1887  His  Highness  proceeded  to  England  to  represent  the  Princes  of  the 
Bombay  Presidency  on  the  occasion  of  the  celebration  of  the  Jubilee  of  the 
Queen  Empress,  and  during  his  absence  he  entrusted  his  State  to  his  Diwan, 
Rao  Bahadur  Motilal  Lalbhai. 

Whilst  in  England  His  Highness  was  created  a  Knight  Grand  Com- 
mander of  the  Indian  Empire.  He  takes  a  deep  interest  in  education,  and 
especially  in  the  education  of  women.  He  founded  a  Sanskrit  school  or 
Pathshala,  at  a  cost  of  Rs. 2 5,000,  and  named  it  after  his  mother.  He  also 
founded  the  Fergusson  Museum  and  Library  at  Bhuj,  an  institution  erected 
as  a  memorial  of  the  Governorship  of  Sir  James  Fergusson.  This  last  cost 
Rs.32,ooo.  To  encourage  learning  he  has  founded  various  scholarships  of  more 
or  less  importance,  and  has  also  inaugurated  a  fund  from  which  deserving 
scholars  desirous  to  study  in  England  or  America  can  obtain  their  expenses. 
Among  the  scholarships  for  females  may  be  mentioned  the  one  to  Kutch 
females  attending  the  Grant  Medical  College  in  Bombay,  the  "  Kutch  Barton 
Scholarship  "  to  Kutch  females  attending  the  Training  College  at  Ahmadabad 
or  Rajkot,  scholarships  for  female  assistant-teachers  at  Bhuj,  the  Rao  Shri 
Khengarji  scholarships,  and  one  for  girls  attending  the  High  School  at  Puna. 
For  males  the  Rao  has  founded  -scholarships  for  Kutchis  receiving  scientific 
and  technical  education  in  England,  for  students  receiving  agricultural  or 
other  scientific  education  in  India,  for  Kutchis  attending  the  Veterinary 
College  at  Bombay,  the  Veterinary  School  at  Puna  and  the  College  of  Science 
at  Puna;  also  scholarships  open  to  any  citizen  of  Bombay  attending  the 
Ripon  Technical  School,  Bombay ;  and  further  gives  annual  prizes  for  quali- 
fying for  any  professional  function  in  connection  with  a  mill,  and  for  the  work 
ot  a  captain  of  a  steamer.  It  should  be  mentioned  that  the  scholarships  for 
Kutchis  resident  in  Bombay  alone  were  established  at  a  total  cost  of 
Rs.25,ooo.  As  a  further  stimulus  to  education,  and  especially  with  the 
object  of  encouraging  native  talent  and  spreading  knowledge  amongst  the 
people,  the  Darbar  annually  commissions  competent  persons  to  write  essays 
on  various  subjects,  and  to  translate  standard  English  works  into  the  Gujarati 
language. 

In  the  matter  of  public  works  considerable  improvements  have  been 
effected  within  recent  years  in  connection  with  the  extension  of  roads,  the 
pier  and  reclamation  works,  and  the  erection  of  new  buildings.  Since  the 
accession  of  His  Highness  to  the  gadi  the  expenditure  incurred  by  the  Darbar 
on  works  of  public  utility  has  amounted  to  Rs. 66, 2 4,6 7 2.  • 

Great  attention  is  paid  by  His  Highness  to  well-irrigation,  which  has  been 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  277 

found  by  experience  to  be  most  suited  to  the  peculiar  requirements  of  the 
Province,  the  rainfall  being  limited  and  precarious.  Other  means  of  irriga- 
tion have  also  been  adopted.  Under  his  guidance  strenuous  efforts  have 
also  been  made  in  the  direction  of  reclamation  of  waste  land.  In  the  course 
of  the  last  fifteen  years  the  number  of  acres  of  waste  land  brought  under  the 
plough  amount  to  83,890,  and  fifteen  new  villages  have  been  established. 

His  Highness  is  a  thorough  sportsman,  fond  of  pig-sticking,  shooting,  and 
all  manly  exercises.  He  is,  moreover,  a  firm  though  conciliatory  ruler,  and 
is  regarded  by  his  subjects  with  a  deep  and  ardent  attachment.  He  married 
the  daughters  of  the  Thakur  Saheb  of  Sayla,  and  of  the  Rana  Jalamsinghji, 
cousins  of  His  Highness  the  Raj  Saheb  of  Dhrangadra,  in  Kathiawar  (q.v.\ 
on  ipth  February  1884.  The  occasion  of  this  marriage  was  remarkable  for 
the  substitution  for  the  old  custom  of  giving  Fulekas  (grand  dinners  and  a 
nightly  procession,  according  to  old  practice)  of  a  small  Darbar,  at  which 
nazars  were  paid,  which  His  Highness  touched,  and  remitted  to  be  utilised 
in  furthering  the  cause  of  female  education.  His  sons  are  named — Mad- 
hubha,  otherwise  called  Vijayarajji,  born  2nd  September  1885;  and 
Manubha,  born  i2th  September  1888. 

His  Highness's  brother  is  named  Karansinghji,  born  in  1870,  and 
educated  at  the  Rajkumar  College,  Rajkot ;  he  visited  England  on  the  occa- 
sion of  Her  Majesty's  Jubilee  in  1887,  and  was  then  created  a  Companion  of 
the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  and  married  a  daughter  of 
the  House  of  Aramda,  in  Okha,  Kathiawar,  in  March  1889.  His  Highness's 
sister  was  married  to  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Bikanir  (q.v.},  in  Raj- 
putana. 

The  State  has  an  area  of  6500  square  miles,  exclusive  of  the  Runn  of 
Kutch,  which  is  about  9000  square  miles;  its  population  is  512,084,  chiefly 
Hindus,  but  including  118,797  Muhammadans  and  66,663  Jains.  His 
Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  354  cavalry,  1412  infantry,  and  164 
guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 7  guns. 

Arms. — The  coat  of  arms  adopted  by  His  Highness's  family  is  most  inter- 
esting, as  illustrating  Oriental  heraldry.  The  sketch  given  in  the  margin  is 
taken  from  a  document  kindly  supplied  by  the  Kutch  Darba"r,  and  was  described 
by  His  Excellency  the  Diwdn  of  Kutch  in  1876  in  the  following  words  : — 

"(i)  The  Fort  of  Bhujia,  which  overlooks  the  capital  of  Bhuj.  (2)  The 
Moon,  showing  that  the  reigning  family  belongs  to  the  Lunar  dynasty.  (3) 
The  Crown,  and  the  Jari  Patka  flag  (with  representations  of  the  sun  and  the 
moon),  emblematic  of  royalty.  (4)  The  Mahi  Muratab,  a  flag  with  a  gold-fish 
at  the  top,  presented  to  a  former  Rao  of  Kutch  by  an  Emperor  of  Delhi.  This 
is  considered  a  valued  present,  and  is  carried  in  State  in  all  ceremonials  by 
sowaris  on  the  back  of  an  elephant.  (5)  The  Trident  of  the  family  goddess, 
and  old  weapons  of  the  family.  (6)  A  Boat,  showing  that  Kutch  is  a  maritime 
Power.  (7)  Two  Horsemen,  representing  Kutch  as  a  horse-producing  country, 
and  showing  specimens  of  her  military  retainers.  (8)  A  Cow,  representing  the 
customary  title  of  a  native  potentate.  (9)  A  killed  Tiger,  indicating  the  great 
historical  event  from  which  the  title  of  Rao  was  derived.  (10)  The  Motto 
adopted  by  the  family,  showing  the  attributes  by  which  the  first  Rao  Kheng^r 
succeeded  in  regaining  his  lost  patrimony." 

Residence. — The  Palace,  Bhuj,  Kutch,  Western  India. 


278  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


KUTHAR,  RANA  JAICHAND,  Rdnd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1845  >  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  27th  December  1848. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family ;  claiming  descent  from  Surat  Chand, 
who  came  in  early  times  from  Kishtwar  in  Jammu,  and  conquered  this 
territory.  The  State  was  overrun  by  the  Gurkhas  between  1803  and  1815, 
and  after  their  expulsion  by  the  British  was  confirmed  to  the  then  Rana  by  a 
British  sanad  dated  3rd  September  1815.  The  area  of  the  State  (which  is 
one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States)  is  19  square  miles;  its  population  is  3648, 
chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a  military  force  of  40  infantry. 

Residence. — Kuthar,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 

KUVARJI  KOWASJI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  ist  March  1822.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her 
Most  Gracious  Majesty.  Appointed  to  the  service  of  the  Bombay  Govern- 
ment in  1840,  and  during  a  service  of  forty-six  years  held  various  important 
posts  with  credit  to  himself  and  advantage  to  the  State.  Retired  in  1886 
on  a  special  pension,  on  account  of  his  "long  and  highly  meritorious  services." 
Was  appointed  in  the  same  year  a  Delegate  in  the  Parsi  District  Matrimonial 
Court  of  Surat.  Is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  of  the  First  Class.  Has  a  son 
named  Pestanji  Kuvarji  Kowasji,  born  1860. 

Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 

KYAING  KAN,  KUN  UN,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  Chief  is  Myoza  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  frontier  of 
Burma.  Its  area  is  about  450  square  miles;  its  population  chiefly  consists 
of  Shans. 

Residence. — Kyaing  Kan,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KYAING  LUN,  KUN  MAUNG,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  Chief  is  Myoza  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  frontier  of 
Burma.  Its»area  is  about  30  square  miles;  its  population  almost  entirely 
Shans. 

Residence. — Kyaing  Lun,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KYAING  TON,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

This  Chief  is  the  Sawbwa  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  frontier 
of  Burma.  He  has  four  feudatory  chiefs  tributary  to  him  —  those  of 
Kyaing  Thingyi,  Maingthal,  Thinaung,  and  Thin  Nyut.  The  population 
consists  chiefly  of  Shans,  with  a  few  Yins. 

Residence. — Kyaing  Ton,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  279 

KYAING  YONGYI,  Chief  of . 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier. 
Residence. — Kyaing  Yongyi,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KYAUKKULBYWA,  MATING  THAING,  Ngwegunhmu  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Ngwegunhmu  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  frontier  of 
Burma.     The  area  of  the  State  is  about  80  square  miles. 
Residence. — Kyaukkuleywa,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

,  KYAW  GAUNG,  MAUNG,  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Mm. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Ye-u,  Burma. 

KYAW  LAW,  MAUNG,  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  It 
means  "  Recipient  of  the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery,"  and  is  indicated  by  the 
letters  T.D.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Paga"n,  Burma. 

KYBTHI  BANS  AN,  KUN  THAN,  Myozaof.* 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier. 
The  area  of  the  State  is  about  300  square  miles. 
Residence. — Kyethi  Bansan,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KYON,  MAUNG  PO,  Ngwegunhmu  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Ngwegunhmu  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States   on  the  Burma 
frontier.     The  area  of  the  State  is  about  1 5  square  miles. 
Residence. — Kyon,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

KYWB  O,  MAUNG  U,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  6th  June  1885.  It  means 
"  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the  letters 
K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Rangoon,  Burma. 

LACHHMAN.     See  Lakshman. 


28o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


LACHHMAN  DAS  HAZARIKA,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3rd  March  1880. 
Residence.  —  Lakhimpur,  Assam. 

LACHHMAN  DAS  SETH,   C.LE. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  2Qth  May  1886. 
Residence.  — 

LACHHMAN  PABSHAD  SINGH  (of  Asothar),  Rdjd. 
Born  1847.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Raja  is  descended  from 
Deogaj  Singh,  who  came  from  Khichhidara  or  Raghugarh  in  Central  India 
in  1543,  and  married  the  daughter  of  the  Raja  of  Aijhi,  and  subsequently 
succeeded  to  the  possessions  of  his  father-in-law.  About  150  years  later 
Araru  Singh  was  in  possession  of  the  Asothar  Zaminddri,  with  two  co- 
sharers;  but  owing  to  the  oppression  of  the  latter  he  became  reduced 
to  the  position  of  a  cultivator.  A  curious  tradition  is  told  of  him,  that 
he  was  once  sleeping  under  a  mahua  tree,  overcome  with  the  fatigue  of 
his  laborious  occupation,  when  an  Ahir  named  Bidhotar,  who  was  at  work 
in  the  neighbouring  field,  observed  a  large  cobra  approach  the  sleeping 
man,  endeavouring  to  screen  his  head  from  the  rays  of  the  sun  with  its 
expanded  hood  ;  and  when  Araru  resumed  his  ploughing,  he  presently 
found  a  great  golden  treasure,  with  which  he  repurchased  all  his  ancestral 
estates,  and  became  both  rich  and  powerful.  His  son,  Bhagwant  Rai, 
built  the  fort  at  Ghazipur,  and  defied  the  Imperial  troops  for  a  long 
time;  but  in  1760  A.D.  he  was  captured  by  treachery  and  slain.  He 
was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Rup  Rai,  who  died  in  1780,  leaving  the 
Raj  of  Asothar  to  his  son  Bariyar  Singh.  Subsequently  most  of  the 
family  possessions  were  resumed  by  the  Nawab  Vazir,  Asaf-ud-daula,  and 
only  a  pension  left  to  the  Raja.  Bariyar  Singh's  son,  Duniapat,  obtained 
a  confirmation  of  his  father's  pension  from  the  British  Government  in  1805. 
Duniapat's  adopted  son,  Raghubar  Singh,  died  in  the  former's  lifetime  ; 
and  Duniapat  was  succeeded  in  1850  by  Raghubar's  adopted  son,  the 
Raja  Lachhman  Parshad  Singh.  The  Raja  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate; 
and  has  issue  two  sons  —  Kunwar  Narpat  Singh  and  Kunwar  Chandra 
Bhukhan  Singh. 

,  Fatehpur,  North-  Western  Provinces. 


LACHHMAN  RAO,  Rao  Saheb. 

Born  8th  May  1845.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Rao  Saheb  being 
descended  from  Rao  Vinayek  Rao,  who  was  the  Diwan  or  Prime  Minister 
of  the  late  Mahratta  ruler  of  Sagar.  Vinayek  Rao  came  originally  from 
the  Deccan,  and  was  appointed  by  the  Mahratta  Government  first  to  be 
Mamlatdar.  On  the  cession  to  the  British  Government  the  family  received 
hereditary  pensions.  The  Rao  Saheb  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate.  He  has 
a  son  —  Rao  Ganpat  Rao  Saheb  Subahdar. 

Residence.  —  Sagar,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  281 

LACHHMAN  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,    and  was   conferred   on    24th  May   1882.      The 
Rai  Bahadur  belongs  to  a  family  from  Cawnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

LACHHMAN  SINGH  (of  Wazirpur),  Rdjd. 

Born  i pth  October  1826.  The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877, 
as  a  personal  distinction,  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress 
of  India.  Belongs  to  a  Rajput  family  of  the  Jadon  clan,  originally  resident 
at  Karemna  in  Rajputana.  About  130  years  ago  Karemna  was  burnt 
by  the  troops  of  the  Raja  of  Macheri  (Alwar)  in  his  war  with  the  Raja 
of  Bhartpur;  and  Kalyan  Singh,  the  ancestor  of  Lachhman  Singh,  took 
refuge  in  Bhartpur.  His  eldest  son  was  appointed  Fotehddr  of  Pargana 
Ruphas  by  the  Raja  of  Bhartpur,  but  was  subsequently  poisoned;  and 
the  younger  son,  Lachhman  Singh's  grandfather,  took  service  in  Sindhia's 
army.  He  died  at  Aligarh  a  few  months  before  the  capture  of  that  fortress 
by  the  British,  and  his  sons  removed  to  Agra.  His  grandson,  the  present 
Raja,  entered  the  Government  service  in  1847  >  and  for  his  services  during 
the  time  of  the  Mutiny,  and  generally  to  the  cause  of  education,  he  has 
received  the  title  of  Raja,  a  khilat^  and  various  grants. 

Residence. — Bulandshahr,  North- Western  Provinces. 

LACHHMESHWAE  SINGH,  SIR,  K.C.I.B.,  Mahdrdjd  Bahadur. 

See  Darbhanga. 

LACHHMINARAYAN  SINGH,  DEO  (of  Kera),  Thdkur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  as  a  personal  distinction, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India.  The  Thakur  is  one  of  the  representatives  of  the  great 
Porahat  family,  from  which  are  descended  the  feudatory  chiefs  of  Serikala 
and  Kharsawan,  and  other  Chota  Nagpur  chiefs  in  the  district  of  Singbhum. 

Residence. — Kera,  Singbhum,  Bengal. 

LAKHPAT  RAI,  Rai. 

Born  1825.  The  title  was  conferred  on  8th  October  1875,  as  a 
personal  distinction,  in  recognition  of  the  Rai's  exertions  in  'improving  the 
city  of  Peshawar.  He  belongs  to  a  Kshatriya  family,  and  is  the  son  of  the 
late  Diwan  Bhawani  Das,  who  held  the  responsible  and  important  office 
of  Daftri  in  Peshawar  during  the  Durani  and  Sikh  rule.  The  Rai  is 
an  Honorary  Magistrate  and  a  member  of  the  Municipal  Committee  of 
Peshawar. 

Residence. — Peshawar,  Punjab. 

LAKSHMAN  JAGANNATH,  Diwdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1 5th  August  1835.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February 
1887,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her 


282  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

Majesty's  reign.  Belongs  to  a  Chandraseniya  Kayastha  Prabhu  family; 
second  son  of  Jagannath  Baji  Rao,  Mamlatdar  in  Khandesh.  Prior  to 
his  appointment  as  Prime  Minister  of  the  Baroda  State  he  had  rendered 
long  and  meritorious  services  to  the  Bombay  Government;  and  while 
Deputy  Collector  of  Sholapur  endeared  himself  to  the  people  to  such 
an  extent  that  they  called  their  market  after  his  name,  "  Lakshmanpet." 
In  1874  he  became  Assistant  Revenue  Commissioner  of  the  Northern 
Division  of  the  Bombay  Presidency;  and  shortly  afterwards  was  invited 
to  aid  Mr.  Dadabhai  Naoroji  (subsequently  M.P.  for  Central  Finsbury) 
in  the  administration  of  Baroda.  He  became,  first,  Subahdar  of  the  Naosari 
district,  then  head  of  the  Revenue  Department  in  1883,  and  finally  in  1886 
Diwan  or  Prime  Minister  of  the  State.  He  retired  in  1890  with  a  pension 
from  the  British  Government,  and  handsome  allowances  from  the  Gaekwar. 
He  married  Bai  Sitabai,  and  has  issue  six  daughters — Gujabai,  Chandrabai, 
Chingubai,  Dhakubai,  Naobai,  and  Sundrabai. 

Residence. — Nardyan  Pet,  Poona,  Bombay. 

LAKSHMAN  JIVAJI  TILVB,  Rao  Saheb. 

Granted  the   title,   as    a   personal  distinction,    2nd  January    1893,   for 
eminent  services  in  the  Postal  Department. 
Residence. — Ahmedabad,  Bombay. 

LAKSHMI  KANTA  RAO  PANTULU,  JIDDU,  Diwdn  Bahddur. 

Born  yth  November  1833.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February 
1887,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her 
Majesty's  reign.  Educated  in  the  Nobles  College,  Masulipatam.  Entered 
the  service  of  the  Madras  Government  in  1855,  an<^  has  rendered  long  and 
meritorious  service ;  appointed  Deputy  Director  of  Revenue  Settlement  in 
1883.  On  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  her  Most  Gracious  Majesty 
as  Empress  of  India  at  the  Imperial  Assemblage  of  Delhi  on  ist  January 
1877,  he  received  a  Medal  of  Honour.  Has  issue  three  sons — (i)  J. 
Sundarayya,  B.A.,  born  1861  ;  (2)  J.  Lakshmayya,  born  1869  ;  (3)  J.  Sundara 
Nana  Rao,  born  1874. 

Residence. — Cuddalore,  Madras. 

LAKSHMI  SHANKAR  MISRA,  PANDIT,  Rai  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Benares,  North- Western  Provinces. 

T.AKSHMILAL  DAULATRAI,  Rao  Saheb. 

Granted  the  title,   as  a  personal   distinction,    2nd    January    1893,   for 
eminent  services  in  the  Baroda  Residency. 
Residence. — Baroda. 

LAL  BEG,  Khdn  Saheb. 

Granted    the    title,   as   a  personal   distinction,    2nd   January    1893,  for 
eminent  magisterial  services  in  the  Ganjam  Hill  Tracts,  Madras. 
Residence. — Ga"nja"m,  Madras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  283 


LAL  MADHAVA  MUKARJI,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  in  1841.  Belongs  to  a  Kulin  Brahman  family,  and  is  the  son  of 
Ishwar  Chandra  Mukarji,  an  old  and  much  respected  merchant  of  Calcutta. 
Educated  at  the  Free  Church  College  of  the  Calcutta  University;  and 
subsequently  graduated  at  the  Calcutta  Medical  College.  During  the  great 
Orissa  famine  of  1866  he  was  appointed  Medical  Officer  in  charge  of  the 
famine  hospitals  that  were  opened  at  Chitpore  and  Sealdah  for  the  relief  of 
the  famine-stricken.  His  good  services  there  were  duly  acknowledged  by 
the  Government  of  Bengal.  He  then  successively  held  the  appointments  of 
House  Surgeon  of  the  Calcutta  Ophthalmic  Hospital  for  thirteen  years,  and 
teacher  of  Ophthalmic  Medicine  and  Surgery  in  the  Campbell  School  for 
three  years.  He  has  taken  a  very  prominent  place  among  the  great  oculists 
of  the  world,  and  was  deputed  by  the  Government  of  India  to  Rajputana, 
to  attend  upon  His  Highness  the  Maharaja  of  Jaipur,  whose  eyesight  he 
successfully  restored.  He  translated  into  Bengali  the  English  text-book  on 
the  Diseases  of  the  £ye,  by  Dr.  Macnamara,  which  has  been  highly  eulogised 
by  the  most  competent  authorities.  In  1879  he  was  elected  a  Municipal 
Commissioner  for  the  town  of  Calcutta ;  and  has  been  re-elected  in  three 
subsequent  successive  elections.  Has  been  several  times  Member  of  the 
Town  Council  of  Calcutta.  Was  appointed  a  Fellow  of  the  Calcutta 
University  in  1881  ;  and  in  1890  became  a  Member  of  the  Syndicate.  He 
is  an  elected  Member  of  the  Council  of  the  Calcutta  Bethune  Society ;  of  the 
Calcutta  Health  Society ;  and  of  the  India  Club.  He  is  a  Justice  of  the 
Peace  for  the  town  of  Calcutta.  He  is  the  first  native  gentleman  who  has 
been  honoured  with  the  Presidentship  of  the  Calcutta  Medical  Society.  He 
is  also  the  President  and  Honorary  Lecturer  of  Ophthalmic  Medicine  and 
Surgery  in  the  Calcutta  Medical  School.  When  Her  Majesty  the  Empress, 
in  recognition  of  his  distinguished  medical  services,  was  pleased  to  confer 
upon  him  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  the  Government  of  India  also  presented 
him  with  a  handsome  sword  and  a  richly-embroidered  sword-belt. 

Residence. — Calcutta. 

LAL  MADHUB  MOOKBRJBB,  Rai  Bahadur. 
See  Lai  Madhava  Mukarji. 

LAL  RAGHURAJ  SINGH  (of  Pandaria),  Thdkur. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  founder  of  the  family  was  Sham  Chand ; 
and  the  late  Thakur  Gajapal  Singh  was  thirteenth  in  succession.  He  was 
the  younger  brother  of  the  Thakur  Rajpal  Singh,  feudatory  Chief  of 
Kawardha  (q.v.)  Thakur  Gajapal  Singh  has  been  recently  succeeded,  at 
Pandaria,  by  Thakur  Lai  Raghuraj  Singh. 

Residence. — Panda" ria,  Bila"spur,  Central  Provinces. 

LAL  SINGH,  Rao. 

Born  1844.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Rao  belongs  to  a  Chandel 
family;  descended  from  the  Raja  Sheoraj  Deo,  who  in  the  year  1393  of  the 
Samvat  era  came  from  Kanauj  to  Shiurajpur  in  Cawnpur  district,  and 


284  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

established  his  rule  over  the  neighbouring  country.     He  conferred  on  Sirghu 
Deo  the  title  of  Rao,  and  allowed  him  to  settle  in  mauza  Sipai,  and  ever 
since  the  Chandels  of  this  house  have    been    recognised  as  holding   the 
title  of  Rao.     The  Rao  has  a  son  named  Dharmraj  Singh. 
Residence. — Sipai,  Cawnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 

LAL  SINGH  (of  Bheri),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  is  the  cousin  of  Sardar  Bishan  Singh 
(q.v.)  of  Bheri,  in  the  district  of  Ludhiana,  Punjab.  Belongs  to  a  Jat  (Sikh) 
family,  descended  from  Sardar  Mahtab  Singh,  Miran  Kotia,  a  Sikh  Chief, 
well  known  for  his  prowess,  who  flourished  about  the  year  1761  A.D.  His 
son,  Sardar  Rai  Singh,  acquired  by  conquest  some  territory  in  the  Ambala 
district  more  than  a  century  ago.  The  family  came  under  British  protection, 
with  the  other  Cis-Sutlej  Chiefs,  after  the  first  Sikh  war.  Sardar  Ratan 
Singh  succeeded  his  father,  Rai  Singh ;  and  his  grandsons  are  the  Sardars 
Bishan  Singh  (son  of  Sardar  Sarmukh  Singh)  and  Lai  Singh  (son  of  Sardar 
Gurmukh  Singh)  of  Bheri. 

Residence. — Bheri,  Ludhiana,  Punjab. 

LAL  SINGH  (of  Talwandi),  Sarddr. 

Born  1822.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  is  the  grandson  of  the 
Sardar  Dal  Singh  Naharna,  who  was  adopted  by  the  widow  of  the  great 
Sardar  Fateh  Singh,  Kalianwala,  and  inherited  his  large  possessions.  He 
died  in  1823,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son,  Sardar  Atar  Singh,  who, 
about  the  year  1846,  received  a  seat  in  the  Council  of  Regency,  which  he 
retained  until  the  annexation  of  the  Punjab.  On  the  occasion  of  the 
outbreak  at  Multan,  Sardar  Atar  Singh  joined  the  British  under  Major 
Edwardes.  His  son,  the  present  Sardar  Lai  Singh,  was  at  first  carried  off 
by  the  troops  ;  but  afterwards  escaped,  and  joined  the  same  side.  Sardar 
Atar  Singh  died  in  1851,  and  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Sardar. 

Residence. — Talwandi,  Amritsar,  Punjab. 

LALA  SAHBB  (of  Imlai),  Rdjd. 

Born  1862.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  Raj  Gond 
(aboriginal)  family,  whose  ancestors  came  from  Dhamda  to  Mandla,  and 
obtained  somejdgirs  from  Sheo  Raj  Rai,  the  Gond  Raja  of  Mandla,  because 
they  were  caste-fellows  of  the  Raja.  This  was  in  1624  A.D.,  and  the  family 
have  been  settled  at  Imlai  in  the  Jabalpur  district  ever  since.  One  of  their 
ancestors  married  a  daughter  of  the  Rajput  house  of  Ratanpur. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

LALGARH,  DIWAN  HARI  SINGH,  Diwdn  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1877  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  22nd  December  1888. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  State  contains  a  population  of 
about  2500,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Ldlgarh,  Western  Mdlwa",  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  285 

LA  LIT  MOHAN  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  Rai  Bahadur  has  rendered  good  service  as  an  Honorary  Magistrate, 
and  as  Vice-Chairman  of  the  District  Board  of  Hughli,  Bengal.  Received 
the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  25th  May  1892. 

Residence. — Hughli,  Bengal. 

LALJI  PURSHOTAM  RAI,  Rao  Bahadur,  Diwdn  Bahadur. 

Both  these  titles  are  personal.  The  former  was  conferred  on  i5th 
December  1881.  The  second  title,  that  of  Diwan  Bahadur,  was  conferred 
on  25th  May  1892,  for  good  service  as  an  assistant  to  the  Resident  at 
Baroda. 

Residence. — Baroda. 

LALLU  LACHHMAN  SINGH,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1869. 
Residence. — Dholpur,  Ra"jputa"na. 

LALUBHAI  KASANDAS,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1889. 
Residence. — Baroda. 

LALUBHAI  NANDLAL,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3rd  February  1886. 
Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 

LANGRIN,  U.,  BOR  SINGH,  Sam  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1850;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  September  1874.  The 
population  of  the  State  (which  is  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States, 
Assam)  is  about  1200,  and  consists  of  Khasis  and  Christians. 

Residence. — Langrin,  Khdsi  Hills,  Assam. 

LAS  BBLA,  MIR  HAJI  JAM  SIR  ALI  KHAN,  K.C.I.B.,/^  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1849;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  2ist  January  1889.  The  Jam  was 
formerly  a  feudatory  of  the  Wali  of  Kalat,  but  has  now  the  direct  protection 
of  the  British  Government,  through  the  Governor-General's  Agent  for 
Baluchistan.  He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of 
the  Indian  Empire  on  the  institution  of  that  Order,  ist  January  1878; 
and  was  promoted  to  be  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  same  Most  Eminent 
Order,  2nd  January  1893.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  8500  square  miles, 
and  its  population  about  56,000,  chiefly  Muhammadans.  The  Jam  maintains 
a  military  force  of  33  cavalry,  276  infantry,  and  4  guns,  and  is  entitled  to 
a  salute  of  9  guns  as  a  personal  distinction. 

Residence. — Las  Bela,  Baluchistan. 


286  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


LATHI,  THAKUR  SURSINGHJI  TAKHTSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1875;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  4th  November  1878. 
Belongs  to  a  Gohel  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  which  claim  to  be  Suryavansi 
(of  the  Solar  race),  as  descendants  of  the  legendary  hero  Rama.  The 
Gohel  sept  of  Rajputs  are  said  to  have  occupied  a  part  of  Marwar  for 
twenty  generations,  until  they  were  expelled  by  the  Rahtors  (see  Jodhpur)  at 
the  end  of  the  i2th  century.  Thence,  under  their  Chief,  Sejak,  they 
migrated  to  Kathiawar,  about  the  year  1260,  and  are  at  present  represented 
in  Kathiawar  by  the  ruling  families  of  Bhaunagar,  Rajpipla,  Palitana,  and 
Lathi.  The  founder  of  the  Lathi  State  was  Sarangji,  second  son  of  Sejak, 
whose  eldest  son  became  the  ancestor  of  the  Chiefs  of  Bhaunagar,  whilst  the 
third  son  was  the  ancestor  of  the  Chiefs  of  Palitana.  One  of  the  Thakurs  of 
Lawa  married  his  daughter  to  Damaji  Gaekwar,  the  great  ancestor  of  the 
Gaekwars  of  Baroda ;  and  gave  the  estate  of  Damnagar  as  a  dowry,  being  in 
return  exempted  personally  from  tribute.  The  State  is  tributary  both  to 
Baroda  and  to  Junagarh ;  and  in  addition  to  the  tribute  the  Chief  of  Lawa 
annually  offers  a  horse  to  the  Gaekwar  of  Baroda,  probably  in  commemoration 
of  the  relationship  between  the  families.  The  town  of  Lathi,  which  is  the 
capital,  is  now  a  station  on  the  Bhaunagar-  Gondal  railway ;  it  has  the 
palace  of  the  Thakur,  a  Dharmsdla,  a  good  Dispensary,  Post  and  Telegraph 
Office,  and  the  Lathi  Anglo- Vernacular  School.  The  area  of  the  State  is  42 
square  miles;  its  population  6804,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Chief  maintains 
a  military  force  of  12  cavalry,  25  infantry,  and  10  guns. 

Residence. — Ldthi,  Ka'thi^wa'r,  Bombay. 


LATIP  ALI  KHAN  walad  AHMAD,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikarpur,  Sind. 


LATIF  HUSAIN  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


LAW  YAN,  MAUNG,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.     It 
means  "  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the 
letters  K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Mandalay,  Burma. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  287 


LAWA,  THAKUR  DHIRAT  SINGH,  Thakur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Thakur  belongs  to  the  Kachhwaha  Rajput  family — that  is,  the  ruling 
family  of  Jaipur  (q.v.\  the  State  having  originally  belonged  to  Jaipur,  and 
having  been  granted  by  the  Maharaja  of  Jaipur  to  one  of  the  scions  of  his 
family.  It  was  conquered  by  the  Pindari  leader,  Amir  Khan,  in  the  course 
of  his  Jaipur  and  Jodhpur  campaigns;  and  the  Thakur  of  Lawa  then 
became  a  feudatory  of  Amir  Khan's  State  of  Tonk.  In  1867,  however,  this 
connection  was  terminated,  and  Lawa  came  under  the  direct  protection  of 
the  British  Government.  The  area  of  the  State  is  18  square  miles;  its 
population  is  2682,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Lawa,  Ra~jputa"na. 

LAXAMAN.     See  Lakshman. 


LAXUMAN  JAGANNATHJI,  VAIDYA,  Diwdn  Bahadur. 
See  Lakshman  Jagannath. 

LB  BUN  YU,  Kyet  Thdye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

Granted  the  title,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893.  It  is 
indicated  by  the  letters  K.S.M.  after  the  name,  and  means  "Recipient  of  the 
Gold  Chain  of  Honour." 

Residence. — Rangoon,  Burma. 


LBGYA,  KUN  LB,   Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Sawbwa  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
the  area  of  which  is  about  1000  square  miles.  The  population  consists 
almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — -Legya,  Burma. 

LEHNA  SINGH  (of  Manasawal),  Rand. 

Born  1 80 1.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  very  ancient  Rajput 
family,  that  claims  to  be  descended  from  the  legendary  hero  Krishna,  through 
Basu  Chand,  who  is  said  to  have  taken  possession  of  Garhmuktesar,  and  to 
have  reigned  there  about  2000  years  ago.  His  descendant,  Jodh  Chand, 
with  three  brothers,  is  said  to  have  visited  Jwalamukh  on  a  pilgrimage,  and 
on  that  occasion  to  have  taken  possession  of  Manasawal  and  the  surrounding 
territory  in  the  Hoshiarpur  district.  Rana  Chigar  Chand,  thirty-third  in 
descent  from  Basu  Chand,  made  his  submission  to  the  Maharaja  Ranjit 
Singh,  and  is  said  to  have  been  confirmed  by  him  in  some  of  his  lands.  The 
Rana  has  four  sons — Opindar  Singh,  Madho  Singh,  Janardhan,  and  another. 

Residence. — Manasawal,  Hoshiarpur,  Punjab. 


288  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

LEHNA  SINGH,   CHIMNI,   Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Gujrdn wala,  Punjab. 

LIAKAT  HUSAIN,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Meerut,  North-Western  Provinces. 

LIKHI,  THAKUR  JASWANT  SINGHJI,   Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1886  ;  has  recently  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor.  Belongs  to 
a  Koli  (aboriginal)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  30  square  miles ;  its 
population  is  1307,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Likhi,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

LIMBAJI  RAO  TUKAJI  RAO,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  4th  May  1885. 
Residence. — Bija"pur,  Bombay. 

LIMBDI,   Thdkur  Saheb  of.     See  Limri. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  289 


LIMRI,  THAKUR  SAHBB  SIR  JASWANTSINGHJI, 
FATBHSINGHJI,  K.C.I.B.,  Thdkur  Saheb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  23rd  May  1859;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  3oth  January 
1862.  Belongs  to  a  Jhala  Rajput  (Hindu)  family;  claiming  a  common 
descent  with  the  Chief  of  Dhrangadra  from  Harpaldev,  who  came  from  the 
north  in  very  early  times,  and  established  himself  in  that  part  of  Kathiawar 
called  Jhalawar  from  the  name  of  his  sept.  The  present  Chief,  who  suc- 
ceeded his  father,  the  Thakur  Saheb  Fatehsinghji,  was  educated  at  the 
Rajkumar  College,  Rajkot,  and  finished  his  education  by  visiting  England 
in  company  with  the  Principal  of  that  College.  He  attained  his 
majority  in  1877  ;  and  on  ist  August  of  that  year  was  installed  as  ruler. 
In  1884  the  Government  of  Bombay,  in  recognition  of  the  ability  and 
industry  with  which  he  conducted  the  administration  of  his  State,  appointed 
him  a  Member  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  Bombay.  In  1887  he  was 
selected  as  one  of  the  representatives  of  the  Princes  of  Western  India  to 
present  their  loyal  congratulations  to  the  Queen  Empress  on  the  auspicious 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  Her  Majesty's  reign ;  and  on  that  occasion  he  had 
the  honour  of  receiving  from  the  Empress  in  person  the  insignia  of  a  Knight 
Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire.  He  extended 
his  tour  to  all  the  chief  places  of  interest  in  the  United  Kingdom,  in  Canada, 
and  in  the  United  States;  and  was  the  guest  successively  of  the  Lord- 
Lieutenant  of  Ireland,  of  the  Viceroy  of  the  Canadian  Dominion,  and  of  the 
President  of  the  United  States.  He  has  the  reputation  of  being  a  most  able 
and  painstaking  ruler,  and  has  received  high  acknowledgment  of  his  ability 
and  success  from  successive  Governors  of  Bombay.  The  area  of  the  State 
is  344  square  miles;  its  population  is  about  43,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but 
including  more  than  4600  Muhammadans.  The  Thakur  Saheb  maintains  a 
military  force  of  35  cavalry,  174  infantry,  and  28  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Limri  (or  Limbdi),  Kathiawdr,  Bombay. 


29o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


LOGHASSI,  Rao  Bahadur  of.      See  Lughasi. 

LOHARU,  'NAWAB   AMIR-UD-DIN   AHMAD    KHAN 

BAHADUR,  FAKHAR-UD-DAULA,  C.I.E.,  Nawdb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  3ist  October  1884.  Belongs  to  an 
Afghan  (Muhammadan)  family,  descended  from  Ahmad  Bakhsh  Khdn,  who 
was  employed  by  the  Raja  of  Alwar  in  the  negotiations  with  Lord  Lake  in 
1806.  In  recognition  of  his  services  he  received  Loharu  from  the  Raja, 
and  the  feudal  possession  of  Firuzpur  from  the  British  Government.  His 
son,  Shams-ud-din  Khan,  succeeded  him,  but  was  executed  at  Delhi  in 
1835  for  compassing  the  murder  of  the  British  Resident  at  Delhi.  In  con- 
sequence of  this  Firuzpur  was  confiscated ;  but  Loharu  was  subsequently 
restored  to  the  brothers  of  the  Chief,  who  had  no  share  in  his  guilt,  Amin-ud- 
din  Khan  and  Zia-ud-din  Khan;  and  Amin-ud-din  was  the  great-grandfather 
of  the  present  Nawab.  The  title  of  Nawab  was  restored  to  the  family,  in 
1866,  as  a  personal  distinction;  and  in  1874  it  was  conferred  on  the  Chief 
in  recognition  of  good  administration.  Created  a  Companion  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  2nd  January  1893.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  226  square  miles;  its  population  13,754,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including 
1517  Muhammadans.  The  Nawab  maintains  a  military  force  of  94  men. 

Residence. — Loha~ru,  Hissa>,  Punjab. 

LORINDA  MAL,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Pesha'war,  Punjab. 

LU  THA,  MAUNG,  Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya  Min. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  It 
means  "  Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour,"  and  is  indicated  by  the 
letters  K.S.M.  after  the  name. 

Residence. — Myingyan,  Burma. 

LUGHASI,  RAO  BAHADUR  KHBT  SINGH,  Rao  Bahadur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  2ist  July  1856  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  3rd  January  1872.  Belongs 
to  the  great  Bundela  Rajput  (Hindu)  family  of  the  Orchha  House,  from  which 
are  descended  the  ruling  families  of  Panna,  Datia,  Ajaigarh,  and  most  of  the 
other  States  of  Bundelkhand ;  all  tracing  their  lineage  from  the  same  epony- 
mous hero,  Bir  Singh,  who  first  adopted  the  clan  name  of  Bundela.  His 
descendant,  the  Maharaja  Chhatrasal,  possessed  large  territories  in  Bundel- 
khand ;  and  is  famous  for  having  called  in  the  aid  of  the  Mahrattas  against 
the  Mughal  Power,  and  having  adopted  the  Peshwa  as  one  of  his  sons,  who 
thereby  acquired  a  third  of  his  dominions,  and  a  footing  in  Bundelkhand. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  291 

Chhatrasal's  eldest  son,  Hardi  Sah,  succeeded  him  at  Panna ;  and  he  had 
two  sons,  the  elder  of  whom  became  Raja  of  Panna,  while  the  younger, 
Salim  Singh,  became  Diwan  of  Lughasi.  His  son,  the  Diwan  Dhiraj  Singh, 
received  a  sanad  from  the  British  Government  in  1808.  Three  generations 
have  intervened  between  Dhiraj  Singh  and  the  present  Chief.  In  1857  the 
Diwan  Sardar  Singh,  of  Lughasi  was  loyal  to  the  Government  during  the  time 
of  the  Mutiny,  though  half  the  villages  of  the  State  were  laid  waste  by  the 
rebels  in  consequence  of  his  fidelity.  As  a  reward  for  these  services,  the 
Diwan  received  the  hereditary  title  of  Rao  Bahadur  at  the  Cawnpur  Darbar 
of  1859,  together  with  a  khilat,  a  valuable  jdgir,  and  a  sanad  authorising  the 
privilege  of  adoption.  The  present  Rao  Bahadur  is  grandson  of  Sardar 
Singh.  The  area  of  the  State  is  47  square  miles;  its  population  6159, 
chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rao  Bahadur  maintains  a  military  force  of  6  cavalry, 
78  infantry,  and  7  guns. 

Residence. — Lugha'si,  Bundelkhand,  Central  India. 

LUNAWARA,  MAHARANA  SHRI  SIR  WAKHATSINGHJI, 

K.C.I.B.,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  nth  August  1860 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  7th  October 
1867.  Belongs  to  the  family  of  the  great  Solanki  clan  of  Rajputs,  claiming 
descent  from  Sidraj  Jaisingh,  the  ruler  of  Anhalwara  Patan  and  Gujarat.  The 
Maharana's  ancestors  are  said  to  have  established  themselves  as  Chiefs  of 
Virpur  in  1225  A.D.  ;  and  in  1434  A.D.  Rana  Bhimsinghji  removed  to  Luna- 
wara  across  the  Mahi.  The  State  was  tributary  both  to  Baroda  and  to 
Gwalior ;  but  the  rights  of  the  latter  were  transferred  to  the  British  Govern- 
ment in  1 86 1.  The  Maharana  was  educated  at  the  Rajkumar  College, 
Rajkot;  and  was  installed  as  ruler  in  August  1880  on  attaining  his  majority. 
He  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the 
Indian  Empire,  25th  May  1889.  The  area  of  the  State  is  388  square  miles; 
its  population  about  76,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  over  3000 
Muhammadans.  The  Maharana  maintains  a  military  force  of  201  cavalry, 
295  infantry,  and  40  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Luna"wa"ra,  Rewa*  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 

LUTF  ALI  KHAN,  SAYYID,  O.I.B.,  Nawdb. 

The  title  of  Nawab  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty.  The  Nawab  has  also  been  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 

Residence. — Patna. 

LWE-E,  MAUNG  KYI,  Ngwegunhmu  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Ngwegunhmu  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma 
frontier,  which  has  an  area  of  about  30  square  miles.  Its  population 
consists  almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Lwe-e,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


292  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

LWELON,  MAUNG  KAN  CHOK,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier ; 
its  area  is  about  400  square  miles.  The  population  consists  almost  entirely 
of  Shans. 

Residence. — Lwelon,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

LWBMAW,  MAUNG  SHWB  PYI,  Ngwegunhmu  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Ngwegunhmu  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma 
frontier;  the  area  of  which  is  about  25  square  miles.  The  population 
consists  almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Lwemaw,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MADAD  ALI,  MIR,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1819.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i  ith  January  1869,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  together  with  a  khilat.  Belongs  to  the  family  of  Barha  Sayyids 
of  Muzaffarnagar.  Rendered  good  service  for  thirty-three  years  as  Tahsildar 
and  Deputy  Collector ;  and  in  recognition  of  his  services  during  the  Mutiny 
he  received  a  khilat  and  a  grant  of  land. 

Residence. — Allahabad,  North-Western  Provinces. 

MAD  AN  GOPAL  (of  Padrauna),  Rai. 

Born  1829.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Belongs  to  a  family  of  Kurmis, 
claiming  descent  from  the  celebrated  Mayyura  Misra,  being  thus  connected 
with  the  families  of  the  Rajas  of  Majhauli  and  Tamkuhi  (q.v.)  Rai  Isri 
Partab  rendered  good  service  in  the  Mutiny,  and  was  an  Honorary  Magistrate 
for  ten  years  before  his  death,  when  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  pre- 
sent Rai. 

Residence. — Padrauna,  Gorakhpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 

MADAN  MOHAN  BAISAK,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January 
1893,  for  eminent  services  in  the  Postal  Department. 
Residence. — C  alcutta. 

MADHAN,  Chief  of. 

Is  a  feudatory  of  the  Raja  of  Keonthal  (g.v.\  and  rules  over  one  of  the 
Simla  Hill  States. 

Residence. — Madhan,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 

MADHAVA  RAO,  SIR  TANJORB,  K.C.S.I.,  Rdjd. 

The  title  of  Raja  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India ;  at  which  time  Sir  Madhava  Rao  was  Diwan 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


293 


or  Prime  Minister  of  Baroda  (q.v.)  Sir  Madhava  is  well  known,  not  in 
India  alone,  but  throughout  the  British  Empire,  as  one  of  the  ablest,  most 
distinguished,  and  most  patriotic  of  modern  Indian  Statesmen.  His  early 
years  were  largely  devoted  to  the  service  of  the  State  of  Travancore,  where 
he  was  guardian  and  tutor  of  the  Maharaja,  and  where  his  abilities  were  con- 
spicuously displayed  in  the  development  of  that  State.  He  was  selected  by 
the  Government  of  India  for  the  difficult  and  important  post  of  Prime 
Minister  of  Baroda  at  a  great  crisis  in  the  history  of  that  State ;  and  his 
admirable  services  have  been  abundantly  recognised,  both  by  His  Highness 
the  Gaekwar,  and  by  the  Government  of  India. 
Residence. — M  adras. 


MADHAVRAO  JANOJI  PUAR,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  Qth  April  1883. 
Residence. — Na*sik,  Bombay. 

MADHAVRAO  MALHARRAO  (of  Nagar),  Viskwasrao. 

The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — KMndesh,  Bombay. 

MADHAVRAO  SOMAJI  MORE,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title,   as  a  personal  distinction,    2nd    January    1893,   for 
eminent  services  in  the  Salt  Department. 
Residence. — B  ombay. 


MADHO  PRASAD  SINGH  (of  Adharganj),  Rai. 

Born  nth  October  1847.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Rai  being  the 
representative  of  the  great  Bachgoti  sept  of  Rajputs,  sprung  from  the  ancient 
and  illustrious  family  of  the  Chauhan  Rajputs  of 
Mainpuri  (q.v.)  The  sept  having  incurred  the 
excessive  wrath  of  the  Emperor  Ala -ud- din  of 
Delhi,  who  vowed  its  extermination,  the  survivors 
emigrated,  and  for  safety's  sake  adopted  the  name 
of  Vasishtagoti  (contracted  into  Batasgoti,  and 
ultimately  Bachgoti),  from  the  saint  who  called 
forth  their  ancestor  (the  Agnikula)  from  the  fire  to 
defend  the  Munis  of  Mount  Abu  against  the 
demons.  The  Chief,  Bariar  Singh,  descendant 
of  Chahir  Deo,  Prithvi  Raj's  brother,  left  Sambhal- 
garh,  and  wandering  eastward,  settled  about  1248 
A.D.  in  Sultanpur,  Oudh.  He  married  the 
daughter  of  Raja  Ram  Deo,  Bhilkaria,  Chief 
of  Patti,  became  chief  military  officer  under 

the    Raja,     and    ultimately    dispossessed   his    brother-in-law,    and    seized 
the  territory.      His    descendant,    Bodh    Singh,    received   the   title   of  Rai 


The  Santak  of  the  Chauhan 
Rajputs,  called  Cfiakra,  used 
in  the  seal  and  for  signature. 

(A  circle  with  four  Trisulas  or 
Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car- 
dinal points.) 


294  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

from  the  Hasanpur  Raja  of  Sultanpur,  and  aiding  the  Nawab  Shuja-ud- 
daula  in  his  war  against  the  British,  was  defeated  with  him  at  the  battle 
of  Baksar  in  1775  A.D.  His  grandson,  Rai  Mihrban  Singh,  was  driven 
into  exile  by  the  Nawab,  and  his  fort  of  Kot  Bhilkar  was  sacked  by  the  latter 
about  the  year  1780.  His  three  sons,  who  in  turn  succeeded,  gradually  re- 
acquired  much  of  the  family  property.  The  youngest,  Rai  Sitla  Bakhsh,  was 
succeeded  by  his  elder  son,  Rai  Kalka  Bakhsh  Singh ;  and  the  latter  by  his 
brother,  the  present  Rai,  on  23rd  November  1857.  He  is  an  Honorary 
Magistrate  and  an  Assistant  Collector. 
Residence. — Dalippur,  Partabgarh,  Oudh. 

MADHO  RAO,  Rao  and  Potddr. 

Born  3ist  January  1832.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  being  originally 
conferred  by  the  old  Mahratta  Government  of  Sagar.  The  Rao's  grandfather 
was  an  important  officer  of  that  Government ;  and  he  was  succeeded  by  his 
son,  the  Rao  Lachman  Rao,  who  was  appointed  Mamlatdar  of  Narsinghpur, 
and  received  a  political  pension  from  the  British  Government  on  the  cession. 
He  was  succeeded  by  his  widow,  the  Mussamat  Parvati  Bai,  who  still  enjoys 
a  pension ;  and  the  Mussamat  adopted  the  present  Rao. 

Residence. — Sagar,  Central  Provinces. 

MADHO  SINGH  (of  Amethi),  Rdjd. 

Bom  2pth  November  1823.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  in  the 
family  from  early  times.  Is  the  Chief  of  the  Bandhalgoti  sept  of  Rajputs, 
claiming  descent  from  Suda  Rai,  a  scion  of  the  Kachhwaha  (Surajvansi) 
dynasty  of  Jaipur  (q.v.\  who  is  said  to  have  migrated  from  Narwargarh, 
conquered  the  Bhars  of  Amethi,  and  built  a  fort  at  Raipur.  The  sixth  in 
descent  from  him  was  Mandhata  Singh,  who  was  childless ;  but  with  the  aid 
of  a  saint's  prayers  a  son  was  born  to  him,  who  was  called  Bandhu,  in 
memory  of  the  circumstances  of  his  birth — whence  the  clan  name  of  Band- 
hugoti  or  Bandhalgoti.  Raja  Gurdat  Singh  in  1743  was  besieged  at  Raipur 
by  the  Nawab  Safdar  Jang ;  Raipur  was  taken  and  destroyed,  and  the  Raja 
escaped  to  Ramnagar,  which  thenceforward  became  his  headquarters.  His 
grandson  was  the  Raja  Hara  Chand  Singh,  who  was  the  grandfather  of  the 
late  Raja  Bisheswar  Singh,  and  also  of  the  present  Raja.  On  Bisheswar 
Singh's  dying  childless  in  1842,  he  was  succeeded  by  his  cousin,  the  present 
Raja.  In  the  time  of  the  Mutiny  in  1857  the  Raja  at  first  distinguished 
himself  by  protecting  the  refugees  from  Sultanpur,  whom  he  safely  conducted 
to  Allahabad.  Later,  however,  he  joined  the  rebels;  but  in  August  1858  he 
surrendered  his  fort  at  Amethi,  and  was  ultimately  pardoned.  In  1860  he 
was  made  a  Magistrate.  He  has  a  son  and  heir,  Lai  Lachhman  Singh. 

Residence. — Amethi,  Sultanpur,  Oudh. 

MADHO  SINGH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1821.  The  title  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883,  as  a  personal 
distinction.  Belongs  to  a  Kshatriya  family  of  the  Bais  clan,  whose  ancestors 
nine  generations  ago  came  from  Baiswara  in  Oudh,  and  settled  in  the  Jaunpur 
district.  The  Rai  Bahadur  rendered  valuable  service  during  the  time  of  the 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  295 

Mutiny  in  1857,  and  from  the  first  boldly  took  the  side  of  the  Government. 
He  rendered  every  assistance  to  Government,  and  protected  the  lives  and 
property  of  several  indigo-planters ;  for  these  services  he  received  a  sanad 
and  a  grant  of  land,  and  subsequently  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur. 
Residence. — Jaunpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


MADHO  SINGH,  THAKUR,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  as  a  personal  distinction, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India. 

Residence. — Kharwa,  Central  Provinces. 


MAGORI,  THAKUR  HIMATSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  ist  March  1832  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  on  the  death 
of  his  father,  the  late  Thakur  Fatehsinghji,  2nd  February  1835.  The  Thakur 
belongs  to  the  illustrious  family  of  the  Chiefs  of  the  Rahtor  clan  of  Rajputs, 
claiming  descent  from  the  legendary  hero  Rama,  and  the  ancient  Rahtor 
Emperors  of  Kanauj  of  the  Suryavansi  or  Solar  race,  through  the  House  of 
Idar ;  the  founder  of  the  Magori  family,  Ratansinghji,  having  been  a  younger 
son  of  a  Rawal  of  Malpur  (q.v.),  who  was  descended  from  a  younger  son  of 
one  of  the  ancient  Raos  of  Idar  (j.v.\  who  in  turn  was  descended  from  the 
second  son  of  the  last  Rahtor  sovereign  of  Kanauj.  Certain  payments  called 
kichri  are  made  annually  by  this  State  to  Idar.  The  Thakur  has  two  sons, 
Kunwars  Mokhamsinghji  and  Daulatsinghji.  The  area  of  the  State  is  75 
square  miles;  its  population  3076,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Magori,  Malii  Kdntha,  Bombay. 


MAHA  SINGH  (of  Kharsal),  Sarddr. 

Born  1849.  The  title  is  hereditary. 
The  Sardar  Maha  Singh  belongs  to  a 
Gond  (aboriginal)  family,  claiming  descent 
from  Urdhabo  Gond,  a  soldier  of  fortune 
who  came  from  Garha-Mandla,  and  settled 
in  Sambalpur,  acquiring  &jdgirfor  military 
services  from  the  reigning  Raja  of  Sam- 
balpur. The  head  of  this  family  uses  the 
Gond  device  as  a  signature. 

Residence. — Kharsal,  Sambalpur,  Central 
Provinces. 


MAHAB  ALI  walad  ABBAS  ALI  KHAN,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  a  representative  of  one  of  the  Mirs 
or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Sind. 


296  THE  GOLDEN   BOOK  OF  INDIA 

MAHABIR  PRASHAD  SAH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  loth  September  1875,  f°r  his 
liberality  during  the  famine  of  1873-74,  and  in  recognition  of  the  good 
services  of  his  family  to  the  Government. 

Residence. — Sdran,  Bengal. 

MAHADA JI  BALLAL  LAGHATB,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Bombay. 


MAHADBO  GOVIND  RANADE,  C.I.B.,  Rao  Bahadur. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire  i5th  February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of 
Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 

Residence. — B  ombay. 


MAHADEV  WASUDEV  BARVE,  C.I.E.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  of  Rai  Bahadur  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January 
1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India.  The  Rai  Bahadur  has  been  created  a  Companion  of  the 
Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 

Residence. — Ratnagiri,  Bombay. 


MAHARAJ  SINGH  (of  Haldaur),  Rdjd  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1878. 
Residence. — Bijnaur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


MAHARAJ  SINGH  (of  Patan),  Rao. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Mughal 
Emperor  of  Delhi,  through  the  Subahdar  Ghairat  Khan,  for  good  services  in 
capturing  the  fortress  of  Dhamoni.  Belongs  to  the  same  family  as  that  of  the 
Rao  Bhopal  Singh  of  Sehora,  in  Sagar  district.  The  Rao  Maharaj  Singh  is 
the  son  of  the  late  Rao  Khuman  Singh  of  Patan,  whom  he  succeeded. 

Residence. — Patan,  Sdgar,  Central  Provinces. 


MAHARAJ  SINGH,  THAKUR,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  aoth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Sa~gar,  Central  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  297 


MAHARAM,  KISON  SINGH,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i5th  December  1877.  The  Seim  is 
the  Chief  of  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  under  the  Chief  Com- 
missioner of  Assam;  its  population  is  7591,  consisting  chiefly  of  Khasis 
and  Christians. 

Residence. — Maharam,  Khdsi  Hills,  Assam. 

MAHBUB  BAKHSH,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1879. 
Residence. — Delhi,  Punjab. 

MAHBUB  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1884. 
Residence. — Muzaffargarh,  Punjab. 

MAHBNDRA  LAL  KHAN,  Rdjd.     See  Midnapur,  Rdjd  of. 

MAHENDRA  LAL  SIRCAR,  C.I.B. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1883. 


29S 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MAHBNDRA  MAHENDRA  SINGH,  RAJA  (of  Bhadawar), 
C.I.B.,  Maharaja. 

Born  26th  September  1835.  The  title  of  Mahardja  is  personal,  and 
was  conferred  on  25th  July  1881  ;  but  the  title  of  Raja  of  Bhadawar  is  here- 
ditary, and  the  Maharaja  is  the  present  head  and 
representative  of  one  of  the  greatest  and  most 
powerful  historical  families  of  the  North- Western 
Provinces.  He  is  the  Chief  of  the  Bhadauriya 
sept  of  the  illustrious  Chauhan  clan  of  Rajputs ; 
has  married  a  sister  of  the  Raja  of  Mainpuri,  who 
is  the  Chief  of  all  the  Chauhans,  and  has  a  son  and 
heir,  Maharajkumar  Mahendra  Sumrat  Singh,  born 
nth  October  1875.'  The  Maharaja  has  been 
exempted  from  personal  appearance  in  the  Civil 
The  santak  of  the  Chauhan  Courts,  and  (together  with  his  retainers)  from  the 

Rajputs,  called  Ckakra,  used  r  i    '  •   •  c    ^        A  A     4 

in  the  seal  and  for  signature,      operation  of  certain  provisions  of  the  Arms  Act. 
(A  circle  with  four  Trisuias  or     He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent 

Tridents  as  radii  at  the  car-  r    i        T     j  •          •»-«         ;  ^     -\/r  o 

dinai  points.)  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  3001  May  1891. 

Achal  Deo  was  the  ancestor  of  the  Bhadawar 

family  at  the  time  of  Timur's  invasion,  and  he  appears  to  have  given 
the  name  of  Bhadauriya  to  his  sept  of  Rajputs,  from  the  village  of 
Bhadaura,  on  the  right  bank  of  the  Jumna,  in  the  Agra  district.  In  the 
time  of  the  Emperor  Akbar,  Rajao  Rawat,  then  the  head  of  the  family, 
slew  a  famous  Meo  freebooter  named  Haitu,  and  obtained  great  honours 
and  rewards  from  the  Great  Mughal,  including  the  title  of  "Mahendra," 
Lord  of  the  Earth.  In  the  Ain-i-Akbari  of  Abul  Fazl,  the  grandson  of 
Rajao  Rawat  is  entered  as  a  mansabddr  of  500,  with  the  title  of  Raja. 
At  the  Court  of  the  Emperor  Shah  Jahan,  the  Raja  Padam  Singh, 
Bhadauriya,  was  a  mansabddr  of  1500.  Azam  Shah,  the  son  of  Aurangzeb, 
and  the  Emperor  Muhammad  Shah,  granted  sanads  to  the  family,  copies 
of  which  are  in  existence.  During  the  palmy  days  of  the  Mughal  Empire 
the  Raja  of  Bhadawar  was  reckoned,  with  the  Rajas  of  Jaipur,  Jodhpur, 
and  Bundi,  as  one  of  the  four  Hindu  "Pillars  of  the  Empire";  and  the 
history  of  the  family  is  full  and  interesting.  In  the  time  of  Lord  Lake's 
campaigns  against  the  Mahrattas,  and  subsequently,  the  Rajas  of  Bhadawar 
rendered  valuable  aid  to  the  British  arms.  The  late  Raja  Samait  Singh,  who 
died  without  issue  in  1840,  was  the  son  of  Raja  Partab  Singh;  and  the 
present  Maharaja  was  the  adopted  son  of  Raja  Samait  Singh,  and  succeeded 
him.  The  Maharaja  "  showed  conspicuous  zeal  and  loyalty  "  during  the  period 
of  the  Mutiny  of  1857  ;  his  levies  barred  the  way  of  the  mutineers  through  his 
territories,  and  successfully  guarded  the  ghats  of  the  Chambal  and  Jumna. 
Residence. — Naugaon,  Agra  District,  North- Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  299 


MAHESH  CHANDRA  CHAKRAVARTTI,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2pth  May  1886. 
Residence. — Jessore,  Bengal. 


MAHESH  CHANDRA  NYAYARATNA,  C.I.E., 

Mahdmahopddhydya. 

The  title  of  Mahamahopadhyaya  was  conferred  as  a  personal  distinction 
on  1 6th  February  1887,  on  tne  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her 
Most  Gracious  Majesty,  for  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him 
to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Rajas.  The  Mahamahopad- 
hyaya, who  is  one  of  the  most  distinguished  Sanskrit  scholars  in  India, 
belongs  to  a  Kulin  Brahman  family  of  the  highest  rank,  the  Bhattacharyya 
family  of  Narit,  which  has  long  been  distinguished  for  the  zealous  cultivation 
of  Sanskrit  learning,  and  the  number  of  learned  Pandits  it  has  produced. 
His  father,  Harinarayana  Tarkasiddhanta,  and  his  two  uncles,  Guruprasada 
Tarkapanchanana  and  Thakurdasa  Chiiramani,  were  eminent  Pandits.  He 
married,  in  the  year  1848,  the  daughter  of  Pandit  Ram  Chand  Tarkabagis  of 
Sonagachi,  in  the  Jehanabad  subdivision  of  the  district  of  Hugli.  He  has 
a  brother,  Pandit  Madhabchandra  Sarbabhauina,  Sabha  Pandit  of  Moisadal 
Raj.  He  has  a  daughter  and  three  sons — Manmathanath  Vidyaratna,  M.A. 
(of  the  Financial  Department  of  the  Government  of  India),  born  April  1863; 
Munindranath  Bhattacharyya,  M.A.,  B.L.  (Vakil  of  the  High  Court  of 
Calcutta),  born  February  1868;  and  Mahimanath  Bhattacharyya,  B.A., 
born  April  1870.  He  was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent 
Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  24th  May  1881 ;  and  the  estimation  in  which 
he  is  held  by  Indian  scholars  is  marked  by  his  title  of  "  Nyayaratna."  He 
succeeded,  after  an  interval,  Professor  E.B.  Cowell  (now  Professor  of  Sanskrit 
in  the  University  of  Cambridge)  as  Principal  of  the  Sanskrit  College  of 
Calcutta.  During  the  tenure  of  the  Principalship  he  has  taken  the  initiative 
in  the  institution,  by  the  Government  of  Bengal,  of  an  examination,  called  the 
Sanskrit  Title  Examination,  for  the  conferment  of  titles  on  meritorious 
students  of  special  departments  of  Sanskrit  learning.  To  this  examination 
are  admitted  students  from  indigenous  institutions  (called  Chatuspathis  or 
Tols)  as  well  as  from  the  special  classes  that  have  been  organised  in  connec- 
tion with  the  Sanskrit  College.  The  Title  Examination  has  been  the  means 
of  stimulating  in  some  measure,  all  over  Bengal,  the  rather  waning  zeal 
for  the  cultivation  of  Sanskrit  learning.  The  titles  given — Nyayaratna, 
Vidyaratna,  etc. — are  those  of  the  ancient  Sanskrit  Pandits  in  the  Universities 
of  Nadiya,  Benares,  and  elsewhere.  He  has  edited,  with  copious  Notes,  the 
Kdvya  Prakds  ;  also  the  Mimdnsd  Darsana,  and  the  Black  Yajur  Veda.  He 
has  written  many  pamphlets,  such  as  Remarks  on  Daydnanda  Sarasvati's 
Veda-Bhdshya,  Tulasidhdrana  Mimdnsd,  The  Authorship  of  Mrichchhakatika, 
Lupta  Samvatsara.  He  has  done  much  for  the  general  encouragement  of 
Sanskrit  learning ;  and  also,  by  pecuniary  help  and  otherwise,  in  furtherance 
of  famine-relief,  the  promotion  of  education,  and  the  opening  out  of  means 
of  communication.  He  maintains  a  secondary  school  (a  High  Anglo- 
Sanskrit  School)  at  his  native  village  of  Narit ;  and  he  has  not  only  greatly 
improved  the  roads  in  and  near  about  this  village,  but  has  taken  a  leading 


3oo  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

part  in  the  opening  out  of  good  roads  and  tramways  in  his  native  District. 
The  Mahamahopadhyaya  is  a  Member  of  the  Bengal  Asiatic  Society,  the 
Indian  Association  for  the  Cultivation  of  Science,  the  Calcutta  University, 
the  Board  of  Examiners,  the  Central  Text  Book  Committee  of  Bengal,  the 
Behar  Sanskrit  Samaj  and  the  Anthropological  Society  of  Bombay ;  and  he 
has  lately  been  elected  a  Foreign  Member  of  the  Hungarian  Academy  of 
Sciences  at  Buda-Pesth.  He  is  also  Joint-Secretary  of  the  Hindu  Hostel 
Committee,  a  Member  of  the  Bethune  (Girls')  College  Committee,  and  a 
Visitor  of  the  Government  Engineering  College  at  Sibpur  in  the  neighbour- 
hood of  Calcutta. 

Residences. — Calcutta  ;  and  Ndrit,  Amta,  Howrah. 

MAHESH  SITLA  BAKHSH  SINGH  (of  Basti),  Rdjd. 

Born  1848.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Rajas  of  Basti  belonging  to  a 
Kshatriya  family  claiming  descent  from  a  scion  of  the  ancient  Rajas  of 
Kalhans.  The  founder  of  the  latter  family  was  Sej,  who,  with  Tej  his  brother, 
in  the  i4th  century  came  to  Oudh  and  conquered  the  territories  of  the 
Dom  Raja  of  Gonda.  Tenth  in  descent  from  Sej  was  Raja  Achal  Singh, 
who  granted  Basti  to  his  cousin,  ancestor  of  the  present  Raja.  The  Raja 
has  two  sons — Lai  Patesir  Partab  Narayan  Singh,  born  8th  August  1870  ;  and 
Babu  Bhavaneshwari  Partab  Narayan  Singh,  born  23rd  February  1873. 

Residence. — Basti,  North- Western  Provinces. 


MAHBSHWAR  PRASAD  SINGH,  Mahdrdj-kumdr  Rao. 

Is  the  brother  of  the  Maharaja  Bahadur  of  Gidhaur  in  Bengal.     Educated 
in  Sanskrit,  Persian,  Hindi,  and  English. 
Residence. — Gidhaur,  Bengal. 

MAHIMA  RANJAN  RAI  CHAUDHRI,  Rdjd. 

Born  3rd  February  1854.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February 
1887,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee*of  the  reign  of 
Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty.  The  Raja  is  the  son  of  the  late  Babu  Sambhu 
Chandra  Rai  Chaudhri.  Belongs  to  the  Chaudhri  family  of  Kakina,  Rang- 
pur,  whose  ancestors  first  settled  in  the  district  in  the  reign  of  Charles  I.,  at 
which  period  Rama  Nath  Chaki  was  in  the  service  of  the  Raja  of  Kuch 
Behar.  His  son,  Raghu  Ram,  became  the  Sendpati  or  Commander-in-Chief 
of  the  Kuch  Behar  forces.  His  son,  Ram  Narayan,  became  the  first  Zamin- 
dar  of  Kakina  under  the  Mughals  when  they  gained  possession  of  Rangpur 
in  1687,  and  obtained  the  title  of  Chaudhri ;  he  died  in  1710.  His  son, 
Raja"  Rai  Chaudhri,  and  his  grandson,  Rudra  Rai  Chaudhri,  followed  in  suc- 
cession;  the  latter  died  in  1768,  shortly  after  the  passing  of  Rangpur  into 
British  possession.  His  son,  Rasik  Rai  Chaudhri,  died  in  1770,  leaving  a 
minor  son  and  heir;  his  widow,  Alaknanda  Chaudhurani,  successfully  ad- 
ministered the  Zamindari  until  her  son,  Ram  Rudra  Rai  Chaudhri,  succeeded 
in  1784.  The  latter,  who  was  distinguished  as  a  philanthropist  and  scholar, 
died  in  1820,  and  was  succeeded  in  turn  by  his  eldest  son  and  grandson; 
the  latter  dying  without  issue  in  1850  was  followed  by  his  cousin  Sambhu 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  301 

Chandra  Rai  Chaudhri  (son  of  Ram  Rudra's  younger  son),  mentioned  above 
as  the  father  of  the  present  Raja.  He  was  renowned  as  a  Vedanta  scholar, 
and  a  friend  to  Sanskrit  learning ;  he  founded  a  Bengali  press,  and  kept  a 
number  of  Pandits  engaged  in  translating  Sanskrit  works  into  Persian,  and 
vice  versa.  His  son,  the  present  Raja,  educated  at  Rangpur  School,  suc- 
ceeded to  the  estate  as  a  minor ;  attained  his  majority  in  1871.  Has  founded 
several  schools  and  charitable  institutions ;  is  a  poet,  author,  and  speaker  on 
religious  and  political  subjects,  and  a  composer  of  many  national  songs.  He 
married  in  1868  Man  Mohini  Rai  Chaudhurani,  and  has  issue,  a  son,  Kumar 
Mahendra  Ranjan  Rai  Chaudhri,  born  igth  September  1874.  The  family 
crest  is  an  angel,  volant,  proper ;  the  motto — Nisi  Dominus  frustra. 
Residences. — Ra~jba"ri,  Kakina  ;  Rangpur,  Benares. 


MAHIP  SINGH  (of  SaJiyA),  Rdjd. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  Raja 
Hindi  Shah,  Gond  Raja  of  Garha-Mandla.  Belongs  to  a  family  claiming 
descent  from  Tej  Singh,  of  Tejgarh,  in  the  Damoh  district  of  the  Central 
Provinces.  Raja  Chandra  Hans  received  the  title  of  Raja,  and  some  lands 
in  the  Jabalpur  district,  from  Raja  Hindi  Shah  of  Garha-Mandla,  for  services 
rendered  in  demolishing  Nanagarh,  a  fort  in  the  Bilaspur  district.  Raja 
Chandra  Hans  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  who  was  the  father  of  the  present 
Raja. 

Residence. — Saliya",  Jabalpur,  Central.  Provinces. 


MAHIPATRAM  RUPRAM  NILKANTH,  C.I.B.,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  of  Rao  Saheb  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  the  26th 
March  1861.  The  Rao  Saheb  has  also  been  created  a  Companion  of  the 
Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire. 

Residence. — Ahmadabad,  Bombay. 


MAHLOG,  THAKUR  RAGHNATH  CHAND,  Thdkurof. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 86 1 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i6th  May  1880.  Belongs  to  a 
Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  the  Rajput  Chief  Rana  Hari 
Chand,  who  in  early  times  came  on  a  pilgrimage,  conquered  the  country,  and 
founded  the  State  of  Mahlog.  The  Gurkhas  overran  the  district  between 
1803  and  1815  ;  and  on  their  expulsion  in  the  latter  year  by  the  British 
Power,  the  Thakur  was  confirmed  in  the  possession  of  his  State  by  a  sanad 
from  the  British  Government,  dated  4th  September  1815.  Thirty-four 
generations  of  chiefs  intervened  between  Rana  Hari  Chand  and  the  late 
Thakur  Dalip  Chand,  who  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in.  1849,  and  died  in  1880. 
Mahlog  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States,  and  its  area  is  53  square  miles;  its 
population  about  9169,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Thakur  maintains  a  military 
force  of  30  men. 

Residence. — Mahlog,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 


302  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MAHMUD  JILANI,  SHAIKH,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

This  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty, 
for  eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar 
immediately  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


MAHMUD  KHAN,  MIR  (of  Kalat),  C.I.B. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the   Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1878. 

Residence. — Kala~t,  Baluchistan. 


MAHMUDABAD,  Rdjd  of.     See  Muhammad  Amir  Hasan  Khan. 
MAHOMED.     See  Muhammad. 
MAHOMET.     See  Muhammad. 


MAHTAB  KUNWAR  (of  Katiari),  Rdni. 

The  title  of  Raja  was  conferred,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  late 
Raja  Tilak  Singh  of  Katiari,  in  the  district  of  Hardoi,  Oudh,  on  the  23rd 
of  April  1878.  The  Raja  has  recently  died,  and  his  widow,  the  Rani,  has 
succeeded  him. 

Residence. — Katidri,  Hardoi,  Oudh. 


MAHTAB  SINGH  (of  Lidhran), '  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  a  descendant  of  Sardar  Jai  Singh, 
who  joined  the  Nishanwala  misl  or  confederacy  which  opposed  Zain  Khan, 
the  Governor  of  Sirhind,  who  was  slain  in  battle.  Sardar  Jai  Singh  obtained 
considerable  territories  in  Lidhran,  Ludhiana,  and  in  Kharar,  Ambala,  about 
1759  A.D.  On  the  invasion  of  Ahmad  Shah  Durani  he  fled  to  the  hills,  and 
lost  some  of  his  Ambala  possessions,  which  before  his  return  had  fallen  into 
the  hands  of  the  Mahardja  of  Patiala.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  only  son, 
Sardar  Charat  Singh,  who  had  three  wives,  by  each  of  whom  he  had  children, 
who  succeeded  to  his  estate  in  accordance  with  the  rule  of  Chanda  Vanda, 
which  is  the  custom  of  this  family.  Sardar  Mahtab  Singh  is  the  son  of  the 
Sardar  Budh  Singh,  who  was  born  in  1812,  and  rendered  excellent  service 
to  Government  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  for  which  he  received  a  suitable 
reward. 

Residence. — Lidhra'n,  Ludhidna,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  303 


MAIHAR,  RAJA  RAGHBIR  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1843;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1852.  Belongs  to  a 
Jogi  (mendicant  ascetic)  family  of  Hindus;  descended  from  Beni  Hazuri, 
who  was  in  the  service  of  the  Bundela  Raja  of  Panna,  and  ultimately  obtained 
from  his  master  thejdgir  of  Maihar,  with  the  title  of  Rais.  When  Baghel- 
khand  became  British  territory  by  the  Treaty  of  Bassein  in  1802,  Durjan 
Singh,  the  youngest  son  of  Beni  Hazuri,  was  in  possession  of  Maihar,  and 
he  was  confirmed  by  the  British  Government.  The  grandfather  of  the 
present  Raja  was  the  grandson  of  Durjan  Singh.  The  Raja  Raghbir  Singh 
obtained  the  title  of  Raja,  in  place  of  the  older  title  of  Rais,  on  1 4th  February 
1869;  he  has  a  son  and  heir,  named  Jadbir  Singh.  The  area  of  the  State 
is  400  square  miles;  its  population  is  71,709,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including 
more  than  10,000  belonging  to  aboriginal  tribes.  The  Raja  maintains  a 
military  force  of  8  cavalry,  227  infantry,  and  7  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a 
salute  of  9  guns. 

Residence. — Maihar,  Baghelkhand,  Central  India. 


MAING  KAING,  KUN  HMON,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  800  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Maing  Kaing,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


MAING  NAUNG,  KUN  TUN,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  900  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
mainly  of  Shans,  with  a  few  Yins. 

Residence. — Maing  Naung,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


MAING  PAN,  KUN  HLAING,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Sawbwa  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier. 
This  State  has  four  considerable  feudatory  States  on  the  other  side  of  the 
Salwin  river,  named  Maing  Han,  Maing  Sut,  Maing  Ta,  and  Maing  Tun. 
Including  these  its  area  is  about  3000  square  miles ;  and  most  of  the 
Sawbwa's  subjects  are  Shans. 

Residence. — Maing  Pan,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


304  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MAING  PUN,  KUN  TI,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Sawbwa  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  800  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
mainly  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Maing  Pun,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MAING  SEIK,  KUN  PWIN,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  4000  square  miles  (more  than  three-fourths  as 
large  as  the  kingdom  of  Saxony),  and  a  population  consisting  almost  entirely 
of  Shans. 

Residence. — Maing  Seik,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MAING  SHU,  KUN  MAHA,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  100  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
mainly  of  Shans,  with  a  good  many  Yins. 

Residence. — Maing  Shu,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


MAING  SIN,  KUN  KYAW,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  50  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
largely  of  Shans,  with  some  Yins. 

Residence. — Maing  Sin,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MAINPURI,  Rdjd  of.     See  Rampartab  Singh  of  Mainpuri,  Rdjd. 
MAJHAULI,  Rdjd  of.     See  Udai  Narayan  Mai  of  Majhauli,  Rdjd. 


MAKAT  SINGH,  Rao. 

Born  1832.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  on 
the  Thakur  ancestors  of  the  Rao  Makat  Singh  by  the  Raja  Gyan  Chand,  and 
having  long  been  recognised.  The  Rao  has  two  grandsons — Lai  Singh,  born 
28th  June  1869;  and  Ladan  Singh,  born  2nd  April  1874. 

Residence. — Cawnpur,  North-Western  Provinces. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  305 


MAKRAI,  RAJA  BHARAT  SAH,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1846;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  December  1866.  Belongs  to  a 
very  ancient  Gond  (aboriginal)  family,  in  which  the  title  of  "  Raja  Hatiya 
Rai,"  originally  conferred  by  the  Emperor  of  Delhi,  has  been  held  from  time 
immemorial.  The  Raja  is  entitled  to  be  attended  by  a  red-coloured  flag  as 
a  banner,  and  a  dhanka  or  drum.  The  State  has  an  area  of  155  square 
miles;  and  a  population  of  16,764,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Makrai,  Hoshangabad,  Central  Provinces. 


MAKSUD  ALI  KHAN,  MAULAVI,  Khan  Bahadur,  Wall  Kddr. 

Born  1 2th  July  1829.  The  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  was  conferred  on  ist 
January  1886,  and  that  of  Wali  Kadr  on  2nd  January  1888,  both  as  personal 
distinctions,  and  in  recognition  of  the  position  and  eminent  services  to  the 
Government  of  the  Maulavi  and  his  family.  Belongs  to  a  Pathan  (Umarkhel) 
family  of  the  Muhammadans,  long  resident  in  Shahjahanpur,  well  known 
for  their  loyalty,  many  members  of  which  have  rendered  good  service  in 
the  Judicial  Service,  The  Khan  Bahadur  was  appointed  to  the  Judicial 
Service  in  1851  ;  and  when  at  Gajner  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857  he  saved 
the  records  of  his  office  from  the  rebels.  On  retirement  from  the  Govern- 
ment service  he  acted  for  some  time  as  Chief  Justice  of  the  State  of  Bhopal. 

Residence. — Shdhjahdnpur,  North- Western  Provinces. 


MAKSUDANGARH,  RAJA  RAGHUNATH  SINGH,  Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1849;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  November  1865. 
Belongs  to  a  Khichi  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  Raja 
Durjan  Sal,  an  ancient  Khichi  chief  of  the  Rajputs.  The  State  is  a  feudatory 
of  Gwalior;  its  population  is  about  12,000,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Maksudangarh,  Bhopal,  Central  India. 

MALAISOHMAT,  U.  LAT  SINGH,  Sam  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1859  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  loth  April  1890.  The  Seim  is  Chief 
of  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  under  the  Chief  Commissioner 
of  Assam;  its  population  is  about  450,  consisting  chiefly  of  Khasis  and 
Christian  converts. 

Residence. — Malaisohmat,  Khdsi  Hills,  Assam. 


MALAK  RAJ,  Rai  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — 

x 


306  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MALBR  KOTLA,  HIS  HIGHNESS  NAWAB  MUHAMMAD 
IBRAHIM  ALI  KHAN  BAHADUR,  Nawdb  Bahadur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1858;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i6th  July  1871.  Belongs  to  an 
Afghan  family,  whose  ancestor,  Shaikh  Sadr-ud-din,  came  from  Kabul  about 
the  end  of  the  i5th  century,  and  obtained  in  marriage  a  daughter  of  the 
Afghan  Emperor  of  Delhi,  with  a  territory  in  the  province  of  Sirhind  as  her 
dowry.  Fifth  in  descent  from  him  was  Bazid  Khan,  who  obtained  the  title 
of  Nawab  from  the  Emperor  Alamgir,  and  founded  the  town  of  Maler  Kotla 
in  1657  A.D.  The  State  gradually  became  independent  during  the  decay  of 
the  Imperial  power  of  Delhi  in  the  i8th  century,  but  being  under  Afghan 
and  Muhammadan  rulers,  it  was  frequently  involved  in  feuds  with  its  Sikh 
neighbours,  and  especially  with  the  powerful  Chiefs  of  Patiala.  In  1732  the 
Nawab  Jamal  Khan  aided  the  Imperialist  troops  against  Raja  Ala  Singh  of 
Patiala;  and  again  in  1761  the  same  Nawab  aided  the  forces  of  Ahmad 
Shah  Durani  against  the  Sikhs.  Jamal  Khan's  son,  however,  the  Nawab 
Bhikan  Khan,  experienced  the  vengeance  of  the  Sikhs ;  and  being  hard 
pressed  by  the  forces  of  the  Raja  Amar  Singh  of  Patiala,  was  forced  to  sign 
a  treaty,  under  which  peace  ensued  for  many  years.  In  1787  the  Raja  of 
Patiala  aided  the  Nawab  of  Maler  Kotla  against  the  Sikh  Sardar  of  Bhadaur. 
In  1794  a  combination  of  Sikh  Sardars  attacked  Maler  Kotla  under  the 
Bedi  Saheb  Singh,  a  descendant  of  the  great  Sikh  Guru,  Baba  Nanak. 
The  Nawab  was  besieged  in  Maler  Kotla,  and  reduced  to  extremities,  when 
he  was  saved  from  destruction  by  the  intervention  of  the  Raja  of  Patiala. 
In  General  Lake's  campaigns  against  the  Mahrattas,  the  Nawab  of  Maler 
Kotla  joined  the  British  army  with  all  his  followers;  and  in  1809  was  taken 
under  British  protection,  and  guaranteed  against  the  encroachments  of  the 
Mahdraja  Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore.  The  late  Nawab,  Sikandar  Ali  Khan,  in 
1862,  obtained  the  assurance  of  the  British  Government  that  any  succession 
in  accordance  with  Muhammadan  law  would  be  respected ;  and  accordingly, 
when  he  died  without  issue  in  1871,  he  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Nawab, 
the  heir  of  a  collateral  branch  of  the  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  164 
square  miles;  its  population  is  about  71,000,  of  whom  the  Sikhs  number 
about  28,000,  the  Muhammadans  about  24,000,  and  the  Hindus  about 
16,000.  The  Nawab  enjoys  the  title  of  "His  Highness"  as  a  personal 
distinction.  He  maintains  a  military  force  of  60  cavalry,  228  infantry,  and 
6  guns ;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns,  including  2  guns  which  were 
added  to  the  salute  as  a  personal  distinction  on  ist  January  1877,  on  tne 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 

Residence. — Ma"ler  Kotla,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  -307 

MALHAR  RAO,  INGLI,  Rao. 

Born  1827.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  family  having  been  the  rulers 
of  Jabalpur  district  during  the  time  of  the  Mahratta  Government.  The  Rao 
possesses  a  sanad  of  the  time  of  the  Emperor  Shah  Alam,  which  styles  his 
ancestor  Raja  Ambaji  Bahadur  Ingli,  and  shows  that  at  a  Darbar  held  by 
the  Emperor  Shah  Alam  a  very  high  position  was  conferred  on  this  family, 
and  the  management  of  several  tdlukas  entrusted  to  them.  Rao  Gangadhar 
Ingli,  father  of  the  present  Rao,  was  ruler  of  Jabalpur  under  the  Mahratta 
Government. 

Residence. — Jabalpur,  Central  Provinces. 

MALIA,  THAKUR  MODHJI  MULVAJI,   Thdkur  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  ist  July  1846  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  23rd  June  1875.  Belongs 
to  the  great  Jareja  Rajput  (Hindu)  family  which  has  given  ruling  Houses  to 
Kutch,  Nawanagar,  and  Morvi ;  the  Malia  family  being  an  offshoot  of  the 
Morvi  branch.  The  Thakur  has  a  son  and  heir  named  Raisinghji.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  102  square  miles;  its  population  11,224,  chiefly  Hindus. 
The  Thakur  maintains  a  military  force  of  25  cavalry,  49  infantry,  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Malia,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay. 

MALLIBM,  HAIN  MANIK,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1843  y  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i6th  December  1868.  The  Seim  is 
Chief  of  one  'of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  under  the  Chief  Com- 
missioner of  Assam;  its  population  is  12,338,  consisting  chiefly  of  Khasis 
and  Christian  converts. 

Residence. — Malliem  (or  Mylliem),  KMsi  Hills,  Assam. 

MALPUR,  RAWAL  DIPSINGH JI  SHBOSINGHJI,  Rdwal  of.     '< 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1863;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  i2th  April  1882,  on  the  death  of 
his  father,  the  late  Rawal  Sheosinghji  Khumansinghji.  The  Rawal  belongs 
to  the  illustrious  family  of  the  Chiefs  of  the  Rahtor  clan  of  Rajputs,  claiming 
descent  from  the  legendary  hero  Rama  and  the  ancient  Rahtor  Emperors  of 
Kanauj  of  the  Suryavansi  or  Solar  race,  through  the  ancient  Raos  of  Idar. 
The  Rawal  is  the  direct  descendant  of  Rawal  Virajmal,  the  founder  of  the 
Malpur  State,  who  was  a  younger  son  of  Kirathsinghji,  eighth  Rao  of  Idar. 
The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  tributary  to  Baroda,  and  pays  kichri  to  Idar, 
is  324  square  miles;  its  population  14,009,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Mdlpur,  Ma"hi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

MAN,  MAUNG,  Thuye-gaung  Ngweda  ya  Min. 

The  title  (which  is  indicated  by  the  letters  T.D.M.  after  the  name)  is 
personal,  and  was  conferred  on  20th  May  1890.  It  means  "  Recipient  of 
the  Silver  Sword  for  Bravery." 

Residence. — Prome,  Burma. 


3o8  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MAN  SINGH,  C.I.E.,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent   Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1886. 
Residence. — Punjab. 

MAN  SINGH  (of  Sarwan),  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3ist  October  1879. 
Residence. — Ratla"m,  Central  India. 

MAN  SINGH,  SODHI,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1882,  as  a  personal  distinction. 
Residence. — Firozpur,  Punjab. 

MAN  SINGH,  THAKUR,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  of  Rai  Bahadur  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i2th  March 
1875,  m  recognition  of  the  excellent  services  rendered  by  the  Thakur  in  the 
famine  of  1873-74. 

Residence. — Sukpur,  Bha"galpur,  Bengal. 

MANA  SINGH  (of  Mokal),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Sardar  is  the  head  of  the  Mokal  family  of 
Sindhu  Jats,  whose  ancestors  rose  to  considerable  power  and  importance 
during  the  reign  of  the  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh.  Sardar  Bela  Singh  (cousin 
of  Sardar  Kahan  Singh,  Mana  Singh's  father),  with  his  son  Surjan  Singh, 
fought  on  the  Sikh  side  at  the  battles  of  Mudki,  Firuzshahr,  and  Sobraon  ; 
and  Bela  Singh,  severely  wounded  at  Sobraon,  was  drowned  in  the  Sutlej  in  the 
vain  attempt  to  ford  the  river  after  the  bridge-of-boats  had  been  broken  down. 
In  1858  Sardar  Mana  Singh  was  appointed  an  officer  of  the  5th  Banda 
Military  Police ;  and  in  September  he  greatly  distinguished  himself  by  the 
gallantry  with  which  he  led  his  troop  against  very  superior  numbers  of  the 
enemy — when  he  was  wounded  in  the  head,  and  his  horse  was  wounded 
under  him.  On  his  retirement  in  1861  he  was  made  Honorary  Police 
Magistrate  of  twenty-eight  villages  in  the  neighbourhood  of  his  ancestral  seat 
of  Mokal;  and  in  1862  received  a  considerable  grant  of  land.  He  has 
three  sons — (i)  Narayan  Singh,  born  1849;  (2)  Partab  Singh,  born  1852; 
(3)  Lai  Singh,  born  1855. 

Residence. — Mokal,  Lahore,  Punjab. 

MANA   VARMA   RAJA,    Rdjd.     See  Kadattanad. 


MANA   VIKRAMA   BAHADUR,    K.C.S.I.    (of  Calicut), 
Maharaja  Sir,  Zamorin.      See  Cajicut. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  309 


MANA  VIKRAMA  RAJA,  Rdjd,  The  Eralpad. 

Born  1832.  "The  Eralpad"  is  the  courtesy  title  borne  by  the  heir- 
apparent  to  the  Zamorin,  or  First  Raja  of  Calicut,  under  the  Marumakka- 
tayam  law  of  inheritance,  by  which  the  succession  goes  to  the  offspring  of 
the  female  members  of  the  family,  amongst  whom  the  eldest  male  is  the  heir- 
apparent.  The  Eralpad  bears  also  the  title  of  Second  Raja  of  Calicut  (see 
Calicut). 

Residence. — Calicut,  Malabar  District,  Madras. 

MANCHBRJI  KAWASJI  MARZBAN,  C.I.B.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  yth  July  1839.  The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  as  a 
personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India.  A  respected  member  of  the  Parsi 
community,  the  Khan  Bahadur  was  educated  at  the  Elphinstone  High  School, 
the  Poona  College,  and  the  Poona  School  of  Engineering.  Has  rendered 
distinguished  service  in  the  Public  Works  Department  of  Bombay,  is  a  C.E., 
and  the  Executive  Engineer  of  the  Presidency  City  of  Bombay,  in  recognition 
whereof  he  has  been  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of 
the  Indian  Empire,  as  well  as  Khan  Bahadur.  Is  a  J.P.  of  Bombay;  Fellow 
of  the  Bombay  University  ;  an  Associate  Member  of  the  Institute  of  Civil 
Engineering,  and  a  Fellow  of  the  Royal  Institute  of  British  Architects. 
Was  elected  President  of  the  Municipal  Corporation  of  the  City  of  Bombay  in 
April  1890.  Married  Gulbai,  daughter  of  Danaji  Kueeoji,  Mirza;  and  has 
issue,  a  son,  named  Murzban,  born  151)1  August  1858;  and  a  daughter, 
Mithibai,  married  to  Jehangir  D.  Mugasett,  Esq.,  of  Calicut. 

Residence. — B  ombay. 

MANCHBRJI  MBHRWANJI  BHAUNAGRI,  C.I.E. 

Has  acted  as  the  representative  of  His  Highness  the  Maharaja"  of 
Bhaunagar  on  many  important  occasions  in  England;  and  was  created  a 
Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  28th  June 
1886,  for  his  distinguished  services  both  to  the  State  of  Bhaunagar  and  to 
the  Indian  Empire.  Is  a  Member  of  Council  of  the  National  Indian 
Association  and  of  other  public  bodies. 

Residence. — Bhaunagar,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay ;  and  Northbrook  Indian  Club, 
London. 

MANCHBRJI  RUSTAMJI  DHOLU,  Khan  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  June  1888. 
Residence. — Aden. 

MANDAWAL,  RAWAT  KESRI  SINGH,  Rdwat  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born   1858  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1861.     Belongs  to  a 
Doria  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.     The  population  of  the  State  is  about  2000. 
Residence. — Manda"wal,  Western  Ma"lwa",  Central  India. 


3io  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MANDI,  HIS  HIGHNESS    RAJA  BUS  SAIN  BAHADUR, 

Rdjd  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1846;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  26th  January  1851. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family  of  the  Chandravansi  or  Lunar  race  ; 
whose  successive  Rajas  ruled  from  the  earliest  ages  over  the  combined  States 
of  Suket  and  Mandi,  until  the  year  1200  A.D.  About  that  time  the  reigning 
Chief  of  Suket,  named  Sahu  Sain,  quarrelled  with  his  younger  brother ;  the 
latter  left  Suket  to  seek  his  fortunes  elsewhere,  and  his  descendant,  Ajbar 
Sain,  founded  the  town  of  Mandi,  and  was  the  first  Raja  of  this  State.  At 
the  time  of  the  Gurkha  invasion  in  1803,  Isri  Sain  was  the  Raja  of  Mandi; 
he  submitted  to  the  invaders  on  condition  of  being  left  unmolested.  After 
the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas  by  the  British  Power  in  1815,  Mandi  came 
under  the  control  of  the  Superintendent  of  the  Hill  States  appointed  by  the 
Sikh  Government  of  Lahore;  and  it  suffered  greatly  from  the  turbulence 
of  the  Sikh  army  after  the  death  of  the  Maharaja  Ran  jit  Singh  in  1839. 
General  Ventura,  the  Sikh  commander,  invaded  the  State,  and  reduced  the 
celebrated  fort  of  Kamlagarh,  and  the  Raja  in  vain  besought  the  aid  of  the 
British.  But  at  last,  about  the  time  of  the  first  Sikh  war,  the  British 
Government  consented  to  intervene.  In  February  1846  the  Raja  Balbir 
Sain  formally  tendered  his  allegiance.  By  the  treaty  of  March  1846  with 
the  Sikhs,  Mandi  with  the  whole  of  the  Jalandhar  Doab  was  ceded  to  the 
British  Government ;  and  Raja  Balbir  Sain  in  October  of  the  same  year 
received  a  sanad,  confirming  him  in  his  possessions  under  conditions  of 
feudal  service.  Balbir  Sain  died  in  1851,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the 
present  Raja,  then  a  minor.  According  to  the  traditions  of  the  country 
there  were  at  one  time  no  fewer  than  300  fortresses  in  this  State ;  but  of 
these  only  about  ten  now  exist  in  any  preservation — the  most  famous  being 
the  hill-fort  of  Kamlagarh  mentioned  above.  The  area  of  the  State  is  1125 
square  miles;  its  population  is  about  140,000,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including 
more  than  2000  Muhammadans.  The  Raja  Bahadur  maintains  a  military  force 
of  25  cavalry,  1600  infantry,  and  10  guns;  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  n 
guns. 

Residence. — Mandi,  Punjab. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  311 

MANDVA,  RANA  JITSINGH JI,  Rdnd  'of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1877;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i3th  September  1890. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  7  square 
miles. 

Residence. — Mandva,  Rewa"  Ka"ntha,  Bombay. 

MANBSHWAR  BAKHSH  SINGH  (of  Mallanpur),  Rdjd. 

Born  1850.  The  title  of  the  family  having  been  originally  Rao,  that  of 
Raja  was  recognised  as  hereditary  in  1864,  when  the  present  Raja  succeeded 
to  it  as  a  minor.  Belongs  to  a  Raikwar  family,  descended  from  the  Raikwars 
of  Baundi  (see  Sarabjit  Singh,  Raja).  The  founder  of  this  branch" of  the 
family  was  Ratan  Singh.  About  the  year  1580  A.D.  the  family  acquired 
considerable  possessions  in  the  Sitapur  district ;  and  subsequently  extended 
their  territory  into  the  districts  of  Kheri  and  Bahraich.  Raja  Maneshwar 
Bakhsh  Singh,  Raikwar,  was  educated  at  Benares  and^  Lucknow  under  the 
Court  of  Wards,  by  whom  his  estates  were  managed  for  many  years.  He  is 
an  Honorary  Magistrate;  and  has  a  son  and  heir,  Kunwar  Debi  Bakhsh 
Singh. 

Residence. — Mallanpur,  Kheri,  Oudh. 

MANGAL,  RANA  JIT  SINGH,  Rdnd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1830;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  9th  November  1844. 
Belongs  to  a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  State  was  anciently  a  feudatory  of 
Kahlur  (q.v.} ;  but  after  the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas,  who  had  overrun  it 
from  1803  to  1815,  by  the  British  Power,  the  latter  declared  Mangal  to  be 
dependent  only  on  the  British  Government.  The  sanad  of  the  latter  is  dated 
2oth  December  1815.  The  Rana  has  a  son  and  heir,  named  Tilok  Singh. 
The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the  Simla  Hill  States,  is  13  square 
miles;  its  population  is  1060,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Rana  maintains  a 
military  force  of  2  5  men. 

Residence. —  Mangal,  Simla  Hills,  Punjab. 

MANGAL  SINGH,  C.I.B.  (of  Bhinai),  Rdjd  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  as  a  personal  distinction, 
on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as 
Empress  of  India. 

Residence. — Ajmir. 

MANGAL  SINGH,  THAKUR  (of  Garhi),  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  of  Rai  Bahadur  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  ist 
January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious 
Majesty  as  Empress  of  India. 

Residence. — Alwar,  Ra"jputa"na. 


3i2  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MANIBHAI  JASBHAI,  Diwdn  Bahadur,  His  Excellency. 
Prime  Minister  of  Baroda. 

Born  1844.  The  title  of  Diwan  Bahadur  was  conferred,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  on  3oth  October  1884.  His  Excellency  has  rendered  valuable 
service  to  His  Highness  the  Gaekwar,  to  His  Highness  the  Rao  of  Kutch, 
and  in  other  States  of  Western  India.  Belongs  to  a  Vadnagra  Nagar 
Brahman  family  of  Nariad  in  Gujarat.  In  1870  he  was  invited  by  His 
Highness  the  Nawab  of  Junagadh  to  a  seat  in  his  Council ;  and  becoming 
Chief  Justice  of  that  State,  he  introduced  important  reforms  in  the  Judicial 
and  Police  Departments.  Between  1872  and  1876  he  rendered  admirable 
service  as  native  assistant  to  the  Resident,  first  at  Palanpur,  and  then  at 
Baroda;  and  on  25th  September  1875,  at  a  public  Darbar  held  at  Baroda, 
the  title  of  Rao  Bahadur  was  conferred  on  him,  together  with  a  valuable 
khilat.  In  May  1876  Mr.  Manibhai  was  appointed  Diwan  of  Kutch,  at  the 
express  desire  of  His  late  Highness  the  Maharaja  Pragmalji,  then  Rao  of 
Kutch.  Here  he  introduced  great  and  most  beneficial  reforms  in  all 
departments,  especially  in  the  collection  of  the  revenue,  and  in  education 
and  sanitation  •  and  his  tact  and  judgment  largely  contributed  to  the  settle- 
ment of  a  long-standing  dispute  as  to  jurisdiction  between  the  Rao  and 
his  feudatories  of  the  Royal  House,  the  Bhayad.  In  1884  he  obtained  the 
title  of  Diwan  Bahadur,  with  a  valuable  khilat.  With  a  short  interval, 
during  which  he  returned  to  the  Baroda  Service,  he  administered  the  govern- 
ment of  Kutch  until  the  close  of  1885  ;  and  on  again  returning  to  Baroda, 
he  received  very  substantial  recognition  of  the  value  of  his  services  from 
His  Highness  the  present  Rao  of  Kutch.  For  more  than  four  years  he  was 
at  the  head  of  various  departments  in  Baroda;  and  in  May  1890  the 
Maharaja  Gaekwar  appointed  him  Diwan  or  Prime  Minister  of  that  great 
State.  In  Baroda  his  administration  has  been  thoroughly  successful,  and  he 
has  also  published  some  important  works  in  Gujarati  and  English.  He  has 
issue,  three  daughters  and  two  sons  —  Motibhai  (of  the  University  of 
Bombay),  aged  about  twenty-four ;  and  Hirabhai,  aged  about  fifteen. 

Residence. — Petlad,  Baroda  State. 


MANIKJI  KAWASJI  DOTIVALA,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  in  recog- 
nition of  eminent  services  rendered  to  the  Public  Works  Department  of 
Bombay,  2nd  January  1893. 

Residence. — Bombay. 


MANIPUR,  RAJA  CHURA  CHAND,  Rdjd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1886;  succeeded  to  \hzgadi  i8th  September  1891.  Belongs  to  a 
Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family,  descended  from  Raja  Churai  Romba,  who  obtained 
the  Raj  about  the  beginning  of  the  1 8th  century.  His  adopted  son  (formerly 
named  Pamheiba)  was  the  Raja  Gharib  Nawaz,  who  made  several  successful 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  313 

invasions  of  Burma.  In  the  time  of  his  grandson,  the  Raja  Jai  Singh  (alias 
Ching  Tung  Romba),  the  Burmese  invaded  Manipur ;  the  Raja"  was  com- 
pelled to  seek  British  aid,  and  a  treaty  was  concluded  in  1762.  Again  in 
1824,  in  the  reign  of  the  Raja  Gambhir  Singh,  the  State  was  overrun  by  the 
Burmese ;  but  the  latter  were  at  length  expelled  by  the  aid  of  British  levies, 
and  when  peace  was  concluded  in  1826  Gambhir  Singh  was  able  to  extend 
his  boundaries  by  the  inclusion  of  the  Kubo  valley.  The  latter  territory  was, 
however,  restored  to  Burma  in  1834.  In  that  year  the  Raja  Gambhir  Singh 
died,  and  the  State  subsequently  has  suffered  much  from  internal  dissensions 
and  frequent  changes  of  rulers.  These  disorders  at  length  became  unendur- 
able, and  in  1890  the  Government  of  India  resolved  to  put  an  end  to  them. 
The  first  attempt  to  intervene  was  disastrous,  as  it  was  attended  by  the, 
massacre  of  a  considerable  British  force,  including  some  high  officers  of 
State.  The  outrage  was  immediately  followed  by  condign  punishment,  and 
all  those  who  were  responsible  for  the  massacre  were  either  hanged  or  other- 
wise rigorously  dealt  with.  In  this  State  the  Prince  next  in  succession  to 
the  gadi  has  the  courtesy  title  of  Yuvardj  or  Jubardj,  and  the  next  in  dignity 
to  him  is  called  the  Sendpati  (sometimes  spelt  "  Senaputty ").  On  the 
deposition  of  the  late  Raja — who  had  enjoyed  the  title  of  Maharaja  as  a 
personal  distinction — these  persons  were  found  to  have  been  implicated  in 
the  recent  outrages,  and  were  punished  accordingly.  The  State  had  techni- 
cally lapsed,  on  account  of  the  rebellion ;  but  it  was  resolved  to  select  a 
youthful  Raja  from  among  the  descendants  of  the  ruling  family,  and  to 
continue  the  political  existence  of  Manipur  as  a  feudatory  State,  and  there- 
upon the  present  Raja  was  placed  on  the  gadi.  The  State  has  an  area  of 
about  8000  square  miles,  and  a  population  estimated  at  about  220,000, 
chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  about  4881  Muhammadans,  and  85,288 
belonging  to  various  Hill  tribes. 
Residence. — Manipur,  Assam. 


MANOHAR  SINGH  (of  Pathrala),  Sarddr. 

Born  1839.  The  title  is  hereditary.  Sardar  Diwan  Singh,  grandfather  of 
the  present  Sardar,  and  son  of  Sardar  Sohel  Singh,  about  the  year  1759  A.D. 
conquered  certain  territory  in  the  Jalandhar  district.  His  brother-in-law, 
Sardar  Baghel  Singh,  was  also  a  celebrated  Sikh  leader  of  those  days.  When 
the  Maharaja"  Ranjit  Singh  conquered  the  Jalandhar  Doab,  he  deprived  the 
family  of  much  of  their  possessions.  One  of  the  sons  of  Sardar  Diwan 
Singh  was  the  late  Sardar  Fateh  Singh,  father  of  the  present  Sardar.  Sardar 
Manohar  Singh  has  two  sons — Sardar  Sundar  Singh  and  Sardar  Dasaundha 
Singh. 

Residence. — Pathrdla,  Jdlandhar,  Punjab. 


MANSA,  BAWAL  SHRI  TAKHTSINGHJI,  Rdwal  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1877  j  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  i8th  May  1889.  Belongs 
to  a  Chaura  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  whose  founder,  Rawal  Sursinghji,  a  scion 
of  the  ancient  Chaura  Rajput  dynasty  that  reigned  at  Anhilwara  Patan,  746 


3i4  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

to  942  A.D.,  appears  to  have  obtained  an  assignment  of  territory  at  Mansa  on 
the  downfall  of  the  Anhilwara  Patan  dynasty.  The  late  Rawal  of  Mansa, 
Rajsinghji  Bhimsinghji,  was  fourteenth  in  descent  from  Sursinghji.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  73  square  miles;  its  population  is  13,299,  chiefly 
Hindus. 

Residence. — M£nsa,  Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

MANSHARAM  walad  WATANMAL,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i4th  January  1888. 
Residence. — S  eh  wan,  Sind. 

MAOIONG-,  JIT  SINGH,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1842;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  27th  August  1867.  The  Seim  is 
Chief  of  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  under  the  Chief  Com- 
missioner of  Assam;  its  population  is  1646,  consisting  chiefly  of  Khasis  and 
Christian  converts. 

Residence. — Maoiong,  Kha"si  Hills,  Assam. 

MAOSANRAM,  SAM  BURAI,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1877;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  28th  March  1890.  The 
Seim  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  under  the  Chief 
Commissioner  of  Assam;  its  population  is  1104,  consisting  chiefly  of  Khasis 
and  Christian  converts. 

Residence. — Maosanram,  Khdsi  Hills,  Assam. 

MARDAN  SINGH  (of  Pind&rna),  Thdkur. 

Born  1854.  The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  granted  by 
the  Raja  Mardan  Singh  of  Garha-Mandla  to  an  ancestor  of  this  family  named 
the  Rawat  Parshad,  who  had  saved  his  (the  Raja's)  life  from  the  Raja  of 
Tehri.  Belongs  to  the  same  family  as  that  of  the  Thakur  Gaya  Parshad  of 
Sagar. 

Residence. — Pinddrna,  Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

MARIAO,  BUROM,  Seim  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1863;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  May  1888.  The  Seim  is  Chief 
of  one  of  the  Khasi  and  Jaintia  Hill  States,  under  the  Chief  Commissioner 
of  Assam ;  its  population  is  3669,  consisting  chiefly  of  Khasis  and  Christian 
converts. 

Residence. — Mariao,  Khdsi  Hills,  Assam. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  315 


MARTAND  WAMAN  SHOTRI,  Rao  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 


MARWAR,  His  Highness  the  Mahdrdjd  of.     See  Jodhpur. 


MASUD  ALI  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  Prince  is  the  twelfth  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh,  and  bears  the 
title  as  the  courtesy  title  of  his  high  rank. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


MATA  DIN,  Rai  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890.  The  Rai 
Bahadur  has  rendered  long  and  meritorious  services  to  Government  in  the 
Judicial  Department,  and  was  for  some  time  Subordinate  Judge  of  Muzaf- 
farpur. 

Residence. — Patna,  Bengal. 


MATHWAR,  RANA  RANJIT  SINGH,  Rdnd  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1 86 1  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  in  1865.  Belongs  to  a 
Bhilala  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  140  square  miles;  its 
population  is  about  2630,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Mathw^r,  Bhopa"war,  Central  India. 


MAUKMB,  KUN  HMON,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Sawbwa  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  2500  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
almost  entirely  of  Shans,  but  with  some  Yms. 

Residence. — Maukme,  Shan  States,  Burma. 


MAULADAD  KHAN  walad  WALIDAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MAUNG  MAN,  KUN  WA,  Myoza  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Myoza  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  25  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting  almost 
entirely  of  Shans,  but  with  some  Yins. 

Residence. — Maung  Man,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MAYA  DAS,  Rai. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on   i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Firozpur.  Punjab. 

MAYARAM  SHAMBHUNATH,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  28th  June  1878. 
Residence. — Surat,  Bombay. 


MEGHRAJ  KOTHARI,  alias  MEGHRAJ  OSWAL 
(of  Murshidabad,  Bengal),  Rat  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  8th  October  1867,  for  services 
rendered  to  Government  during  the  Bhutan  war. 

Residences. — Goalpdra,  Assam  ;  and  Azamganj,  Murshidabad. 


MEHDI  ALI,  Nawdb  Mohsin-ul-Mulk. 

The  Nawab  is  at  present  Secretary  to  the  Government  of  His  Highness 
the  Nizam  of  the  Deccan.  For  distinguished  services  to  that  Government  His 
Highness  was  pleased  to  confer  on  him  the  title  of  Nawab  Mohsin-ul-Mulk. 
The  Nawab  has  occupied  some  of  the  most  responsible  posts  in  the  State 
of  Hyderabad,  in  whose  service  also  he  has  visited  Europe,  with  his  colleague 
the  Nawab  Mehdi  Hasan,  Fateh  Nawaz  Jang  Bahadur,  and  received  the  high 
acknowledgments  both  of  His  Highness  the  Nizam  and  of  the  British 
Government. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Deccan. 


MEHDI  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Nawab  Bahadur  being  the  son  of  Nawab  Jafar 
Ali  Khan,  who  was  the  grandson  of  a  daughter  of  Saadat  Khan,  Burhan-ul- 
Mulk,  King  of  Oudh.  The  Nawab  Bahddur  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  in 
Oudh. 

Residence. — Oudh. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  317 


MBHDI  HASAN,  Nawdb  Fateh  Nawaz  Jang  Bahadur. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  is  at  present  Home  Secretary  to  the  Government  of 
His  Highness  the  Nizam  of  the  Deccan,  having  been  promoted  to  that  office 
from  the  high  and  responsible  post  of  Chief  Justice  of  Hyderabad.  For 
distinguished  services  to  that  Government  His  Highness  was  pleased  to 
confer  on  him  the  title  of  Nawab  Fateh  Nawaz  Jang  Bahadur.  The  Nawab, 
who  is  well  known  as  a  powerful  writer  in  the  Times  and  other  organs  of 
public  opinion,  has  been  identified  with  some  of  the  most  important  and 
valuable  reforms  in  the  State  of  Hyderabad,  in  whose  service  also  he  has 
visited  Europe,  with  his  colleague  the  Nawab  Mehdi  Ali  Mohsin-ul-Mulk,  and 
received  the  high  acknowledgments  both  of  His  Highness  the  Nizam  and  of 
the  British  Government. 

Residence. — Hyderabad,  Deccan. 


MEHDI  HASAN  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Nawab  Bahadur  being  the  son  of  Ikhtiar-ud- 
daula,  grandson  of  Saadat  Ali  Khan,  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — O  udh. 


MEHDI  HASAN  KHAN,  MIRZA,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Nawab  Bahadur  having  married  the  daughter 
of  a  daughter  of  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh.  The  Nawab 
Bahadur  is  the  son  of  Mirza  Ali  Jah  Bahadur. 

Residence. — Oudh. 


MEHDI  HUSAIN  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  Nawab  Bahadur  is  the  son  of  Mirza  Wala  Jah  Bahadur,  and 
holds  this  courtesy  title  as  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  Kings  of  Oudh. 
The  Mirza  Wala  Jah  Bahadur's  grandfather  was  the  grandson  of  the  son  of 
one  of  the  daughters  of  Saadat  Khan,  Burhan-ul-Mulk,  King  of  Oudh. 

Residence. — O  udh . 


MEHR,  SINGH,  CHHACHI,  Sardar. 

Born  1857.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  the  head  of  a 
Kohli  Kshatriya  family,  whose  ancestor,  Sardar  Tehil  Singh,  came  long 
ago  from  Bhatneo,  settled  at  Salargarh  in  Chhach  in  the  Rawalpindi  district 
of  the  Punjab,  and  made  considerable  conquests.  A  descendant  of  Sardar 
Tehil  Singh,  named  Sardar  Jiwan  Singh,  entered  the  service  of  the  Maharaja 
Ranjit  Singh  of  Lahore ;  served  with  credit  at  Bannu,  Tank,  Mitha  Tiwana, 


3i8  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

and  elsewhere;  and  for  eight  years  was  stationed  at  Dera  Ismail  Khan. 
During  the  rebellion  of  1848  Sardar  Jiwan  Singh,  with  his  son  Sardar 
Gurdit  Singh  (father  of  the  present  Sardar),  rendered  excellent  service  to  the 
Government ;  they  joined  Lieutenant  (afterwards  Sir  Herbert)  Edwardes,  and 
served  under  him  to  the  end  of  the  war.  Sardar  Jiwan  Singh  died  in  1852, 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sardar  Gurdit  Singh,  who  again  rendered 
admirable  service  to  the  Government  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  eldest  son,  the  present  Sardar. 
Residence. — Jhelum,  Punjab. 


MBHR-ULLA  KHAN,  SARDAR,  Nawdb. 

The  title  of  Nawab  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1890. 
Residence. — Baluchistan. 

MEHRAN  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1889. 
Residence. — Upper  Sind  Frontier  District. 

MBHRJIBHAI  KUVARJI  TARAPURWALA,  C.I.B. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  24th  May  1888. 

Residence. — B  ombay. 


MEMA  MAL,  LALA,  Rai  Bahddur. 

Born  1838.  The  title  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  in  recognition  of  long  and  meritorious  service  to  the  Govern- 
ment in  the  Ordnance  Department,  especially  during  the  Afghan  campaigns 
of  1878-79-80.  Belongs  to  a  Khatri  family  settled  in  the  Delhi  district; 
son  of  the  late  Lala  Ghazi  Ram  of  Delhi.  Educated  in  the  Delhi  College ; 
appointed  to  the  Ordnance  Department  in  1859. 

Residences. — Calcutta,  Bengal ;  and  Chipiwdra,  Delhi,  Punjab. 

MBNGNI,  JARBJA  MADHAVASINGHJI  MANSINGHJI, 

Tdlukddr  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1847;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  T.  2th  September  1864.  Belongs  to 
a  Rajput  (Hindu)  family.  The  area  of  the  State  is  34  square  miles ;  its 
population  is  3454,  chiefly  Hindus.  The  Talukdar  maintains  a  military 
force  of  2  2  infantry  and  3  guns. 

Residence. — Mengni,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay. 

MEWAR,  His  Highness  the  Mahdrdnd  of.     See  Udaipur. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  319 


MIDNAPUR,  RAJA  MAHENDRA  LAL  KHAN,  Rdjd  of. 

Born  ist  September  1843.  The  title  of  Raja  was  conferred  on  i6th 
February  1887,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of 
the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty,  in  recognition  of  his  "public 
spirit  and  liberality  on  many  occasions."  Belongs  to  the  family  of  the 
Zamindars  of  Narajol,  descended  from  Udaya  Narayan  Ghosh,  which 
family  has  held  possession  (with  one  interruption)  of  the  Midnapur  Raj  since 
the  time  of  the  Raja  Ananda  Lai  Khan  (June  1800),  who  was  the  elder 
brother  of  the  grandfather  of  the  present  Raja.  Just  before  the  close  of  the 
last  century,  Trilochan  Khan  of  Narajol  was  called  in  to  aid  the  Ranis — 
widows  of  the  Raja  Ajit  Singh,  the  last  of  the  older  line  of  Midnapur  Rajas. 
Trilochan  Khan  was  the  first  cousin,  on  the  mother's  side,  of  the  Raja 
Jeswant  Singh,  father  of  Raja  Ajit  Singh.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  nephew 
Sitaram  Khan,  who  in  turn  was  succeeded  by  his  sons,  Ananda  Lai  Khan, 
Nanda  Lai  Khan,  and  Mohan  Lai  •  Khan.  Ananda  Lai  Khan  at  length 
succeeded  to  the  whole  of  the  Midnapur  Raj.  The  family  has  had  the 
misfortune  of  being  involved  in  frequent  and  heavy  litigation.  Raja  Mohan 
Lai  Khan  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Raja  Ajudhya  Ram  Khan,  father  of 
the  present  Raja,  in  1830.  In  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Procla- 
mation of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress,  he  received  a  Certificate 
of  Honour.  He  died  in  1879,  and  was  succeeded  by  the  present  Raja, 
who  is  a  distinguished  musician,  and  the  composer  of  several  Hindu  musical 
works.  When  the  Raja  in  1887  was  invested  with  the  title,  the  Lieutenant- 
Governor  of  Bengal,  after  addressing  him  in  terms  of  eulogy,  added :  "  I 
take  pleasure  in  investing  you  with  the  well-earned  dignity  which  the 
Viceroy  has  bestowed  on  you ;  the  representative  of  a  very  ancient  family 
in  Midnapur,  which  received  its  honours  from  the  Mughal  Government,  you 
have  devoted  your  wealth  and  influence,  as  your  father  did  before  you, 
to  the  service  of  your  fellow-countrymen.  In  endowments  and  donations 
to  schools,  libraries,  and  hospitals,  in  the  construction  of  the  Narajol  em- 
bankment, and  above  all  in  the  remission  of  rents  to  your  tenantry  in  bad 
years,  you  have  set  a  noble  example."  The  Raja  has  a  son  and  heir, 
named  Narendra  Lai  Khan,  born  i7th  September  1867. 

Residence. — Midnapur,  Bengal. 


MIR  HUMAYUN  JAH,  BAHADUR,  C.I.B. 

Was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian 
Empire,  ist  January  1880. 

Residence. — Madras. 


MIR  KHAN,  SAYYID,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  in  1858. 
Residence. — Bulandshahr,  North- Western  Provinces. 


32o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MIR  WAZIR  ALI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  Khan  Bahadur  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate  of  Lucknow ;  and  for 
his  public  services  received  the  title  as  a  personal  distinction  on  2$th  May 
1892. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 


MIRAJ  (Senior  Branch),  GANGADHAR  RAO  GANPAT,  alias 
BALA  SAHBB  PATWARDHAN,  Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1866 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  6th  June  1875.  Belongs 
to  the  Patwardhan  (Brahman)  family,  to  whose  ancestor,  Govind  Hari 
Patwardhan,  the  grant  of  the  Miraj  State,  with  the  title  of  Sardar,  was  made 
by  the  Peshwa  Madhava  Rao  in  1764  A.D.  In  1820  the  State  was 
divided  into  four  shares,  of  which  two  lapsed  in  1842  and  1845  respectively. 
Of  the  two  that  remain  as  feudatory  States,  the  present  Chief  of  the  senior 
branch  was  educated  at  the  Rajkumar  College,  Indore,  and  ranks  as  a 
First  Class  Sardar  in  the  Southern  Mahratta  country.  The  area  of  the 
State  is  320  square  miles;  its  population  is  69,732,  chiefly  Hindus,  but 
including  7473  Muhammadans.  The  Chief  maintains  a  military  force  of 
5 1  cavalry,  494  infantry,  and  7  guns. 

Residence. — Miraj,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 


MIRAJ  (Junior  Branch),  LAKSHMAN  RAO  HARIHAR,  alias 
ANNA  SAHEB  PATWARDHAN,  Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Is  a  minor,  being  the  son  of  the  late  Harihar  Rao  Dada  Saheb,  who 
was  born  in  1833,  and  succeeded  to  the  gadi  5th  February  1876.  Belongs 
to  the  Patwardhan  (Brahman)  family,  to  whose  ancestor,  Govind  Hari 
Patwardhan,  the  Peshwa  Madhava  Rao  in  1764  A.D.  granted  the  Miraj 
State  with  the  title  of  Sardar.  In  1820  the  State  was  divided  into  four 
shares,  of  which  two  lapsed  in  1842  and  1845  respectively.  Of  the  two 
that  remain  as  feudatory  States,  the  present  Chief  of  the  junior  branch  is 
the  grandson  of  the  late  Lakshman  Rao  Anna  Saheb,  who  was  the  grandson 
of  Gangadhar  Rao  Govind,  son  of  the  above-mentioned  Govind  Hari 
Patwardhan,  founder  of  the  State.  The  family  banner  is  known  as  bhagwaj- 
henda,  and  is  an  ensign  of  a  red  colour ;  and  the  Chief  is  entitled  to  be 
attended  by  danka  (kettledrums),  pdlki  (State  palanquin),  lagi  (flags),  and 
other  marks  of  dignity.  The  area  of  the  State  is  207  square  miles;  its 
population  is  30,541,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  1667  Muhammadans. 
The  Chief  maintains  a  military  force  of  25  cavalry,  253  infantry,  and 
5  guns- 

Residence. — Miraj,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  321 


MIRZA  HAIRAT,  PROFESSOR,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  a  personal  one,  and  was  conferred  on  25th  May  1892,  in 
recognition  of  his  eminent  attainments  in  oriental  scholarship.  It  entitles 
him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar  immediately  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Elphinstone  College,  Bombay. 


MIT  SINGH  (of  Dhandwal),  Sarddr. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Sardar  being  descended  from  a  Jat  leader, 
Sardar  Man  Singh,  who  conquered  the  territory  of  Dhandwal,  in  the  district 
of  Hoshiarpur,  about  the  year  1759  A.D. 

Residence. — Jalandhar,  Punjab. 

MITHAN  LAL,  PANDIT,  Rai  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i3th  November  1884. 
Residence. — Delhi,  Punjab. 

MITRA,  A.,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Rai  Bahadur,  as  a  personal  distinction,  for  eminent 
medical  services  in  Kashmir,  2nd  January  1893.  Is  L.R.C.P.  and  L.R.C.S. 
of  Edinburgh. 

Residence. — Kashmir. 

MOBYB,  KUN  YAN,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Sawbwa  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States  on  the  Burma  frontier, 
which  has  an  area  of  about  1000  square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting 
almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Mobye,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MOHAN  LAL,  SAH,  Rai  Bahadur. 

Born  1841.  The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty,  in 
recognition  of  his  loyalty  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  of  his  eminent 
services  on  the  Local  and  District  Boards.  He  belongs  to  an  important 
Brahman  family  long  settled  in  the  district  of  Agra. 

Residence. — Agra,  North- Western  Provinces. 

MOHANLAL  RANCHORDAS  JHAVBRI,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  August  1888. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

Y 


322  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MOHANPUE,  THAKUR  HIMMATSINGHJI  UMBDSINGHJI, 

Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1876;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  6th  October  1882. 
Belongs  to  a  Puar  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  the  ancient 
Raos  of  Chandrawati  near  Mount  Abu  in  Rajputana.  Jaspal,  the  founder 
of  this  branch  of  the  family,  moved  from  Chandrawati  to  Harol  in  Mahi 
Kdntha  in  1226  A.D.  Thirteen  generations  later  Thakur  Prithwi  Raj 
moved  to  Ghorwara.  The  late  Thakur,  Umedsinghji  Daulatsinghja,  was 
born  in  1854,  succeeded  to  the  gadi  in  1875,  and  died  in  1882.  The 
area  of  the  State  is  560  square  miles;  its  population  is  14,677,  chiefly 
Hindus.  It  is  tributary  to  Baroda,  and  pays  kichri  to  Idar. 

Residence. — Mohanpur,  Mahi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

MOHARBHANJ,  RAJA  SRIRAM  CHANDRA  BHANJ  DEO, 

Raj  a  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1872  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  29th  May  1882.  Belongs 
to  a  Kshatriya  (Hindu)  family,  claiming  descent  from  Adhi  Bhanj,  said  to 
have  been  a  Kachhwaha  Rajput,  and  a  connection  of  the  then  Raja  of  Jaipur. 
Adhi  Bhanj  is  believed  to  have  come  from  Rajputana  into  Orissa  about 
2000  years  ago,  and  gradually  to  have  established  his  authority  over  the 
country  between  the  Subarnarekha  river  and  the  borders  of  Dhenkanal. 
Subsequently  a  member  of  the  Moharbhanj  family  named  Joti  Bhanj 
established  himself  in  the  southern  part  of  this  territory  as  Raja  of 
Keunjhar,  and  Adhi  Bhanj  retained  the  country  between  the  Subarnarekha 
and  Baitarani  rivers,  which  is  Moharbhanj  proper.  Thirty-nine  generations 
of  Rdjas  intervened  between  Adhi  Bhanj  and  the  late  Raja,  Krishna 
Chandra  Bhanj  Deo,  who  was  granted  the  title  of  Maharaja,  as  a  personal 
distinction,  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of 
Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of  India — as  also  his  grandfather, 
the  Raja  Jadunath  Bhanj  Deo,  had  many  years  before  been  granted  the  same 
personal  distinction  for  his  service  in  quelling  a  rebellion  in  the  Kolhan. 
The  eldest  son  and  heir-apparent  of  the  Raja  in  this  State  is  entitled  to  the 
courtesy  title  of  "  Tikait  Babu " ;  and  the  family  cognisance  is  the  sacred 
peacock  with  tail  spread.  The  area  of  the  State,  which  is  one  of  the  Orissa 
Tributary  Mahals,  is  4243  square  miles;  its  population  is  385,737,  nearly 
equally  divided  between  Hindus  and  aboriginal  tribesmen.  The  Raja 
maintains  a  military  force  of  5 1 2  infantry  and  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Moharbhanj,  Orissa,  Bengal. 

MOHI-UD-DIN  SHARIF,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1878,  for  dis- 
tinguished medical  services.  The  Khan  Bahadur  has  been  made  an 
Honorary  Surgeon. 

Residence. — Madras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  323 


MOHKAM  SINGH  (of  Partdpner),  Rdjd. 

Born  2oth  January  1864.  The  title  is  hereditary,  dating  from  a  time 
before  the  Muhammadan  Empire.  The  Raja  is  one  of  the  Chiefs  of  the 
illustrious  Chauhan  clan  of  Rajputs,  boasting  a 
lineal  descent  from  Prithvi  Raja,  Chauhan  Raja 
of  Ajmir  and  Delhi,  the  last  Hindu  Emperor. 
In  the  1 3th  or  early  in  the  1/j.th  century  the 
Raja  Sumar  Sah  (grandson  of  Karan  Singh,  son 
of  Prithvi  Raja)  conquered  the  Meos  in  Etawah, 
Cawnpore,  and  the  surrounding  districts,  and 
established  himself  as  Raja  in  the  western  part 
of  the  Etawah  district.  His  descendants  built 
the  great  fort  of  Etawah;  but  when  that  was 
e  Santa*  of  the  Chauhan  captured  by  the  Mahrattas  under  Hari  Pant,  the 

Rajputs,  called  diakra,  used  f.  ,  /  ' 

in  the  seal  and  for  signature.     Raja    Partao    Singh,    the    then    Chief,    built    the 
(A  circle  with  four  Trisuias  or    existing     fort     of    Partapner.       The     late     Raja, 

Indents  as  radii  at  the  car-      T     .  .     °         _,.       .  ,  .  J    ' 

dinai points.)  .Lokinara  Singh,  succeeded  as  a  minor;  his  uncle 

and  guardian,  Zohar  Singh,  rendered  good  service 

to  the  Government  during  the  Mutiny  of  1857.      The  present  Raja  suc- 
ceeded on  the  death  of  his  father,  Raja  Lokindra  Singh. 
Residence. — Parta"pner,  Etdwah,  North- Western  Provinces. 

MOMEIK,  KUN  MAUNG,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1883.  Tne  Sawbwa  is  Chief  of  one  of  the  Shan  States,  on  the 
Burma  frontier.  Succeeded  recently  to  the  chiefship  as  a  minor;  and 
during  his  minority  the  State  is  administered  by  the  Chief  Commissioner  of 
Burma.  The  area  of  the  State  is  about  2100  square  miles;  its  population 
consists  almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Momeik,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MONB,  KUN  KYI,  K.S.M.,  Sawbwa  of. 
A  Ruling  Chief. 

The  Sawbwa  has  received  from  the  Viceroy,  as  representing  Her  Majesty 
the  Empress,  the  honour  of  K.S.M.  (Kyet  Thaye  zaung  shwe  Salwe  ya 
Min,  meaning  "Recipient  of  the  Gold  Chain  of  Honour"),  for  the  good 
services  rendered  by  him  to  the  Imperial  officers,  and  his  good  adminis- 
tration. He  is  the  Chief  of  one  of  the  most  important  of  the  Shan  States, 
Burma ;  which,  with  its  feudatory  Kyaing  Ton,  has  an  area  of  about  3000 
square  miles,  and  a  population  consisting  almost  entirely  of  Shans. 

Residence. — Mone,  Shan  States,  Burma. 

MORESHWAR  RAO,  Rao  Saheb. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Rao  Saheb  being  the  descendant  and  repre- 
sentative of  Rao  Vinayek  Rao,  who  was  the  Prime  Minister  of  the  old 
Mahratta  Government  of  Sagar.  He  had  originally  come  from  the  Deccan, 


324  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

and  having  been  appointed  a  Mamlatdar  by  the  Mahratta  Government, 
ultimately  rose  to  be  Prime  Minister.  The  family  also  held  the  title  of 
Subahdar  under  the  Mahrattas.  The  late  Rao  Saheb  Kishan  Rao  was  born 
in  1824,  and  was  an  Honorary  Magistrate.  He  died  recently,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  Rao  Saheb. 
Residence. — Sa"gar,  Central  Provinces. 

MOBO  GOPAL  PANDHARI,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1883. 
Residence. — Poona,  Bombay. 

MOBO  KBISHNA  DABHOLKAB,  Rao  Saheb. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1882. 
Residence. — Ahmadnagar,  Bombay. 

MOBOBA  KESHBI  NATH  SBNJIT,  Rao  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2nd  January  1888. 
Residence. — Bombay. 

MOBVI,  HIS  HIGHNESS  THAKUB  SAHEB  SIB  WAGHJI 

BAVAJI,  K.C.I.E.,  Thdkur  Saheb  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  i  yth  April  1858 ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  zyth  February 
1870.  Belongs  to  the  illustrious  Jareja  Rajput  (Hindu)  family,  that  has  also 
given  ruling  Houses  to  Kutch,  Nawanagar,  Malia,  and  other  States ;  the 
Thakur  Saheb  of  Morvi  is  also  Jagirdar  of  Amerdi,  in  Kutch,  which  possesses 
a  port  named  Jangi.  He  was  educated  at  the  Rajkumar  College,  has 
visited  Europe,  and  administers  the  affairs  of  his  State  in  person.  The 
State,  which  is  tributary  to  Baroda  and  Junagarh,  has  an  area  of  821  miles ; 
and  a  population  of  89,964,  chiefly  Hindus,  but  including  11,942  Muham- 
madans.  His  Highness  maintains  a  military  force  of  121  cavalry,  1155 
infantry,  and  7  guns,  and  is  entitled  to  a  salute  of  1 1  guns. 

Residence. — Morvi,  Ka'thia'wa'r,  Bombay. 

MOBWABA,  Thdkur  of.     See  Tharad  and  Morwara. 

MOTA  BABKHEBA,  BHUMIA  BHABAT  SINGH,  Bhumia  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  1835.  Belongs  to  a  Bhilala  family;  the  Bhilalas  are  generally 
accounted  aboriginal,  but  according  to  some  accounts  are  the  descendants  of 
intermarriages  between  Rajputs  (Hindu)  and  Bhils  (aboriginal).  The  popu- 
lation of  the  State  is  about  4000. 

Residence. — Mota  Barkhera,  Bhopawaj,  Central  India. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  325 


MOTA  KOTHARNA,  THAKUR  PARBATSINGHJI,  Thdkur  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  ist  December  1848;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  on  the  death  of  his 
father,  the  late  Thakur  Hiraji,  6th  November  1864.  The  Thakur  claims  to 
be  descended  from  the  great  Chauhan  clan  of  Rajputs.  The  State  has  a 
population  of  595,  chiefly  Hindus. 

Residence. — Motd  Kotharna,  Mdhi  Kdntha,  Bombay. 

MOTI  SINGH  (of  Mandhata),  Thdkur. 

Born  3rd  December  1848.  The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Thakur  being  a 
descendant  of  the  ancient  Rajas  of  Mandhata.  The  founder  of  the  family 
was  the  Thakur  Chhattar  Singh. 

Residence. — Mandhata,  Nima"r,  Central  Provinces. 

MRA  U,  MAUNG,  Ahmudan  gaung  Tazeik-ya  Min. 

The  title  was  conferred,  as  a  personal  distinction,  on  2nd  January  1893. 
It  is  indicated  by  the  letters  A.T.M.  after  the  name,  and  means  "  Recipient 
of  the  Medal  for  Good  Service."  The  Maung  is  Extra  Assistant  Com- 
missioner and  Akunwan  of  Akyab,  Burma. 

Residence. — Akyab,  Burma. 

MUAZZIM  HUSAIN,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  as  a  personal  distinc- 
tion, on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious 

Majesty. 

Residence. — Barisal,  Bengal. 

MUBARAK  KHAN  walad  GHULAM  SHAH  KHAN,  Mir. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Hyderabad,  Sind. 

MUBARAK  KHAN  walad  WALI  MUHAMMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

MUDHOL,  VYANKAT  RAO  BALWANT  RAO  RAJB 
GHORPARB,  alias  BALA  SAHBB,  Chief  of. 

A  Ruling  Chief. 

Born  9th  April  1861  ;  succeeded  to  the  gadi  as  a  minor  2yth  March 
1862.  Belongs  to  the  Bhonsle-Ghorpare  family;  which,  though  Mahratta, 
claims  descent  from  Chob  Rao,  said  to  have  been  a  son  of  the  Maharana  of 
Udaipur,  who  came  to  the  Deccan  in  very  early  times,  and  obtained  from 
the  King  of  Bijapur  the  territory  of  Mudhol  with  the  title  of  Raja.  The  family 


326  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

is  also  said  to  have  a  common  ancestor  with  Sivaji  the  Great,  the  founder 
of  the  Mahratta  Empire.  The  second  family  name  of  Ghorpare  is  said  to 
have  been  given  because  one  of  its  ancestors  managed  to  scale  a  fort 
previously  deemed  impregnable,  by  attaching  a  cord  to  the  body  of  a 
ghorpad  or  iguana,  and  thereby  drawing  himself  up.  The  family  banner  is 
called  the  "  Bahuta " ;  and  is  a  triangular  flag  or  ensign  of  three  colours — 
white,  black,  and  green.  The  Chiefs  of  Mudhol  fought  against  Sivaji,  but 
ultimately  took  military  service  under  the  Peshwas.  Vyankat  Rao  I.,  the 
grandfather  of  the  present  Chief,  became  a  feudatory  of  the  British  Power. 
He  died  in  1854,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Balwant  Rao;  who  died  in 
1862,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  Chief.  He  holds  the  rank 
of  a  First  Class  Sardar  of  the  Southern  Mahratta  Country.  His  State  has 
an  area  of  362  square  miles;  and  a  population  of  52,163,  chiefly  Hindus, 
but  including  3710  Muhammadans.  The  Chief  maintains  a  military  force 
of  20  cavalry,  387  infantry,  and  i  gun. 

Residence. — Mudhol,  Southern  Mahratta  Country,  Bombay. 

MUDIN  SHBRIF.     See  Muhi-ud-din  Sharif. 

MUHABAL  walad  GHULAM  NAJAP  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

MUHAMMAD  ABBAS,  MIRZA,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal.  The  Nawab  Bahadur  enjoys  it  as  the  husband  of 
a  grand-daughter  of  the  late  Saadat  AH  Khan,  King  of  Oudh.  He  is  the 
son  of  the  Nawab  Sharik-ud-daula. 

Residence. — Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  ABBAS,  MUFTI  MIR,  Shams-ul-Ulama. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty,  for 
eminence  in  oriental  learning.  It  entitles  him  to  take  rank  in  Darbar 
immediately  after  titular  Nawabs. 

Residence. — Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  ABBAS  HUSAIN  KASRA  BAKHT  MIRZA 
BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  is  the  courtesy  title  of  the  Prince,  as  twenty- 
fourth  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  ABDUL  ALI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1858.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  March 
1876,  the  Khan  Bahadur  being  a  son  of  Rashid-ud-daula,  half-brother  of  His 
late  Highness  Azim  Jah,  the  first  of  the  titular  Princes  of  Arcot. 

Residence. — Madras. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  327 


MUHAMMAD  ABDUL  BARI,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Born  1858.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  March 
1876,  the  Khan  Bahadur  being  a  grandson  of  Rashid-ud-daula,  half-brother 
of  His  late  Highness  Azim  Jah,  the  first  of  the  titular  Princes  of  Arcot. 

Residence. — Madras. 


MUHAMMAD  ABDULLA  BADSHAH  SAHEB,  HAJI, 
Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Madras. 


MUHAMMAD  ABDUR  RAHMAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal ;  it  was  conferred  by  the  Nawab  of  the  Carnatic, 
and  recognised  on  i6th  December  1890. 
Residence. — Madras. 

MUHAMMAD  ABU  TALIB  KHAN,  Majid-ud-dauld  Mumtdz-ul-Mulk 
Bahadur,  Rustam  Jang. 

The  title  is  personal;  it  was  originally  conferred  in  1838  by  the  late 
Muhammad  AH  Shah,  King  of  Oudh,  and  has  been  recognised  by 
Government.  Has  married  the  grand-daughter  of  the  late  Muhammad 
All  Shah,  King  of  Oudh ;  and  is  the  son  of  the  Nawab  Hashmat-ud- 
daula. 

Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  APZAL  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1881. 
Residence. — Dera  Ismail  Khdn,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  AFZAL  KHAN,  LIEUTENANT-COLONEL 
WAZIRZADA,  C.S.I.,  Nawab. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  8th  October  1886.  The 
Nawab  had  received  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur  on  $rd  August  1874;  and 
was  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India, 
24th  May  1881. 

Residence. — Peshdwar,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  AHMAD  ALI,  Nawab  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,    the    Nawab  Bahadur  being   the   son  of   Mirza 
Jalil-us-Shan,  grandson  of  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — O  u  dh. 


328  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MUHAMMAD  AJMAL,  SAYYID,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The    title    is    personal,    and  was  conferred  on   ist  January    1890,    for 
loyalty  and  good  services  rendered  to  Government. 
Residence. — Barh,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  AKBAR  KHAN,  ORAKZAI,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  24th  May  1881.     The  Khan 
Bahadur  belongs  to  an  Afghan  family  of  the  Orakzai  clan. 
Residence. — Peshdwar,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  AKRAM  HUSAIN  APSAR-UL-MULK  MIRZA 
BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  title  is  personal,  being  the  courtesy  title  of  this  nobleman  as  twenty- 
second  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  AKRAM  KHAN,  SIR,  K.C.S.I.  (of  Amb), 
Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  25th  September  1868.  The 
Nawab  Bahadur  is  Chief  of  Amb,  on  the  right  bank  of  the  Indus,  where  he  and 
his  ancestors  have  long  been  independent.  He  also  holds  Western  Tanawal, 
in  the  Hazara  district,  from  the  British  Government.  Belongs  to  a  Pathan 
(Muhammadan)  family ;  and  his  father,  Jahandad  Khan,  son  of  Painde 
Khan,  was  a  loyal  Chief,  who  rendered  good  service  in  the  time  of  the 
Mutiny  in  1857.  The  Nawab  Bahadur  Sir  Muhammad  Akram  Khan 
showed  active  and  gallant  conduct  in  the  field,  fighting  on  the  side  of  the 
British  Government,  and  rendered  effective  aid  during  the  disturbances  in 
Agror  on  the  Hazara  frontier.  In  recognition  of  these  services  he  was 
created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Exalted  Order  of  the  Star  of  India,  and 
given  the  title  of  Nawab,  in  1868;  and  subsequently  he  has  received  the 
higher  title  of  Nawab  Bahadur,  and  been  promoted  to  be  a  Knight 
Commander  of  the  same  Most  Exalted  Order. 

Residence. — Haza"ra,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI,  Mirza  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Mirza  Bahadur  being  a  son  of  Rafi-us-Shan 
Mirza  Muhammad  Naki  AH  Bahadur,  and  grandson  of  the  late  Muhammad 
Ali  Shah,  third  King  of  Oudh. 

Residence. — Oudh. 


MUHAMMAD  ALI,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Bangalore,  Mysore. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  329 

MUHAMMAD  ALI,  MIR,  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  ist  January  1877,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Proclamation  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty  as  Empress  of 
India. 

Residence. — Faridpur,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI,  MIRZA,  Bedar  Bakht  Bahadur. 
The  title  is  personal,  the  Mirza  being  a  descendant  of  the  Oudh  family. 
Residence. — Lucknow,  Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  title  is  personal,  being  the  courtesy  title  held  by  the  Prince  as  the 
eleventh  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI,  T.,  Khan  Bahadur. 

Granted  the  title  of  Khan  Bahadur,  in  promotion  from  that  of  Khan 
Saheb,  as  a  personal  distinction,  2nd  January  1893. 
Residence. — M  adras. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb. 
The  title  is  hereditary. 
Residence. — Sehwan,  Sind. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN  (of  Hasanpur),  Rdjd. 

Born  24th  May  1857.  The  title  is  hereditary.  The  Raja  is  the  head  of 
the  Musalman  branch  of  the  great  Bachgoti  sept  of  the  illustrious  Chauhan 
clan  of  Rajputs, — for  an  account  of  the  Hindu  branch  of  this  family  see  the 
accounts  of  Madho  Prasad  Singh,  Rai  of  Adharganj,  and  Partab  Bahadur 
Singh,  Raja  of  Kurwar.  Of  the  two  grandsons  of  Bariar  Singh,  one,  Chahar 
Sen,  was  the  ancestor  of  the  Adharganj  Rais ;  the  other,  Rup  Singh,  had 
three  grandsons,  of  whom  the  second,  Prithipat  Singh,  was  the  ancestor  of 
the  Kurwar  Rajas,  while  the  eldest,  Jai  Chand,  was  the  ancestor  of 
this. Hasanpur  family.  His  son,  Tilok  Chand,  fell  a  prisoner  into  the  hands 
of  the  Emperor  Babar,  and  to  regain  his  liberty  adopted  the  Muhammadan 
faith,  his  name  being  changed  to  Tatar  Khan.  He  also  received  from  the 
Emperor  the  title  of  Khan-i-Azam,  whence  his  family  have  the  name  of 
Khanzadas.  His  grandson,  Hasan  Khan,  was  a  favourite  of  the  Emperor 
Sher  Shah,  who  visited  his  capital  of  Hasanpur  (previously  called  Narwal), 
and  gave  him  the  right  of  creating  Rajas  in  Eastern  Oudh.  The  Raja 
Husain  Ali  took  an  active  part  against  the  Government  in  the  Mutiny  of 
1857,  and  commanded  the  rebel  infantry  at  the  battle  of  Sultanpur  in  1858, 
in  which  his  only  son  was  killed.  Under  the  terms  of  the  general  amnesty 
he  recovered  his  estates ;  but  died  in  1860,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother 
the  Raja  Khairat  Ali,  father  of  the  present  Raja.  The  latter  succeeded  in 
1869  ;  and  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate. 

Residence. — Hasanpur,  Sultdnpur,  Oudh. 


33o  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN,  Nawdb  Bahadur. 

The  Nawdb  Bahadur  bears  this  courtesy  title  as  the  grandson  of  the  late 
Amjad  Ali  Shah,  fourth  King  of  Oudh.  The  Nawdb  Bahadur's  father  was 
the  Nizdm-ud-dauld,  who  married  the  daughter  of  that  monarch. 

Residence. — Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN  (of  Kunjpurd),  Nawdb. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Nawdb  being  the  descendant  of  a  Pathan 
family  founded  by  the  Nawdb  Nijabat  Khan  about  the  close  of  the  last 
century.  He  came  from  Kandahar  with  a  following  of  free  lances,  and 
ultimately  established  himself  at  Kunjpurd.  He  aided  the  invader  Nadir 
Shah,  and  obtained  from  that  Emperor  the  title  of  Nawdb.  In  1808-9 
the  Chief  of  Kunjpurd,  with  the  other  Cis-Sutlej  States,  came  under  British 
protection.  In  the  rearrangements  after  the  second  Sikh  war,  in  1849, 
Kunjpurd  became  British  territory,  and  its  Chief  was  invested  with  Magisterial 
power.  The  Nawdb  Muhammad  Rahmat  Khan,  great-grandson  of  the 
Nawdb  Muhammad  Nijabat  Khan,  left  four  sons,  of  whom  the  eldest  died 
without  issue  ;  and  the  second,  the  Nawdb  Gholam  Ali  Khan,  who  succeeded 
him,  was  the  father  of  the  present  Nawdb.  The  latter  has  a  son  and  heir 
named  Muhammad  Ahmad  Ali  Khan. 

Residence. — Kunjpurd,  Karndl,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN,  Khdn  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  i6th  February  1887,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most  Gracious  Majesty. 
Residence. — Meerut,  North- Western  Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  KHAN  (of  Chitari). 
See  Muhammad  Mahmud  Ali  Khan. 

MUHAMMAD  ALI  NAKI  KHAN,  Mirza  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Mirza  Bahadur  being  the  son  of  the  Nawdb 
Imam  Ali  Khan,  who  was  the  grandson  of  the  late  Shujd-ud-dauld,  King  of 
Oudh. 

Residence. — O  udh. 

MUHAMMAD  ALLAHDAD  KHAN,  Sarddr  Bahadur, 
Khdn  Bahadur. 

Born  1825.  The  title  of  Sarddr  Bahadur  was  conferred  on  24th  June 
1859,  as  a  personal  distinction,  for  his  eminent  services  during  the  Mutiny; 
and  the  additional  title  of  Khan  Bahadur,  also  as  a  personal  distinction,  was 
conferred  in  1878.  The  Sarddr  Bahadur  comes  of  a  Pathan  family, 
distinguished  on  both  sides  for  their  military  services ;  his  maternal 
grandfather  was  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  forces  of  Hafiz  Rahmat  Khan  of 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  331 

Rohilkhand,  whilst  his  paternal  grandfather  was  an  officer  of  high  rank  in 
the  army  of  the  King  of  Oudh.  He  is  a  retired  Risaldar  of  the  First  Punjab 
Cavalry ;  and  distinguished  himself  so  much  by  his  valour  and  loyalty  during 
the  Mutiny  of  1857  that  he  was  created  a  Member  of  the  Order  of  British 
India  of  the  First  Class,  with  the  title  of  Sardar  Bahadur,  and  a  grant  of 
some  land.  He  has  several  sons. 

Residence. — Bareilly,  North- Western  Provinces. 

MUHAMMAD  AMIN  KHAN,  KHAN  KEL,  Khan  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2  7th  March  1880. 
Residence. — Koha"t,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  AMIR,  Khan  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Pesha"war,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  AMIR  HASAN  KHAN,  SIR,  K.C.I.B. 
(of  Mahmudabad),  Raja,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

Born  1849;  succeeded  his  father,  the  Raja  Nawab  AH  Khan,  in  1858. 
These  titles  are  hereditary,  and  were  conferred  by  the  British  Government 
on  4th  December  1877,  24th  May  1883,  and  5th  March  1884,  having  been 
originally  derived,  with  other  honours,  from  the  Mughal  Emperors  of  Delhi 
and  from  the  Kings  of  Oudh.  The  Raja  of  Mahmudabad  is  also  entitled  to 
be  addressed  as  "  Amir-ud-daula,  Sayyid-ul-Mulk,  Mumtaz  Jang,"  a  distinction 
proposed  for  him  by  Sir  Henry  Davies  when  Chief  Commissioner  of  Oudh, 
as  a  special  mark  of  recognition  of  his  public  services.  The  Raja  is  the  first 
cousin  of  the  Raja  of  Paintepur ;  and  though  belonging  by  birth  to  the 
younger  branch  of  the  family,  is  the  head  of  the  elder  branch  by  adoption. 
The  family  is  Shaikh  Sadiki ;  but  they  are  usually  called  Khanzadas,  because 
at  some  remote  period  the  title  of  Khan  was  bestowed  on  one  of  their 
ancestors.  The  founder  of  the  family  was  Shaikh  Nathu,  who  about  1360 
A.D.  was  employed  by  the  King  of  Delhi  against  the  Bhars,  and  was  re- 
warded for  his  services  by  the  grant  of  large  estates  in  Fatehpur.  His 
descendant,  Daud  Khan,  being  a  General  in  the  Delhi  army,  was  created  a 
Nawab ;  and  Daud's  grandson,  the  Nawab  Bazid  Khan,  obtained  the  addi- 
tional titles  of  Bahadur,  Muzaffar  Jang,  and  some  others.  The  Nawab 
Daud  Khan's  son,  Mahmud,  founded  the  town  of  Mahmudabad  about  1677, 
and  it  has  ever  since  remained  the  seat  of  the  family.  He  was  Imperial 
Governor  of  Jaunpur,  and  died  at  that  place.  A  descendant,  the  Nawab 
Muhammad  Imam  Khan,  divided  his  estates  between  his  two  sons;  the 
elder,  the  Nawab  Muhammad  Ikram  Khan,  retained  Mahmudabad,  while 
the  younger,  Maghar  Ali  Khan,  obtained  Belahra,  and  became  the  ancestor 
of  the  Rajas  of  Paintepur  and  Belahra.  Muhammad  Ikram  Khan's  two  sons, 
Sarfaraz  Ali  Khan  and  Musahib  Ali  Khan,  both  died  without  issue;  the 
widow  of  the  latter,  who  succeeded  him  in  1810,  was  at  the  head  of  the 
Mahmudabad  estate  till  1838,  when  she  died,  having  adopted  a  cousin  from 
the  Belahra  side,  named  Nawab  Ali.  The  latter  was  an  able  man,  who 
greatly  increased  the  estate ;  he  was  also  a  distinguished  scholar  and  poet. 


332  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 

He  died  in  1858;  and  was  succeeded  by  his  only  son,  the  present  Raja, 
who  was  a  minor  under  the  Court  of  Wards  till  1867.  Educated  at  Sitdpur 
School,  Benares  College,  and  Canning  College,  Lucknow.  In  1871  he  was 
elected  Vice-President  of  the  British  Indian  Association,  and  has  since  been 
President  of  that  important  body.  At  the  great  Darbdr  held  by  the  late 
Lord  Lawrence  in  Lucknow,  he  was  presented  with  a  Sword  of  Honour ;  and 
on  2nd  January  1893,  was  created  a  Knight  Commander  of  the  Most 
Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire.  He  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate,  and 
has  the  powers  of  an  Assistant  Collector.  He  has  a  son  and  heir,  named 
Ali  Muhammad  Khdn,  born  1881. 

Residence. — Mahmudabad,  Sitdpur,  Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  ANWAR-UD-DIN,  Khdn  Bahddur. 

Born  1849.  The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  3oth  March 
1876,  the  Khdn  Bahddur  being  one  of  the  sons  of  Rashid-ud-dauld,  half- 
brother  of  His  late  Highness  Azim  Jdh,  the  first  of  the  titular  Princes  of 
Arcot. 

Residence. — Madras. 

MUHAMMAD  ANWAR-UL-HAK,  MAULAVI,  Khdn  Bahddur. 
The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  2oth  May  1890. 
Residence. — Abu,  Rdjputdna. 

MUHAMMAD  ASGHAR,  ALI,  Mirza  Bahddur. 

The  title  is  personal,  the  Mirza  Bahadur  being  the  son  of  the  Mirza 
Khurram  Bakht,  and  grandson  of  the  late  Muhammad  Ali  Shdh,  King  of 
Oudh. 

Residence. — Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  ASGHAR  HUMAYUN  JAH  MIRZA  BAHADUR, 

Prince. 

The  title  is  personal,  being  the  courtesy  title  of  the  sons  of  His  late 
Majesty  the  King  of  Oudh.     The  Prince  is  the  sixteenth  son. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  ASHRAP  (of  Asifpur),    Chaudhri. 
The  title  was  conferred  as  a  personal  distinction  in  1877. 
Residence. — Asifpur,  Hardoi,  Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  ASKARI,  Mirza  Bahddur. 

The  Mirza  Bahddur  enjoys  this  title  as  a  personal  distinction,  as  being 
the  son  of  Prince  Rafi-uz-Shan  Mirza  Muhammad  Naki  Ali  Bahadur,  and 
grandson  of  His  late  Majesty  Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  King  of  Oudh. 

Residence. — Oudh. 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  333 


MUHAMMAD  ASKARI  BULAND  JAH  MIRZA  BAHADUR, 

Prince. 

The  title  is  personal,  being  the  courtesy  title  enjoyed  by  this  nobleman  as 
seventh  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 
Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  ASLAM  KHAN,  C.I.B.,  Sarddr  Bahadur. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  22nd  October  1881.  Was 
created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Eminent  Order  of  the  Indian  Empire,  1 5th 
February  1887,  on  the  occasion  of  the  Jubilee  of  the  reign  of  Her  Most 
Gracious  Majesty. 

Residence. — Pesha"war,  Punjab. 

MUHAMMAD  ASLAM  KHAN,  KAZI,  C.M.G. 
Has  been  created  a  Companion  of  the  Most  Distinguished  Order  of  St. 
Michael  and  St.  George. 

MUHAMMAD  AZIM  (of  Kakrali),    Chaudhri. 

Born  1853  ;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Raja  Khaslat  Husain,  in  1882. 
The  title  of  Chaudhri  is  hereditary,  having  been  so  under  the  old  Govern- 
ment of  Oudh,  and  so  recognised  by  the  British  Government  in  1877.  The 
head  of  the  family  was,  before  the  annexation  of  Oudh,  Chakladdr  or  Chaudhri 
of  Sandila.  The  present  Chaudhri's  grandfather,  Chaudhri  Hashmat  Ali, 
was  well  spoken  of  by  Sir  William  Sleeman  in  his  account  of  Oudh.  He  at 
first  took  part  against  the  Government  in  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  and  was  a 
noted  and  active  rebel  leader,  frequently  engaged  with  the  British  troops,  and 
acting  as  Nazim  of  Hardoi  and  the  neighbouring  districts.  He  had,  however, 
the  reputation  of  being  an  honourable  enemy,  never  guilty  of  any  cruelties ; 
and  early  in  1858  he  tendered  his  submission,  and  became  as  active  on  the 
side  of  the  Government,  being  engaged  in  many  actions  against  the  rebels. 
For  these  services  he  received  a  khilat  and  a  grant  of  land.  He  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  son,  Chaudhri  Khaslat  Husain,  who  was  an  Honorary  Magis- 
trate and  Assistant  Collector,  Secretary  to  the  Aujuman-i-Hind  of  Oudh,  and, 
shortly  before  his  death,  was  given  the  rank  of  Raja  as  a  personal  distinction. 
The  present  Chaudhri  is  an  Honorary  Magistrate ;  he  has  a  son  and  heir, 
named  Muhammad  Jan,  born  1867. 

Residence. — Hardoi,  Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  AZMAT  ALI  KHAN.     See  Azmat  Ali  Khan. 


MUHAMMAD  BABAR  MIRZA  BAHADUR,  Prince. 

The  title  is  personal,  being  the  courtesy  title  enjoyed  by  the  Prince  as  the 
sixth  son  of  the  late  King  of  Oudh. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 


334  THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA 


MUHAMMAD  BAHRAM  SHAH  (of  Rassapagla),  Shdhzdda. 

The  title  is  personal,  and  was  conferred  on  nth  June  1860,  in  recogni- 
tion of  the  Shahzada's  position  as  a  lineal  descendant  of  Tippu,  Sultan  of 
Mysore. 

Residence. — Calcutta,  Bengal. 

MUHAMMAD  BAKAR  walad  AHMAD  KHAN,  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary,  the  Mir  being  the  representative  of  one  of  the 
Mirs  or  Chiefs  of  Sind  at  the  time  of  the  annexation  (see  Khairpur). 
Residence. — Shikdrpur,  Sind. 

MUHAMMAD  BAKAR  ALI  (of  Kotaha),  Mir. 

The  title  is  hereditary ;  the  Mir  belonging  to  a  Sayyid  (Muhammadan) 
family,  claiming  descent  from  Kasim  AH  Khan,  who  was  the  Physician  to  the 
Imperial  Court  at  Delhi,  and  acquired  the  Kotaha  territory  in  the  last  cen- 
tury in  the  following  circumstances.  The  ruler  of  Kotaha  was  a  Rajput  Raja 
named  Dup  Chand,  a  feudatory  of  the  Raja  of  Sirmur.  Being  expelled  by 
the  Sirmur  Raja,  he  repaired  to  Delhi  to  get  assistance  from  the  Emperor ; 
and  having  given  one  of  his  daughters  to  the  Imperial  zandna,  and  forced  his 
son  to  embrace  Islam,  he  obtained  some  troops  to  reinstate  him.  The  force 
was  accompanied  by  the  Imperial  Physician,  Kasim  Ali  Khan,  as  Political 
Agent.  Both  the  Raja  Dup  Chand  and  his  son,  Fil  Murad,  died  without 
issue ;  so  Kasim  AH  Khan  then  established  himself  in  their  place  at  Kotaha. 
His  grandson,  Mir  Muhammad  Jafar  Ali  Khan,  obtained  from  General 
Ochterlony,  after  the  expulsion  of  the  Gurkhas  in  1815,  the  grant  of  the 
jdgir  of  Kotaha.  During  the  Mutiny  of  1857  the  Mir  Muhammad  Akbar 
Ali  Khan  was  suspected  of  sympathising  with  the  rebels,  and  his  fort  at 
Kotaha  was  destroyed.  Again,  in  1864,  the  fort  was  rebuilt,  contrary  to  the 
orders  of  Government ;  it  was  again  destroyed,  and  the  Mir  banished  He 
died  in  exile,  and  his  grandson,  the  present  Mir,  was  reinstated  in  his 
estates.  He  has  two  sons — Sayyid  Muhammad  and  Muhammad  Jdfar  Ali. 

Residence. — Kotaha,  Ambdla,  Punjab. 


MUHAMMAD  BAKAR  ALI  KHAN  (of  Kunwa  Khera), 

Nawdb. 

Bom  1851;  succeeded  his  father,  the  late  Nawab  Amjad  Ali  Khan,  in  1 875. 
The  title  is  hereditary,  having  been  originally  conferred  by  the  King  of  Oudh, 
Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  on  an  ancestor  of  the  present  Nawab,  and  recognised  by 
the  British  Government  in  1877.  The  Nawab  is  descended  from  Khwaja 
Safi,  a  Kashmiri  noble  who  took  service  with  Asaf-ud-daula,  fifth  King  of 
Oudh.  Khwaja  Safi's  son,  Hakim  Mehndi,  was  Nazim  of  Muhamdi  and 
Khairabad  from  1799  to  1819 ;  Prime  Minister  to  Nasir-ud-din  Haidar  from 
1830  to  1832,  and  to  Muhammad  Ali  Shah  in  1837.  As  Chakladdr  he 
made  the  district  a  garden,  constructed  numerous  public  works,  and  gained 
the  universal  respect  and  affection  of  the  people.  He  died  24th  December 
1837,  and  left  a  portion  of  his  vast  property  to  his  brother's  son,  Ahmad 


THE  GOLDEN  BOOK  OF  INDIA  335 

Ali,  Nawab  Munawar-ud-daula,  who  was  the  Prime  Minister  of  the  King 
Muhammad  Ali  Shah,  and  himself  connected  by  marriage  with  the  King's 
family.  The  latter  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Nawab  Ashraf-ud-daula,  Amjad 
Ali  Khan,  who  was  a  General  in  the  army  of  the  King  of  Oudh.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  the  present  Nawab,  in  1875. 
Residence. — Kunwa  Khera,  Sitapur,  Oudh. 

MUHAMMAD  BARKAT  ALI  KHAN,  Khan  Bahadur. 

The  title  was  conferred  on  2Qth  May  1868,  for  distinguished  military  and 
police  services.  Belongs  to  a  Pathan  family  j  descended  from  Muhammad 
Sahab  Khan,  who  followed  the  Nawab  Bahadur  Khan  from  Peshawar  into 
India.  The  Khan  Bahadur's  father,  Muhammad  Arif  Khan,  was  the  son  of 
Abdulla  Khan,  alias  Buddu  Khan ;  he  entered  the  service  of  the  British 
Government,  and  on  retirement  on  pension  received  a  grant  of  land.  The 
Khan  Bahadur  entered  the  service  of  the  British  Government  in  1847,  and 
rendered  good  service  as  a  police  officer  in  the  Hoshiarpur  district.  In  1848 
he  was  severely  wounded  in  the  fight  at  the  Amb  Bagh  in  the  Jashwan  Dan ; 
where,  under  the  orders  of  Lord  Lawrence,  then  Commissioner  of  the  Trans- 
Sutlej  States,  he  gallantly  showed  the  way  up  the  hill  to  attack  the  insurgents 
posted  on  the  top.  Subsequently  he  became  Risaldar  of  the  Mounted  Police 
at  Amritsar,  and  assisted  in  the  capture  of  the  26th  Native  Infantry  mutineers. 
In  1860  he  was  appointed  Tahsildar  of  Lahore,  and  distinguished  himself 
by  his  exertions  in  the  cholera  epidemic  at  Lahore  in  1867;  and  sub- 
sequently in  raising  mules  and  muleteers  for  service  in  Abyssinia.  Appointed 
Extra  Assistant  Commissioner  of  Lahore ;  and  has  received  the  thanks  of 
the  Government  of  India  and  of  the  Punjab  for  his  valuable  political  ser- 
vices. He  i